Social & Smartphone:
ENG
ITA
ENG
THE LAKES OF PILATUS
I LAGHI DI PILATO
9 Sep 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /28. The mountains still hide their ultimate enigma (END)
At some moment in time, possibly during the fourteenth century, a sinister tale concerning the cursed burial place of Pontius Pilate settled right in the middle of what we know today as the Sibillini Mountain Range, in the Italian Apennines.

Why did so odd an occurrence happen?

Sure enough, it did not happen by mere chance.

Maybe our readers remember what we wrote in another research paper, with reference to another legend which lives in the very same territory. In “Birth of a Sibyl - The medieval connection”, we asked ourselves the following question: why such tales and stories did elect to stop exactly there, amid the peaks of the Sibillini Mountain Range? (Fig. 1)

The above question was posed with reference to the legend of the Apennine Sibyl and its lineage from written and oral narratives concerning Morgan le Fay and the enchantress Sebile, both pertaining to the illustrious tradition of the Matter of Britain.

But the very same consideration can be re-stated, in the present paper, with reference to the legendary tale concerning the Lakes of Pilate.

We wrote that the Sibyl's legend was transplated into the Sibillini Mountain Range from some different cultural areas and geographic territories: a transferral into that specific, particular spot of land. This is also true for Pontius Pilate.

We wrote that the Apennine Sibyl is the final outcome of an evolutionary process which settled eventually down in the area that is known today under the name of Sibillini Mountain Range. This is also true for the legend which refers to Pilate's burial place.

We asked ourselves whether we were treading a path that was about to lead to a sad final destination merely consisting in a sorrowful 'downgrade' of the Apennine Sibyl, from an independent, original myth to a sheer adaptation of legends developed elsewhere.

And the answer was no.

We wrote that, as a matter of fact, that was not the end of the Apennine Sibyl's legend. Likewise, this is not the end of the legend of the Lakes of Pilate. In the very same way.

Because Pontius Pilate, a fascinating historical and mythical figure as he is, is not enough to explain why it all happened.

The enigma which concerns the Lakes of Pilate is everything but solved.

Because now the question is: for what reason did the lore about Pontius Pilate establish itselfs by these lakes? Why such a gloomy tale did elect to stop exactly there, amid the peaks of the Sibillini Mountain Range? Why this extraordinary narrative settled down precisely in this spot, lost amid the mountainous fastnesses of the Italian Apennines? (Fig. 2)

As we already wrote with reference to the Apennine Sibyl, the legendary narrative material belonging to the ancient lore concerning the burial places traditionally assigned to Pontius Pilate (Rome and the Tiber, Vienne and the Rhône, Saint-Chamond, Lausanne and the Alps), might as well have landed at any other location in Italy or elsewhere, depositing its mythical charge into a different place, so as to set up a brand new branch of the legend concerning a demonic resting place at any other lake or marsh or mountain across the Italian Apennines, from Liguria to Calabria. Anywhere else.

But the legend established itself right here: in the middle of the Sibillini Mountain Range.

What sort of magnetic pull did attract the magical tale about Pontius Pilate to the glacial cirque of Mount Vettore? For what kind of fated chance did the prefect's sinister narrative come to rest, like a ball spinning on a roulette wheel, right into the position marked by this remote Italian mountain?

The land of Italy is scattered of hundreds of lakes, peaks and mountaintops: why weren't they fit to house a legend on demons and dead bodies?

Why the Lakes of Pilate?

No scholar has ever addressed this issue. We found no answers on that in Arturo Graf, who is the only author who explicitly addressed the matter. No research paper has ever dealt with this fundamental question.

And wholly nonsensical appears to be the popular argument which ascribes the dark, fiendish fame of the lake to the presence of the poor, small, utterly frail 'Chirocephalus Marchesonii', the tiny coral-red shrimp which merrily swims and drifts across the icy waters of the Lakes of Pilate: no awe-inspiring demon can be shaped in any medieval mind by this gentle, inoffensive little animal, not to mention any mythical capacity that might be ascribed to it as to raising violent storms, if not perfectly minuscule (Fig. 3).

Of course, there is more to it.

Because the fundamental issue of our whole search, the most critical one, is the following: it actually appears that both the Lakes of Pilate and the Apennine Sibyl arose from some odd condensation of a peculiar nature which marks this place, the Sibillini Mountain Range.

There is a sort of original core pertaining to both legends: something that was not transplanted from any other place or tradition, something that was born right here instead, and possibly connected to the fact that this location is some genre of very special site.

We have to keep in mind one major aspect. It is certainly true that Antoine de la Sale, at folium 2v of his “The Paradise of Queen Sibyl” reports that the mountain which houses the lake is a place «which some name the mountain of the lake of Pilate» (in the original French text: «que aulcuns appellent le mont du lac de pillate»). But, just in the very same line, he adds that the lake's name is much more remarkable (Fig 4):

«Mountain of the lake of Queen Sibyl» (in the original French text: «Mont du lac de la royne sibille»).

And this very remark is stated again in the drawing of the mount and lake proposed by Antoine de la Sale at folium 5v (Fig. 5).

And he also re-states it at folia 4r-4v: «Others call it the lake of the Sibyl because Mount Sibyl is right before it and connected to the lake, apart from a small streamlet which runs between them in the way portrayed in the following figure» («Les autres lappellent le lac de la sibille pour ce que le mont de la sibille est devant et joignant a cestu fors dun petit ruisseau qui court entre deux en la maniere que cy apres est pourtrait») (Fig. 6).

The Lakes of Pilate are not Pilate's. They are the Lakes of the Sibyl.

And there is another point not to be forgotten. A point which makes the Lakes and Cave further closer one another.

In our previously-released research paper “Apennine Sibyl: the bright side and the dark side”, we mentioned a passage about the Sibyl's cave taken from “De la hayne de Satan et malins esprist contro l'homme”, a treatise written in the sixteenth century by Pierre Crespet, also known as 'Crespetus', a Celestinian monk. In his work, in which he extensively elaborates on the Sibyl of Norcia, we find the following words (Fig. 7):

«When a necromancer or other person talks to the Sibyl, storms and lightnings are stirred frightfully across the whole land».

[In the original French text: «quand on communique avec elle, soyt magicien ou autre, les tempestes & foudres s'esmouvent horriblement par tout le païs»].

Because we saw, in that paper, that the Apennine Sibyl was considered as an evil being ranked in the fiendish class of 'subterranean demon', for which the German Benedictine abbot Johannes Trithemius, in his “Liber octo quaestionum ad Maximilianum Cesarem” published in 1515, wrote that «they can cause wind and flames to erupt from holes in the ground» («hiatus efficiunt terrae ventosque flaminomos suscitant») (Fig. 8).

The Lakes and the Cave. The same demons. The same tempests. The same destruction.

We are getting to a far-reaching conclusion, a new and exciting starting point.

Mount Vettore and Mount Sibyl. The Lakes of Pilate and the Sibyl's Cave. The two legends are linked together in some mysterious way. An enigmatic connection that is still to be unveiled.

But how could we ever think that the two legends are unrelated, if we consider that the two sites are only five miles apart from each other, and in full mutual view? (Fig. 9)

Our thrilling enquiry is not over. We have unfolded the heavy chivalric layers which sheltered from view the inner, most genuine core of the Apennine Sibyl's legend. We have found Morgan le Fay and Sebile. And we have also walked in company of Pontius Pilate, a legendary tale that has its roots elsewhere in Europe, and has settled here, by the gloomy waters that were already inhabited by demons, and were considered as Lakes of the Sibyl.

But, still, we have not reached the true nucleus of both myths.

There is something more to it. Something sinister, something obscure which has magnetized all that mythical might, both literary and oral, onto that specific place of Earth: an Italian mountainous range, lost in the middle of the Apennines.

We need to go further. We need to fully unfold the residual additions that still conceal the main, focal point of the legends of Mount Sibyl and the Lakes of Pilate. The point from which it all began.

Our work is not finished yet. The mystery is not still solved. The enigma still lies there.

Because the legends of the Apennine Sibyl and the Lakes of Pilate are not dead at all. We want to clutch their ultimate secret in our hands. We want to find out who they really are.

The hunt for the secret of the Sibillini Mountain Range is not over.

And we are now ready, as we will see in a further series of article we will soon publish, for the final, decisive step.

A step that will unveil the very nature, and the true semblance, of these fascinating legends.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /28. Le montagne celano ancora il loro più riposto segreto (FINE)
In uno specifico momento della storia, nel corso del quattordicesimo secolo, un sinistro racconto riguardante il maledetto luogo di sepoltura di Ponzio Pilato è venuto a stabilirsi esattamente al centro del territorio che oggi conosciamo con il nome di Monti Sibillini, negli Appennini italiani.

Perché si è verificato questo evento così peculiare?

Sicuramente, ciò non è avvenuto per una mera casualità.

Forse il nostro lettore ricorderà ciò che avemmo occasione di scrivere in una precedente ricerca, dedicata a un'altra leggenda che vive nel medesimo territorio. In "Nascita di una Sibilla: la traccia medievale", ci eravamo posti la seguente domanda: perché questi racconti e queste storie hanno deciso di fermarsi proprio qui, tra i picchi dei Monti Sibillini? (Fig. 1)

Quella domanda era stata posta in riferimento alla leggenda della Sibilla Appenninica e alla sua derivazione dalle narrazioni letterarie e orali relative a Morgana la Fata e all'incantatrice Sebile, entrambi personaggi appartenenti all'illustre tradizione della Materia di Bretagna.

Ma le stesse considerazioni possono essere ri-enunciate, nel presente articolo, in relazione al racconto leggendario che riguarda i Laghi di Pilato.

Avevamo scritto che la leggenda della Sibilla era stata trasferita presso i Monti Sibillini giungendo da differenti aree culturali e ambiti geografici: un trasferimento che aveva individuato come propria destinazione quello specifico, particolarissimo luogo. Ciò risulta essere vero anche per Ponzio Pilato.

Avevamo scritto che la Sibilla Appenninica costituiva il risultato finale di un processo evolutivo che era andato infine a stabilirsi nel territorio conosciuto oggi con il nome di Monti Sibillini. Questo è vero anche per la leggenda che riguarda il luogo di sepoltura di Ponzio Pilato.

Ci eravamo chiesti se fossimo in procinto di percorrere un sentiero che ci avrebbe infine condotto verso una triste conclusione, consistente in un triste, deludente declassamento della Sibilla Appenninica da mito indipendente e originale a mero adattamento di leggende sviluppatesi altrove.

E la risposta era stata negativa.

Avevamo scritto che, a tutti gli effetti, ciò non avrebbe affatto significato la fine della leggenda della Sibilla Appenninica. E questa, infatti, non è nemmeno la fine della leggenda dei Laghi di Pilato. Esattamente come per la Sibilla.

Perché Ponzio Pilato, per quanto si tratti di una figura affascinante sia dal punto di vista storico che leggendario, non basta in alcun modo a spiegare perché tutto ciò sia avvenuto.

L'enigma che caratterizza i Laghi di Pilato, infatti, non è affatto risolto.

Perché ora la questione diventa: per quale ragione questa tradizione leggendaria relativa a Ponzio Pilato è venuta a stabilirsi presso questi laghi? Perché un racconto così tenebroso ha deciso di arrestarsi esattamente qui, tra i picchi dei Monti Sibillini? Perché questa straordinaria narrazione ha preso dimora precisamente in questo punto, perduto tra i bastioni di roccia degli Appennini italiani? (Fig. 2)

Come abbiamo già avuto modo di scrivere in relazione alla Sibilla Appenninica, il materiale narrativo leggendario appartenente all'antico mito che racconta dei luoghi di sepoltura tradizionalmente assegnati a Ponzio Pilato (Roma e il Tevere, Vienne e il Rodano, Saint-Chamond, Losanna e le Alpi), ben avrebbe potuto atterrare presso qualsiasi altra località, in Italia o altrove, depositando la propria carica mitica in un luogo differente, in modo tale da porre in essere un nuovo ramo della leggenda riguardante un sepolcro demonico presso qualsiasi altro lago o palude o montagna presente negli Appennini italiani, dalla Liguria alla Calabria. Ovunque, ma altrove.

Ma quella leggenda si è stabilita esattamente qui: nel bel mezzo dei Monti Sibillini.

Quale sorta di magnetica attrazione ha potuto attirare quel magico racconto su Ponzio Pilato fino al circo glaciale del Monte Vettore? Per quale strano destino la sinistra narrazione concernente il prefetto romano è venuta a riposare, come la sfera metallica vorticante sul disco di una roulette, proprio nella posizione marcata da questa remota montagna italiana?

La terra d'Italia, infatti, è disseminata di migliaia di laghi, picchi e vette: perché questi non sono risultati adatti a ospitare una leggenda di dèmoni e cadaveri maledetti?

Perché proprio i Laghi di Pilato?

Nessuno studioso ha mai esaminato questa questione. Non abbiamo trovato risposte nell'opera di Arturo Graf, l'unico autore che abbia mai esplicitamente affrontato questo problema. Nessun articolo scientifico ha mai affrontato questa domanda fondamentale.

E del tutto inverosimile appare quell'argomentazione popolare che fa risalire l'oscura, demoniaca fama del lago alla presenza del povero, piccolo, fragilissimo 'Chirocephalus Marchesonii', il piccolo crostaceo color rosso corallo che allegramente nuota e veleggia nelle acque gelide dei Laghi di Pilato: nessun terrificante demone può essere evocato, nella mente dell'uomo medievale, a causa della visione di questo gentile e inoffensivo animaletto, per non parlare di qualsivoglia mitica capacità che possa essere attribuita al piccolo abitante del lago in relazione al suscitar bufere e tempeste, se non assolutamente minuscole (Fig. 3).

È ovvio che c'è qualcosa di più.

Perché il problema fondamentale di tutta la nostra ricerca, il rompicapo più critico, è il seguente: è evidente come sia i Laghi di Pilato che la Sibilla Appenninica siano sorti da qualche particolare condensazione relativa, in modo specifico, alla natura di questi luoghi, i Monti Sibillini.

Sussiste infatti una sorta di nucleo originale che segna entrambe le leggende: qualcosa che non è il frutto di un trapianto proveniente da altri siti o tradizioni, qualcosa che trova origine esattamente qui, in connessione, probabilmente, con il fatto che questo è un luogo particolarmente speciale.

Dobbiamo tenere a mente un aspetto di grande rilevanza. È certamente vero che Antoine de la Sale, al folium 2v del suo "Paradiso della Regina Sibilla", riferisce come la montagna che ospita il lago sia un luogo che «alcuni chiamano con il nome di lago di Pilato» (nel testo originale francese: «que aulcuns appellent le mont du lac de pillate»). Ma, proprio nella stessa riga, egli aggiunge che il nome di quel lago è assai più significativo (Fig. 4):

«Montagna del lago della Regina Sibilla» (nel testo originale francese: «Mont du lac de la royne sibille»).

E questa stessa affermazione è ripetuta anche nel disegno del monte e del lago propostoci da Antoine de la Sale al folium 5v (Fig. 5).

Ed egli ripete nuovamente la medesima asserzione ai folia 4r-4v: «Altri lo chiamano il Lago della Sibilla perché il Monte Sibilla è situato proprio di fronte, e unito a questo a meno di un piccolo ruscello che corre tra di loro, nel modo che qui di seguito viene raffigurato» («Les autres lappellent le lac de la sibille pour ce que le mont de la sibille est devant et joignant a cestu fors dun petit ruisseau qui court entre deux en la maniere que cy apres est pourtrait») (Fig. 6).

I Laghi di Pilato non sono di Pilato. Essi sono i Laghi della Sibilla.

E c'è anche un altro punto che non dobbiamo dimenticare. Un punto che avvicina ancor più, tra di loro, i Laghi e la Grotta.

Nel nostro articolo di ricerca "Sibilla Appenninica: il lato luminoso e il lato oscuro", già pubblicato in passato, avevamo menzionato un brano concernente la grotta della Sibilla, rinvenibile nel trattato "De la hayne de Satan et malins esprist contro l'homme”, scritto nel sedicesimo secolo da Pierre Crespet, noto anche come 'Crespetus', un monaco celestiniano. Nella sua opera, nella quale egli tratta estensivamente della Sibilla di Norcia, è possibile leggere le seguenti parole (Fig. 7):

«Quando un negromante o chiunque altro entra in contatto con la Sibilla, tempeste e fulmini si sollevano orribilmente per tutta la contrada».

[Nel testo originale francese: «quand on communique avec elle, soyt magicien ou autre, les tempestes & foudres s'esmouvent horriblement par tout le païs»].

Perché avevamo visto, in quell'articolo, come la Sibilla Appenninica fosse considerata come un essere malvagio, catalogabile all'interno della classe dei 'dèmoni sotterranei', per i quali l'abate benedettino tedesco Johannes Trithemius, nel suo “Liber octo quaestionum ad Maximilianum Cesarem”, pubblicato nel 1515, aveva scritto che essi sono «in grado di suscitare dalle fenditure della terra venti e fiamme» («hiatus efficiunt terrae ventosque flaminomos suscitant») (Fig. 8).

I Laghi e la Grotta. Gli stessi dèmoni. Le stesse tempeste. La stessa distruzione.

Stiamo per giungere a una conclusione dalle importanti conseguenze. Un nuovo ed eccitante punto di partenza.

Monte Vettore e Monte Sibilla. I Laghi di Pilato e la Grotta della Sibilla. Le due leggende sono collegate tra di loro in qualche modo misterioso. Una connessione enigmatica che deve ancora essere svelata.

Ma come avremmo mai potuto pensare che le due leggende possano essere tra di loro estranee e indipendenti, se solo consideriamo che i due siti si trovano solamente a otto chilometri di distanza l'uno dall'altro, e in piena linea di vista? (Fig. 9)

La nostra emozionante inchiesta non è finita. Abbiamo rimosso i pesanti livelli narrativi cavallereschi che nascondevano alla vista il nucleo più profondo e più autentico della leggenda della Sibilla Appenninica. Abbiamo trovato Morgana la Fata e Sebile. E abbiamo anche camminato in compagnia di Ponzio Pilato, un racconto leggendario che ha le proprie radici altrove in Europa, ed è venuto a stabilirsi qui, in acque oscure che già erano abitate da dèmoni, ed erano considerate come i Laghi della Sibilla.

Ma, ancora, non abbiamo raggiunto il vero nucleo dei due miti.

C'è qualcosa di più. Qualcosa di sinistro, qualcosa di tenebroso che ha attratto a sé tutta questa potenza mitica, sia letteraria che orale, fino a questo specifico luogo della terra: un massiccio montuoso in Italia, perduto nel mezzo degli Appennini.

È necessario procedere oltre. Dobbiamo sfogliare completamente i rimanenti livelli addizionali che ancora nascondono il punto focale, primario della leggenda del Monte Sibilla e dei Laghi di Pilato. Il punto dal quale tutto è cominciato.

Il nostro lavoro non è ancora terminato. Il mistero non è ancora risolto. L'enigma si trova ancora lì.

Perché le leggende della Sibilla Appenninica e dei Laghi di Pilato non sono affatto morte. Vogliamo afferrare con le nostre mani il loro segreto più definitivo. Vogliamo sapere chi esse realmente siano.

La caccia ai segreti dei Monti Sibillini non è terminata.

E siamo ora pronti, come vedremo in una prossima serie di articoli che andremo presto a pubblicare, per il passo decisivo e finale.

Un passo che ci svelerà la reale natura, e il vero sembiante, di queste affascinanti leggende.












































































































































7 Sep 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /27. A recap and a final question
We are about to conclude out astounding journey across the legend of Pontius Pilate, and the legend of the Lakes of Pilate set in the middle of the Sibillini Mountain Range, in central Italy.

We had a close encounter with a historical figure: Pontius Pilate, the fifth prefect of Judaea from 26 A.D. to 36 A.D., an official of the Roman Empire who played a key role in the Passion of Jesus Christ. We read the words that were written on him by classical authors such as Flavius Josephus and Philo of Alexandria, and, of course, the passages which mention Pilate in the canonical Gospels.

We perused the words of the Fathers of the Church who, since the earliest centuries of Christianity, addressed a tricky issue: did Pilate actually make substantial efforts to set Jesus free from the accusations that were made against him by the Jews? Or, did he eventually leave the Son of God to his doom of death on the Cross? Across the centuries, different answers were pronounced which led to consider the Roman prefect either as a saint or a servant to the Evil.

Then we ventured ourselves into the Middle Ages, and found that many apocryphal works on Pontius Pilate were circulating throughout Europe, certainly arising from a mesh of oral tales which were narrated before fascinated audiences belonging to all social classes. We saw that the prefect of Judaea has treaded the medieval centuries attracting ever-growing legendary accounts on his life, deeds, final prosecution by an almost Christianised Emperor, be it Tiberius or Vespasian, and final death.

And we saw that the tales on Pilate provided many details on his ultimate resting place as well.

Actually, there was more than one single resting place. And all such places were infested by demons.

Be it the Tiber in Rome, or the river Rhône by the French town of Vienne, or a marsh or a pit in the Swiss Alps, the fiendish corpse of Pontius Pilate was not to find any rest: demons awaited his arrival and rejoiced in his company, arousing storms and tempests at the very spot of the prefect's burial.

This is similar, so similar to what Antoine de la Sale narrated in his “The Paradise of Queen Sibyl”, dating to the first half of the fifteenth century: in the vicinity of Mount Sibyl, a Lake of Pilate housed exactly the same story, with the addition of a chariot and buffaloes, a canonical image of the Triumph of Death. And his story portrays the same tempests.

However, not a single manuscripted work belonging to the medieval tradition on the cursed burial place of Pilate, including “De Vita Pilati” and the “Legenda Aurea”, ever mentions the Apennines or the region around Mount Sibyl as one of Pontius Pilate's haunted resting places.

The legendary narration is certainly the same, but the Lakes of Pilate and the Sibillini Mountain Range do not seem to be part of it. Especially when we consider that the earliest retrievable mention about our Italian lake, as found in Petrus Berchorius' “Reductorium Morale”, does report about the presence of demons, but at the same time does not provide any mention of the name of Pilate.

Therefore, we concluded, sure enough the legend was not born here: as a matter of fact, it was transplanted to this place, deeply set within the glacial cirque of Mount Vettore, as an extraneous mythical material. And the myth was possibly transferred to this location around the beginning of the second half of the fourteenth century.

The final question is: why?
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /27. Un riepilogo e una domanda conclusiva
Siamo ormai prossimi al termine del nostro straordinario viaggio attraverso il mito di Ponzio Pilato, e la leggenda dei Laghi di Pilato, situati tra le vette dei Monti Sibillini, nell'Italia centrale.

Abbiamo potuto effettuare un incontro ravvicinato con un famoso personaggio storico: Ponzio Pilato, il quinto prefetto della Giudea dal 26 a.C. al 36 d.C., il funzionario dell'impero romano che interpretò un ruolo fondamentale nella Passione di Gesù Cristo. Abbiamo letto le parole che furono scritte su di lui da autori classici come Flavio Giuseppe e Filone d'Alessandria, e, naturalmente, i brani che menzionano Pilato nei Vangeli canonici.

Abbiamo consultato le opere dei Padri della Chiesa, i quali, sin dai primi secoli della Cristianità, hanno avuto modo di confrontarsi con una questione assai spinosa: Pilato si adoperò effettivamente per tentare di difendere Gesù dalle accuse sostenute contro di lui dai giudei? Oppure, non abbandonò invece il Figlio di Dio al suo destino di morte sulla Croce? Lungo la linea del tempo, differenti risposte sarebbero state pronunciate in merito a queste domande, in modo tale che il prefetto di Roma sarebbe stato considerato, alternativamente, come un santo o come un vero e proprio servo del Nemico.

Ci siamo poi avventurati nei secoli del Medioevo, e abbiamo potuto rilevare come molte opere apocrife relative a Ponzio Pilato fossero in circolazione in Europa, frutto certamente di una fitta rete di narrazioni orali che venivano raccolte e fatte proprie da un pubblico assai vasto, appartenente a ogni livello sociale. Abbiamo visto come il prefetto della Giudea abbia percorso l'età medievale attraendo a sé un numero crescente di racconti leggendari concernenti la sua vita, le sue gesta, il giudizio finale al quale egli venne sottoposto da un imperatore ormai quasi cristianizzato, un ruolo interpretato da Tiberio o Vespasiano, e la sua morte.

E abbiamo visto, anche, come quei racconti fornissero molti dettagli a proposito del suo ultimo luogo di sepoltura.

In effetti, sussistono, nella tradizione, molti e diversi luoghi di sepoltura. E ognuno di questi luoghi risulta essere infestato da dèmoni.

Che si tratti del Tevere a Roma, o del fiume Rodano, che attraversa la città francese di Vienne, o di una palude o pozzo tra le Alpi svizzere, il corpo esecrando di Ponzio Pilato non è destinato a godere di un quieto riposo: i dèmoni attendono il suo arrivo e gioiscono in sua presenza, suscitando violente tempeste nel punto esatto in cui il prefetto dovrebbe, invece, eternamente giacere.

Tutto ciò è simile, estremamente simile a ciò che Antoine de la Sale ci racconta nel suo "Paradiso della Regina Sibilla", risalente alla prima metà del quattordicesimo secolo: in prossimità del Monte Sibilla, un Lago di Pilato ospitava esattamente la medesima storia, con l'aggiunta di un carro e di alcuni bufali, una tipica rappresentazione del Trionfo della Morte. E questa storia racconta delle stesse terribili tempeste.

Eppure, non esiste una singola opera manoscritta, appartenente alla tradizione medievale relativa al maledetto luogo di sepoltura di Ponzio Pilato, tra le quali "De Vita Pilati" e la "Legenda Aurea", che menzioni in alcun modo gli Appennini o la regione circostante il Monte Sibilla come uno dei sepolcri demoniaci di Ponzio Pilato.

La narrazione leggendaria è certamente la stessa; ma i Laghi di Pilato e i Monti Sibillini non sembrano essere parte di essa. Specialmente se andiamo a considerare come la più antica menzione del lago italiano a noi nota, rinvenibile nell'opera "Reductorium Morale" di Petrus Berchorius, racconti della presenza di dèmoni, ma allo stesso tempo non fornisca il benché minimo riferimento al nome di Pilato.

Perciò, abbiamo potuto concludere, è assai chiaro come quella leggenda non abbia affatto avuto origine in questi luoghi: è indubitabile come essa sia stata trapiantata presso questi laghi, profondamente incassati all'interno del circo glaciale del Monte Vettore, in qualità di materiale mitico sostanzialmente estraneo. E il trasferimento del mito ha avuto forse luogo intorno alla seconda metà del quattordicesimo secolo.

Ora, la domanda finale diventa: perché?














6 Sep 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /26. A dark presence was there before Pilate came
«I heard a remarkable, horrific tale about Norcia, the Italian town, that was reported to me as an absolutely proven truth by a certain prelate, a trustworthy person indeed among all men» (in the original Latin text: «Exemplum terribile esse circa Norciam Italie civitatem audivi pro vero et pro centies experto narrari a quodam praelato summe inter alios fide digno»).

This is the opening remark (Fig. 1) of a stunning excerpt found in a precious fourteenth-century manuscript: the “Reductorium Morale” by Petrus Berchorius (Pierre Bersuire), a French benedictine monk and abbot, who lived between 1290 and 1362 and was a member of the papal court in Avignon, known for his erudition and his learned literary works.

In our previous article “The Lake of Pilatus in an antique manuscript: Pierre Bersuire and the fourteenth century dark renown of Norcia's lake”, we already published this astounding excerpt (Book XIV, Chapter 30 “About Italy”) taken from one of the ancient manuscripts of the “Reductorium Morale”. Manuscript Latin 16786, preserved at the Bibliothèque Nationale de France, contains this most remarkable quote on the Lake of Norcia (also known today as the 'Lakes of Pilatus'): the parchment folia date to 1399, however Berchorius' text is much older, as it was probably written in 1335.

And, in this most ancient text, which precedes Antoine de la Sale's “The Paradise of Queen Sibyl” of more than a century, we find Norcia and its lake; however, we find no reference at all to Pontius Pilate (Fig. 2):

«Amid the peaks which raise near that town [Norcia] there is a lake, which from antique times is sacred to demons and conspicuously inhabited by them; today, no men but necromancers can get to the lake withouth being killed by the demons. Because of that, walls were built around the shore of the lake, and watched over by guards, lest necromancers be allowed to access the place to consecrate their books to the demons».

[In the original Latin text: «Inter montes isti civitati proximos esse lacum ab antiquis daemonibus consecratum et ab ipsis sensibiliter inhabitatum, ad quem nullus hodie praeter necromanticos potest accedere, quin a daemonibus occidat. Igitur circa terminos lacus facti sunt muri qui a custodibus servantur, ne necromantici pro liberis suis consecrandis daemonibus illuc accedere permittantur»].

As we can see, the earliest text we have about the Lakes of Pilate, written as early as the first half of the fourteenth century, does not convey the slightest reference to the name of Pontius Pilate and the legend connected to the burial of the body of the Roman prefect of Judaea into the Italian lake, as in later literary works, such as Antoine de la Sale's. Instead, it provides a most important confirmation: the lake was a place used to practice necromancy, because demons lived in there. And that was known since antiquity.

But Berchorius never writes the word 'Pilatus'. He goes straight to the inner nucleus of the lake's myth. And this nucleus is definitely dark (Fig. 3):

«And about that lake the most horrifying thing is what follows: each year that town [Norcia] sends a single man, a living man, beyond the walls that encircle the lake, as an offering to the demons, who immediately and in full view tear apart and slaughter that man; and people say that if the town does not comply, the country would be razed by the storms. Every year the town selects a certain criminal, and sends him there to the demons as a tribute».

[In the original Latin text: «Est ergo istud ibi summe terribile, quia civitas illa omni anno unum hominem vivum pro tributo infra ambitum murorum iuxta lacum ad daemones mittunt, qui statim visibiliter illum hominem lacerant et consumunt, quod (ut aiunt) si civitas non facet, patria tempestatibus deperiret. Civitas ergo annuatim aliquem sceleratum eligit que pro tributo daemonibus illuc mittit»].

What is the meaning of all that?

The meaning is thoroughly stunning.

We have a lake with demons in it, and devastating storms. Just like in the legendary tradition connected to the burial places (Vienne, the Rhône, Saint-Chamond, Lausanne) of the cursed body of Pontius Pilate.

But here, in the middle of the remote, sinister Sibillini Mountain Range, there is no Pilate. In the early fourteenth century, there was no need to add any Pontius Pilate to mark the lake of Norcia with an eerie touch (Fig. 4).

What Petrus Berchorius is telling us with in “Reductorium Morale” is that the lake sitting in the glacial cirque of Mount Vettore was already cursed by itself. It did have its own demons and tempests, with no necessity for further mythical explanations, like a plunge by a Roman prefect's dead body.

The legend of the lake of Norcia was already alive at that time, with no connection to Pontius Pilate and his elaborated medieval lore.

In ancient times, a sinister fascination already issued from what we know today as the Lakes of Pilate. And it had nothing to do with the Roman prefect of Judaea.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /26. Una presenza oscura dimorava qui prima dell'arrivo di Pilato
«Ho udito narrare un terribile racconto a proposito di Norcia, città d'Italia, riferitomi come cosa assolutamente vera e sicura da un certo prelato, persona sommamente attendibile tra tutti gli uomini» (nel testo originale latino: «Exemplum terribile esse circa Norciam Italie civitatem audivi pro vero et pro centies experto narrari a quodam praelato summe inter alios fide digno»).

È questa la frase iniziale (Fig. 1) di un testo straordinario, reperibile all'interno di un prezioso manoscritto risalente al quattordicesimo secolo: il "Reductorium Morale" di Petrus Berchorius (Pierre Bersuire), un monaco e abate benedettino francese, vissuto tra il 1290 e il 1362 e attivo presso la corte papale di Avignone, noto per la grande erudizione e la produzione di dotte opere letterarie.

Nel nostro precedente articolo "Il Lago di Pilato in un antico manoscritto: Pierre Bersuire e la tenebrosa fama del lago di Norcia nel quattordicesimo secolo", abbiamo già avuto occasione di pubblicare questo straordinario passaggio (Libro XIV, Capitolo 20 "Dell'Italia") tratto da uno degli antichi manosritti del "Reductorium Morale". Il manoscritto Latin 16786, conservato presso la Bibliothèque Nationale de France, contiene la più notevole menzione del Lago di Norcia (oggi noto con l'appellativo di "Laghi di Pilato"): i fogli di pergamena risalgono all'anno 1399, ma il testo di Berchorius è assai più antico, essendo stato vergato, probabilmente, nel 1335.

E, in questo testo molto antico, che precede di più di un secolo il "Paradiso della Regina Sibilla" di Antoine de la Sale, ci imbattiamo in Norcia e nel suo lago; eppure, in esso non appare alcun riferimento a Ponzio Pilato (Fig. 2):

«Tra le montagne che si innalzano in prossimità di questa città si trova un lago, dagli antichi consacrato ai dèmoni, e da questi visibilmente abitato, al quale oggi nessun uomo, ad eccezione dei negromanti, può accedere, senza che venga ucciso dai dèmoni. Per questo motivo, attorno al lago sono state costruite delle mura che sono sorvegliate da guardie, affinché non sia permesso ai negromanti di accedere a quel luogo per consacrare i propri libri ai dèmoni».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Inter montes isti civitati proximos esse lacum ab antiquis daemonibus consecratum et ab ipsis sensibiliter inhabitatum, ad quem nullus hodie praeter necromanticos potest accedere, quin a daemonibus occidat. Igitur circa terminos lacus facti sunt muri qui a custodibus servantur, ne necromantici pro liberis suis consecrandis daemonibus illuc accedere permittantur»].

Come possiamo vedere, il più antico testo a noi noto che si riferisca ai Laghi di Pilato, redatto non più tardi della prima metà del quattordicesimo secolo, non riporta il benché minimo riferimento al nome di Ponzio Pilato e alla leggenda collegata alla sepoltura del corpo del prefetto romano della Giudea in questo lago italiano, come invece appare in opere letterarie successive, come quella di Antoine de la Sale. Al contrario, questo testo ci fornisce un'importante conferma: il lago era un luogo utilizzato per l'effettuazione di pratiche negromantiche, a causa del fatto che in esso dimoravano dèmoni. E ciò sarebbe stato noto sin dall'antichità.

Ma Berchorius non scrive mai la parola 'Pilato'. Egli, invece, muove direttamente in direzione del nucleo più profondo della leggenda connessa a questo lago. E si tratta di un nucleo particolarmente tenebroso (Fig. 3):

«E questa è la cosa sommamente terribile di quel luogo: che quella città [Norcia], ogni anno, invia un singolo uomo, vivo, oltre le mura che circondano il lago, a modo di tributo per i dèmoni, i quali subito e visibilmente lo smembrano e lo divorano; e dicono che se la città non facesse questo, il suo territorio sarebbe devastato dalle tempeste. Ogni anno la città seleziona un qualche criminale, che poi invia in quel luogo come tributo per i dèmoni».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Est ergo istud ibi summe terribile, quia civitas illa omni anno unum hominem vivum pro tributo infra ambitum murorum iuxta lacum ad daemones mittunt, qui statim visibiliter illum hominem lacerant et consumunt, quod (ut aiunt) si civitas non facet, patria tempestatibus deperiret. Civitas ergo annuatim aliquem sceleratum eligit que pro tributo daemonibus illuc mittit»].

Quale è il significato di tutto ciò?

Il significato è assolutamente sorprendente.

Abbiamo un lago, abitato da dèmoni, e devastanti tempeste. Esattamente come nelle tradizioni leggendarie concernenti i luoghi di sepoltura (Vienne, il Rodanno, Saint-Chamond, Lausanne) del corpo maledetto di Ponzio Pilato.

Ma qui, nel mezzo degli isolati e sinistri Monti Sibillini, non c'è alcun Pilato. Nella prima metà del quattordicesimo secolo, non c'era alcuna necessità di utilizzare un Ponzio Pilato per aggiungere un tocco inquietante al lago di Norcia (Fig. 4).

Ciò che Petrus Berchorius ci sta dicendo con il suo "Reductorium Morale" è che quel lago celato all'interno del circo glaciale del Monte Vettore era già oggetto di una propria specifica e peculiare maledizione. Esso possedeva già i propri dèmoni e le proprie tempeste, senza alcuna esigenza di introdurre ulteriori motivi leggendari, quali il tuffo del cadavere di un antico prefetto romano.

La leggenda del lago di Norcia era già viva, senza alcuna connessione con Ponzio Pilato e con l'elaborata tradizione medievale che lo riguardava.

Nei tempi antichi, una fascinazione sinistra emergeva già da ciò che oggi conosciamo con il nome di Laghi di Pilato. E questa fascinazione non aveva nulla a che fare con il prefetto romano della Giudea.















































4 Sep 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /25. When an Italian lake became the 'Lake of Pilate'
In the preceding chapters, we saw that the Lakes of Pilate, the two icy, crystal-like surfaces set within the sinister glacial cirque of Mount Vettore, in the Sibillini Mountain Range, have harboured for centuries a gloomy legend connected to the figure of Pontius Pilate, the Roman prefect of Judaea at the time of the Passion. However, the tale which was narrated about the lakes, as reported by Antoine de la Sale in his “The Paradise of Queen Sibyl” (Fig. 1), was just a transplant of a medieval legend with an illustrious literary ancestry: a myth on Pilate's burial place that had its setting in different areas of Europe, far from the Italian central Apennines, which nothing had to do with those eerie, fascinating lakes.

Thus, the legend about Pilate was not originated in the Sibillini Mountain Range: at some time, during the centuries of the Middle Ages, it was adapted, through an elaboration carried out in Italy by oral tradition, to a specific lake sitting in the middle of the Italian Apennines.

But when did this re-working and adaptation process occur?

There are many clues which we may try to follow. Let's go into each one of them in detail.

The first clue is provided to us by thirteenth-century “Legenda Aurea”. This huge, most successful work contains the most recent and most comprehensive description of the legend that concerns Pontius Pilate, with the indication of the many legendary burial places for the prefect's cursed corpse: the Tiber, Vienne and the Rhône, Lausanne and the Alps. From the time of its publication onwards, often in gorgeous editions (Fig. 2), everybody in Europe became fully acquainted with the odd, frightful tale concerning the doom of the Roman prefect of Judaea. And the earliest manuscripts of the “Legenda Aurea” date back to the end of the thirteenth century, just before Jacobus de Varagine's death, which occurred in 1298.

The “Legenda” does not mention the Italian lake in the Sibillini Mountain Range as a burial place for Pilate. So, re-working of the legend, with its adaptation to the Apennines, should have taken place not earlier than the final decade of the thirteenth century, so as to skip any chance of inclusion in the latest versions of Jacobus' work.

A second clue is given by our well-known chariot with its pulling buffaloes. This is but a suggestive hypothesis; however, we cannot refrain from thinking that the Italian re-elaboration of the legend was indelibly and harrowingly imprinted by the ghastly recollection of the horrifying chariots full of dead bodies which were to be seen in the narrow streets of many Italian towns during the lethal, implacable plague that ravaged the peninsula from 1347 onwards (Fig. 3). This is a peculiar detail which is not present at all in the earlier “Legenda Aurea”, nor in any other relevant medieval text linked to the legend of Pilate, so we might envisage that the Italian version of the legend of Pontius Pilate was re-worked after the middle decades of the fourteenth century.

A third clue comes to us from a work written by a fourteenth-century poet from Tuscany: Fazio degli Uberti (Fig. 4).

Fazio's “Dittamondo”, written in the second half of the fourteenth century and never completed (the poet died in 1367), contains the earliest mention ever retrieved about the Lake of Pilate, set in what we know today as the Sibillini Mountain Range. And here is what our Tuscan poet says, as taken from manuscript Italien 81, preserved at the Bibliothèque Nationale de France (Fig. 5):

«I don't want to overlook the renown of the Mount of Pilate, where a lake is - which in summers is carefully guarded by watches on duty - because here Simon the Sorcerer ascends to consecrate his spellbook - so that troublesome tempests are aroused- according to what local people say».

[In the original Italian text: «la fama qui non vo’ rimagna nuda - del monte di pillato, dov’è il lago - che si guarda l'estate a muda a muda - però che qua s’intende in Simon mago - per sagrar il suo libro in su monta - onde tempesta poi con grande smago - secondo che per quei di là si conta»].

This is the first time in history that a reference to a lake named after Pontius Pilate, set between the town of Norcia and the Italian province of the Marche, is found in written literature.

The listed verses were written somewhere between 1350 and 1367. Again, we find ourselves in a time period not earlier than the second half of the fourteenth century.

Before 1350, we have nothing.

Or, better, we have something. Something that was written around 1335. But, in it, there isn't the slightest reference to Pontius Pilate.

Pontius Pilate in not mentioned at all. But that lake, it is mentioned indeed.

And this mention is the eeriest quote we might ever stumble upon.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /25. Quando un lago italiano diventò il 'Lago di Pilato'
Nei capitoli precedenti, abbiamo visto come i Laghi di Pilato, due specchi d'acqua gelida e cristallina posti all'interno del circo glaciale del Monte Vettore, tra i Monti Sibillini, abbiano accolto, per molti secoli, una tenebrosa leggenda collegata alla figura di Ponzio Pilato, il prefetto romano della Giudea in carica al tempo della Passione. Ma quel racconto, narrato a proposito di quei laghi, così come riferito da Antoine de la Sale nel suo "Paradiso della Regina Sibilla" (Fig. 1), non è che la dislocazione di una leggenda medievale caratterizzata da un'illustre ascendenza letteraria: un mito concernente il luogo in cui Pilato sarebbe stato sepolto, localizzato in diverse regioni d'Europa, ben lontane dagli Appennini dell'Italia centrale; una leggenda che nulla aveva a che fare con questi laghi sinistri e affascinanti.

È possibile perciò affermare come la leggenda di Pilato non si sia affatto originata presso i Monti Sibillini: c'è stato un tempo, nel corso dei secoli del Medioevo, nel quale essa, attraverso elaborazioni che hanno avuto luogo in Italia, su base orale, fu adattata a quello specifico lago nascosto nella sezione centrale degli Appennini italiani.

Ma quando può avere avuto luogo questo processo di rielaborazione e adattamento?

Ci sono molti indizi è possibile tentare di seguire. Analizziamo in dettaglio ciascuno di essi.

Il primo indizio ci viene fornito dalla "Legenda Aurea", risalente al tredicesimo secolo. Questa voluminosa opera, di grande successo, contiene la più recente ed esaustiva descrizione della leggenda che narra di Ponzio Pilato, con l'indicazione dei numerosi luoghi di sepoltura leggendari che avrebbero ospitato il corpo maledetto del prefetto: il Tevere, Vienne e il fiume Rodano, Losanna e le Alpi. A partire dall'epoca della sua prima diffusione, e rilanciata da manoscritti spesso di grande splendore artistico (Fig. 2), tutti in Europa furono posti a conoscenza di quello strano e pauroso racconto che narrava del terribile destino del prefetto romano della Giudea. E i più antichi manoscritto della "Legenda Aurea" risalgono alla fine del tredicesimo secolo, un periodo che precede la scomparsa di Jacopo da Varagine nel 1298.

La "Legenda" non cita affatto, tra i luoghi di sepoltura di Pilato, quel lago italiano nascosto tra le vette dei Monti Sibillini. E dunque, la rielaborazione della leggenda, con il suo adattamento agli Appennini, dovrebbe avere avuto luogo non prima della decade finale del tredicesimo secolo, in modo tale da sfuggire ad ogni inclusione nelle più tarde versioni della "Legenda" redatte da Jacopo.

Un secondo indizio è costituito dal nostro ormai famoso carro trainato da coppie di bufali. Ciò che segue non rappresenta che una suggestiva ipotesi: eppure, non possiamo trattenerci dal pensare che la rielaborazione italiana della leggenda sia stata indelebilmente e dolorosamente marcata dalla macabra memoria degli agghiaccianti carri ricolmi di cadaveri che si presentavano alla vista tra le strette strade di molte città d'Italia durante la letale, implacabile peste che devastò la penisola dal 1347 in poi (Fig. 3). Si tratta di un dettaglio assai peculiare che non è assolutamente rinvenibile all'interno della "Legenda Aurea", né in qualsivoglia altro testo medievale relativo alla leggenda di Pilato, essendo dunque possibile ipotizzare che la versione italiana della leggenda di Ponzio Pilato sia stata rielaborata successivamente alle decadi centrali del quattordicesimo secolo.

Un terzo indizio ci perviene da un'opera scritta dal poeta toscano Fazio degli Uberti, vissuto nel quattordicesimo secolo (Fig. 4).

Nel suo "Dittamondo", redatto nella seconda metà del quattodicesimo secolo e mai completato (il poeta morì nel 1367), appare ai nostri occhi la più antica menzione mai rinvenuta a proposito del Lago di Pilato, situato in ciò che oggi conosciamo con il nome di Monti Sibillini. Ed ecco ciò che il poeta toscano afferma, così come riportato nel manoscritto Italien 81, conservato presso la Bibliothèque Nationale de France (Fig. 5):

«La fama qui non vo’ rimagna nuda - del monte di pillato, dov’è il lago - che si guarda l'estate a muda a muda - però che qua s’intende in Simon mago - per sagrar il suo libro in su monta - onde tempesta poi con grande smago - secondo che per quei di là si conta».

È questa la prima volta nella storia in cui un riferimento a un lago intitolato a Ponzio Pilato, situato tra la città di Norcia e la regione italiana delle Marche, è rinvenibile in letteratura.

I versi citati sono stati scritti in un periodo compreso tra il 1350 e il 1367. Di nuovo, ci troviamo collocati in un periodo temporale non antecedente alla seconda metà del quattordicesimo secolo.

Prima del 1350, non abbiamo nulla.

O, meglio, abbiamo qualcosa. Qualcosa che fu scritto attorno al 1335. Ma, in esso, non è possibile trovare il benché minimo riferimento a Ponzio Pilato.

Ponzio Pilato non viene citato affatto. Invece, il lago viene menzionato in modo assolutamente esplicito.

E questa menzione rappresenta la più sinistra citazione nella quale sia mai stato possibile imbatterci.












































































>










>








3 Sep 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /24. Is this the end for a tale coming from elsewhere?
Now we are ready to confront with a most important question concerning the Sibillini Mountain Range, in Italy, and the Lakes of Pilate which are sitting beneath the dizzying crests of Mount Vettore, and in full view of Mount Sibyl, the focal point of another fascinating legend (Fig. 1).

The question, of course, can be stated as follows: did the tradition concerning the burial place of Pontius Pilate actually emerge, as a fully original, native tale, from the Italian Sibillini Mountain Range? Was this lore generated in this Italian mountainous region, or was it transplated there from some different cultural areas and geographic territories into that specific, particular spot of land?

Was the Pilate's legend born there, or has it come from somewhere else?

The answer is fully known to researchers, and Arturo Graf, the Italian scholar who wrote his fundamental article “A Pilate Mount in Italy” in the year 1893, had already it clear in his mind (Fig. 2).

Because the answer is quite straightforward: the Italian Lakes of Pilate are nothing else but the product of the transferral of Pontius Pilate's literary and oral tradition, which can be traced in a number of apocryphal texts whose original setting was in France and Switzerland, to a remote region of the Italian Apennines, where mysterious lakes stood, and still stand.

The cursed corpse of the prefect of Judaea has never been cast into the icy waters of the sinister lakes hidden within the glacial cirque of Mount Vettore. Or, better, the relevant tradition has nothing to do with those specific lakes.

We may remind the reader that, in a previous paper (“Birth of a Sibyl: the medieval connection”), we posed a same sort of question with relation to the Apennine Sibyl and her magical kingdom hidden beneath the Sibyl's peak. And the answer was quite the same: the lore concerning a Sibyl living in a mountain was born elesewhere, in far-away countries, as it showed significant connections with the Matter of Britain and the ancient literary characters of Morgan le Fay and her friend Sebile.

However, the search for an answer as to the case of the Apennine Sibyl was a harder task. With the Sibyl, the investigation required the identification, unfolding and final removal of a number of extraneous, additional narrative layers which concealed the true origin of the Italian legend about that Sibyl. Careful research was needed to find out the elements borrowed from several different mythical tales, so as to get to the true essence of the local legend.

In the present case, the task was much easier.

Since the very beginning, it was clear that Pontius Pilate featured a number of different legendary resting places, actually too many: a circumstance that manifestly hinted to a process of contamination which promoted a process of diffusion of the same legendary tale across different regions and territories. After having scrutinised the main available textual sources, and having determined that no one of them ever mentioned the Sibillini Mountain Range, it became apparent that the Lakes of Pilate in Italy had just inherited a legend that was rooted elsewhere in Europe, namely Vienne and the river Rhône in France, with a specific link to the place of exile of Herod Archelaus as quoted by first-century historian Flavius Josephus, and then Rome and its river Tiber, Saint-Chamond and its Massif de Pilat in the region of Vienne, and then Lausanne and Lucerne in Switzerland, with the Tomlishorn, or Mont Pilate.

Therefore, the Lakes of Pilate in Italy have nothing to do with the legend of Pontius Pilate, the way it has been developing itself across the oral and literary tradition throughout more than a thousand years.

What Antoine de la Sale found on May 18th, 1420 during his visit to the Sibillini Mountain Range, was no original legend: it was rather a transplant of a foreign legendary tale into the sinister setting of that specific portion of the Italian Apennines which raises between the provinces of Umbria and Marche.

Pontius Pilate lived and died elsewhere. He never came to Mount Vettore on a chariot drawn by black, demonic buffaloes. Neither in actual truth nor in the original core of the legend.

However, is this the end of our story?

Are we going a road that is about to lead us to a melancholic ending, with a desolate abasement of the Lakes of Pilate, from a thrilling mystery to a mere variant of a legend that belongs to other lands?

Are those lakes now exposed as bare water basins, deprived of all their eerie fascination? (Fig. 3)

Is that the end of the legend of the Lakes of Pilate?

The answer to all these questions is the same as already provided with relation to the Apennine Sibyl in our previous paper “Birth of a Sibyl: the medieval connection”.

The answer in no. This is not the end. The enigma is still there, and it thrives with all its dark, sinister glow over the remote peaks of the Sibillini Mountain Range. At the very center of Italy.

As we will see in the final section of this paper.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /24. È questa la fine per un racconto che nasce altrove?
Siamo ora pronti per affrontare la domanda fondamentale che riguarda i Monti Sibillini, in Italia, e i Laghi di Pilato, posti al di sotto delle vette precipiti del Monte Vettore, e in piena linea di vista con il Monte Sibilla, il punto focale di un'altra affascinante leggenda (Fig. 1).

La domanda, naturalmente, può essere enunciata in questo modo: la tradizione concernente il luogo di sepoltura di Ponzio Pilato è veramente sorta tra i Monti Sibillini, in qualità di racconto originale, nativo di questi territori? Questa leggenda è realmente nata in questa regione montuosa d'Italia, oppure è stata trasferita qui, partendo da altre e diverse aree culturali e geografiche, radicandosi in questo specifico, particolarissimo lembo di terra italiana?

La leggenda di Pilato è nata qui, o è giunta qui partendo da luoghi lontani?

Nel mondo della ricerca, la risposta è già ben conosciuta, e Arturo Graf, lo studioso italiano che scrisse, nel 1893, un articolo fondamentale su questo tema, aveva la questione già ben chiara in mente (Fig. 2).

Perché la risposta è assolutamente cristallina: i Laghi di Pilato, in Italia, non costituiscono altro che il prodotto del trasferimento della tradizione letteraria e orale relativa a Ponzio Pilato - tradizione che può essere agevolmente reperita in una serie di testi apocrifi originariamente ambientati in Francia e Svizzera - fino a una remota regione degli Appennini italiani, dove si trovavano due misteriosi laghi, ancora oggi presenti.

Il corpo maledetto del prefetto della Giudea non è mai stato gettato nelle gelide acque dei sinistri laghi celati all'interno del circo glaciale del Monte Vettore. O, meglio, la relativa tradizione non ha nulla a che fare con questi specifici laghi.

Dobbiamo ricordare come, in un precedente articolo, ("Nascita di una Sibilla: la traccia medievale") ci eravamo trovati ad affrontare una questione assai simile, relativa alla Sibilla Appenninica e al suo magico regno nascosto al di sotto della vetta del Monte Sibilla. E quella questione presentava analoga natura: la tradizione connessa a una Sibilla che vivrebbe all'interno di una montagna è nata, in realtà, altrove, in territori molto distanti, essendo rinvenibili significativi legami con la Materia di Bretagna e gli antichi personaggi di Morgana la Fata e della sua compagna Sebile.

Eppure, nel caso della Sibilla Appenninica la ricerca di una risposta non era stata affatto semplice. In relazione alla Sibilla, l'investigazione aveva richiesto l'identificazione, la discriminazione e infine la rimozione di un certo numero di livelli narrativi aggiuntivi ed estranei, i quali contribuivano a nascondere la vera origine della leggenda sibillina italiana. Era stato dunque necessario condurre una attenta ricerca al fine di individuare gli elementi presi a prestito da altre e diverse narrazioni mitiche, in modo da potere accedere, infine, all'essenza più vera della leggenda locale.

In questo caso, invece, il compito è stato molto più facile.

Fin dall'inizio, è stato infatti chiaro come Ponzio Pilato presentasse una molteplicità di differenti, leggendari luoghi di sepoltura, in effetti in quantità eccessiva: una circostanza che allude in modo palese a un processo di contaminazione che ha causato la diffusione del medesimo racconto leggendario attraverso regioni e territori diversi. Dopo avere preso in esame le principali fonti testuali disponibili, e dopo avere determinato come nessuna di queste fonti menzionasse in alcun modo i Monti Sibillini, è divenuto chiaro come i Laghi di Pilato, in Italia, abbiano semplicemente ereditato una leggenda la cui origine è radicata altrove in Europa, e segnatamente a Vienne, presso il fiume Rodano, in Francia, in specifica connessione con il luogo d'esilio di Erode Archelao così come menzionato dallo storico del primo secolo Flavio Giuseppe, e poi a Roma e presso il Tevere, e poi Saint-Chamond e il suo Massif de Pilat, nella stessa regione di Vienne, e infine Losanna e Lucerna, in Svizzera, con il Tomlishorn, o Mont Pilate.

In definitiva, i Laghi di Pilato, in Italia, non hanno nulla a che fare con la leggenda di Ponzio Pilato, nel modo in cui essa è andata sviluppandosi nella tradizione letteraria e orale attraverso più di un millennio.

Ciò che Antoine de la Sale trovò, quel 18 maggio 1420, durante la sua visita ai Monti Sibillini, non era affatto una leggenda originaria di quei luoghi: si trattava piuttosto del trapianto di un racconto leggendario, proveniente da terre straniere, fino a quei sinistri scenari, costituenti una porzione degli Appennini italiani collocati tra l'Umbria e le Marche.

Ponzio Pilato visse e morì altrove. Egli non giunse mai presso il Monte Vettore su di un carro trainato da neri, demoniaci bufali. Né nella realtà, né nel nucleo originale di questa leggenda.

È allora questa la fine della nostra storia?

Stiamo forse percorrendo la strada che conduce verso una malinconica conclusione, con la triste retrocessione dei Laghi di Pilato da eccitante mistero a mera variante di una leggenda nata in altri luoghi?

Stiamo riducendo questi laghi a semplici contenitori d'acqua, privati ora di ogni tenebrosa, inquietante fascinazione? (Fig. 3)

È dunque questa la fine della leggenda dei Laghi di Pilato?

La risposta a tutte queste domande è la stessa da noi già fornita, nel nostro precedente articolo "Nascita di una Sibilla: la traccia medievale", in relazione alla Sibilla Appenninica.

La risposta è no. Questa non è affatto la fine. L'enigma è ancora lì, e continua a vibrare con tutto il suo oscuro, sinistro bagliore, al di sopra dei picchi remoti dei Monti Sibillini. Nel cuore dell'Italia.

Come vedremo nella parte conclusiva di questo lavoro di ricerca.



















































30 Aug 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /23. The chariot, the buffaloes and the Triumph of Death
«Furthermore people said that when Pilate saw that there was no way left for him to save his own life, he asked to be granted a last wish, which was accorded to him: he demanded that after his death his body be placed on a chariot drawn by two pairs of buffaloes and allowed to wander wherever the buffaloes may lead it. And they tell this is what was actually done».

[In the original French text: «Encores disent les gens que quant pilate vit que de sa vie ny avoit nul remede plus, il supplia un don qui lui fut accorde alors requist que apres sa mort son corps feust mis sur un char attelle de deux paires de buffles et feust laissie aler la ou laventure des buffles le porteroit et ainsi dient que fut fait»].

This is the weird vision depicted by Antoine de la Sale in his “The Paradise of Queen Sibyl”, as he describes the tales on the Lakes of Pilate reported to him by the local peasants. A vision that the French writer intends to fully convey to his audience: the chariot, the buffaloes and the bleeding, loathsome corpse of the Roman prefect are portrayed in a miniature contained in manuscript no. 0653 (0924) preserved at Chantilly, France (folium 4r), as they slowly proceed in a sort of ghastly parade up the mountain-side to reach the looming waters of the lake (Fig. 1).

«The buffaloes», continues de la Sale, «reached the shore of this lake and threw themselves into the waters together with all the chariot and Pilate's corpse [...]. And this is the reason for which this lake is called after Pilate» (in the original French text: «les bouffles vindrent au bourt de ce lac si se bouterent a tout le chair et le corps de pilate dedens [...]. Et pour ceste raison est dit le lac de pilate»).

Why does the legendary tale mention such a chariot? Why is it pulled by buffaloes? What is the meaning of such bizarre image?

We must note that all the ancient sources we perused with relation to the legendary tale of Pilate and his death do not provide any mention as to the journey of the corpse of the Roman prefect from Rome, to Vienne and the river Rhône in France, and finally to the Swiss Alps. If we open the pages of the “Legenda Aurea”, which includes all the listed steps of the ghastly travel, we only read that people moved the dead body from one resting place to the next one, and no detail on the transportation arrangements is provided (only generic verbs such as «deportaverunt», «commiserunt», «removerunt» are used, to signify that people simply took the corpse and brought it away to another place). And we find nothing in other texts as well, like “De Vita Pilati”.

No chariot nor buffaloes ever appear in previous sources which contain descriptions of the death of Pontius Pilate.

So why they are here?

Why the cursed corpse of a dead Pilate is brought from Rome to its resting place by this grim apparatus?

This does not happen by mere chance. As we will explain in this very article for the first time ever, this is a vision of the “Triumph of Death”.

Throughout the Middle Ages, the terror inspired by the inescapability of death, often in the horrible forms of plague, war and famine, was materialized in many pictorial representations of a victorious Death, crushing all living beings under its merciless curse. Death was portrayed in manuscripts, frescoes and tapestries in the act of taking the lives of all sorts of people, belonging to all social classes. Coming all of a sudden, Death was depicted by using several different narrative schemes, often morbid and grotesque, which were intended to arouse a dreadful awe in the beholders.

And, in many instances, especially in the late Middle Ages, triumphant Death arrived on a chariot led by couples of buffaloes.

A horrifying miniature is contained in manuscript Italien 545, preserved at the Bibliothèque Nationale de France, which contains the “Triumphs” by Petrarch, the illustrious Italian poet who lived in the fourteenth century. At folium 30v, we find a pictorial representation of the “Triumphus Mortis”: two black, fiendish buffaloes draw a triumphal carriage, on which Death holding a long lethal scythe stands. Beneath the hoofs of the animals, heaps of trampled bodies are crushed by the advancing, merciless wheels. The chariot is a sort of coffin, from which the spine-chilling laugh of the implacable skeleton runs across the countryside, while black demons bring away with them the souls of the dead (Fig. 2).

Another appalling image can be retrieved in manuscript no. 905 preserved at the Biblioteca Trivulziana in Milan. The fifteenth-century miniature which is found at folium 171v portrays, again from Petrarch's “Triumphs”, a triumphant Death, standing on its chariot, in the form of an antique sarcophagus, drawn by two buffaloes whose colour is as black as ultimate, eternal darkness (Fig. 3).

In manuscript Harley 2953 preserved at the British Library in London and dating to the first half of the sixteenth century, at folium 20 we find once more four skinny buffaloes, hellish and repulsive creatures, and the chariot of Death, crushing the mortals beneath its wheels, as it triumphantly proceeds and demons in the background snatch human souls away (Fig. 4).

And another instance we find in a large tapestry dating to 1507, now at the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, and again inspired to Petrach's “Triumphs”. In this complex allegorical scene, the four buffaloes draw a chariot on which a conquered Chastity lies, while the three Fates Atropos, Lachesis and Clotho, who represent Death, are in turn overwhelmed by Fame (Fig. 5).

Many other instances of the chariot of Death can be found in other sources (e.g. Codex Palatinus 192 preserved at the Biblioteca Nazionale in Florence, folium 22r), often with reference to Petrarch and his work. It is most natural that animal-drawn hearses were used during the Middle Ages to convey dead persons to their burial places, and that oxen and domesticated buffaloes were preferred owing to their strength, slow though unrelenting pace, and reliable behaviour, especially when raging plague claimed large number of lives.

But what it is important to stress here is that, in this Italian variant of the legend of Pontius Pilate, the former prefect of Judaea, after his death in Rome, is taken in charge by Death itself. A triumphant Death, featuring its own peculiar signs: the chariot, a wheeled coffin which brings the dead to its final destination; and the buffaloes, the servants of the Grim Reaper, which inexorably proceed until they get to their final destination, a ghastly burial place.

A place where demons are waiting for the arrival of their prey. As it always appears in the ancient representations of the “Triumph of Death”. And as it always happens at Pontius Pilate's burial places, wherever they are set according to legend.

Here is the reason for the buffaloes and the chariot depicted by Antoine de la Sale. Pilate is escorted to his doom amid the Sibillini Mountain Range. And it is accompanied there with the most lugubrious, the most gruesome magnificence.

Why is this image present only in this Italian version of the legend? Why doesn't it show up in the standard, basically northern-European sources we have been perusing in the previous articles?

Possibly, Italy was embued with the morbid taste for Death as presented by two major Italian authors who were active in the fourteenth century: Francesco Petrarch, whose “Triumphs” we already considered, and Giovanni Boccaccio, with his grisly description of the plague as contained in the “Decameron”. Possibly, in the Italian peninsula the chariot of Death was a known, almost popular image, as it was connected to the many artistic representations of Petrarch's “Triumphs” presented in several manuscripts and perhaps illustrated to frightened audiences in churches. Possibly, the oral tradition which developed in Italy found it appropriate and fascinating that an important personage like Pontius Pilate be accompanyied to his doom by Death herself.

We must also remember that not many decades had passed since Black Death struck Europe and Italy in the years 1347-1352: the vision of ox-drawn carriages slowly passing by along the narrow streets of the medieval towns, loaded to their full capacity with heaps and heaps of corpses ravaged by the loathsome marks of the plague, still lingered in the eyes of the people (and in the eyes of Petrach himself, who fully lived those appalling years and was hardly hit by multiple grievous losses), as an actual token of the Triumph of Death on earth. A vision that could not be included in the “Legenda Aurea”, written more than fifty years earlier, but able to assert all its grisly potential as an allegoric apparatus which was effectively integrated, some seventy years later, within the tale concerning the Lakes of Pilate in central Italy.

Thus, as a matter of fact, according to Antoine de la Sale's account, Pontius Pilate is brought to his fiendish burial place set withing the glacial cirque of Mount Vettore by the chariot of Death.

And this must be considered as a wholly original feature of the Sibillini Mountain Range's version of the legend of Pilate.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /23. Il carro, i bufali e il Trionfo della Morte
«Inoltre, la gente dice che quando Pilato vide che la sua vita era ormai perduta, egli chiese che fosse esaudita una sua volontà, cosa che gli fu accordata: egli domandò che, dopo la sua morte, il suo corpo fosse posto su di un carro tirato da due coppie di bufali, e che esso fosse lasciato vagare là dove i bufali potessero portarlo. E così dicono che fu fatto».

[Nel testo originale francese: «Encores disent les gens que quant pilate vit que de sa vie ny avoit nul remede plus, il supplia un don qui lui fut accorde alors requist que apres sa mort son corps feust mis sur un char attelle de deux paires de buffles et feust laissie aler la ou laventure des buffles le porteroit et ainsi dient que fut fait»].

È questa la strana, lugubre visione dipinta da Antoine de la Sale nel suo "Il Paradiso della Regina Sibilla", nella parte in cui egli ci descrive i racconti che narrano del Lago di Pilato, così come riferitigli dalla gente del luogo. Una visione che l'autore provenzale intende rappresentare ai propri lettori in tutta la sua agghiacciante potenza: il carro, i bufali e il corpo sanguinante, immondo del prefetto romano sono raffigurati in una delle miniature contenute nel manoscritto n. 0653 (0924) conservato a Chantilly, in Francia (folium 4r), mentre essi procedono lentamente, in una sorta di macabra processione, su per il fianco della montagna, diretti verso le acque incombenti del lago (Fig. 1).

«I bufali», continua de la Sale, «arrivarono ai bordi di questo lago e si gettarono nelle sue acque insieme a tutto il carro e al corpo di Pilato [...]. E per questo motivo il lago è detto di Pilato» (nel testo originale francese: «Mais l'empereur qui se esmerveilla de ceste requeste si voult scavoir ou le chair adresseroit si le fist suir tant que les bouffles vindrent au bourt de ce lac si se bouterent a tout le chair et le corps de pilate dedens [...]. Et pour ceste raison est dit le lac de pilate»).

Perché nel racconto leggendario viene menzionato questo strano carro? Perché esso viene trainato da bufali? Quale può essere il significato di questa immagine, così apparentemente bizzarra?

Ripetiamo, ancora una volta, come nessuna delle fonti antiche da noi consultate in relazione alla leggenda di Pilato e della sua morte fornisca alcuna menzione in merito al viaggio del cadavere del prefetto romano da Roma a Vienne, e al fiume Rodano, in Francia, per arrivare infine alle Alpi svizzere. Se andiamo ad apire le pagine della "Legenda Aurea", che include tutte le tappe qui sopra citate, compiute da Pilato nel corso del suo macabro viaggio, possiamo solamente leggere che le genti del luogo provvedevano a rimuovere le spoglie mortali del prefetto da un luogo di sepoltura al successivo, ma nessun dettaglio sul trasporto viene mai delineato (sono infatti utilizzati solamente verbi generici quali «deportaverunt», «commiserunt», «removerunt», a significare che quel corpo veniva semplicemente preso e trasportato in un luogo diverso). E nulla è possibile reperire nemmeno negli altri testi da noi analizzati, quali la "De Vita Pilati".

Nessun carro e nessun bufalo compaiono mai in nessuna delle fonti più antiche contenenti descrizioni della morte di Ponzio Pilato.

E allora, perché quel carro e quei bufali si trovano qui?

Perché il corpo maledetto di un Pilato ormai morto viene trasportato da Roma al suo luogo di sepoltura per mezzo di questo lugubre apparato?

Tutto ciò non accade per una mera casualità. Come andremo a spiegare in questo stesso articolo, per la prima volta in assoluto, si tratta, invece, di una visione del "Trionfo della Morte".

Attraverso tutto il Medioevo, il terrore ispirato dall'inevitabilità della morte, che spesso si concretizzava nelle forme orribili della peste, della guerra e della fame, veniva materializzato nelle rappresentazioni pittoriche come la Morte vittoriosa, che schiaccia tutti gli esseri viventi sotto la propria implacabile maledizione. La Morte, personificata, veniva raffigurata in manoscritti, affreschi e arazzi nell'atto di ghermire le vite di persone di ogni genere, appartenenti a ogni classe sociale, calando all'improvviso; e queste raffigurazioni erano solite seguire vari schemi narrativi, spesso morbosi e grotteschi, che si ponevano l'obiettivo di suscitare un profondo terrore tra coloro che si fossero trovati a osservarle.

E, in molti esempi, in particolare tardo-medievali, la Morte trionfante arrivava su di un carro trainato da una coppia di bufali.

Una terrificante miniatura è contenuta nel manoscritto Italien 545, conservato presso la Bibliothèque Nationale de France, e nel quale sono contenuti i "Trionfi" di Francesco Petrarca, il grande poeta italiano vissuto nel quattordicesimo secolo. Al folium 30v, troviamo una rappresentazione pittorica del “Triumphus Mortis”: due bufali, neri, demoniaci, trascinano un carro trionfale, sul quale si erge la Morte, una lunga e letale falce tra le mani. Tra gli zoccoli degli animali, mucchi di corpi calpestati vengono schiacciati dalle ruote che avanzano inesorabili. Il carro stesso è una sorta di feretro, dal quale la risata raccapricciante dell'implacabile scheletro invade la campagna, mentre dèmoni neri trascinano via le anime dei deceduti (Fig. 2).

Un'altra immagine agghiacciante può essere rinvenuta nel manoscritto n. 905 conservato presso la Biblioteca Trivulziana a Milano. La miniatura, eseguita nel quindicesimo secolo, si trova al folium 171v e ritrae, ancora una volta dai “Trionfi” del Petrarca, una Morte trionfante, in piedi sul proprio carro, il quale ha la forma di un antico sarcofago, trainato da due bufali, oscuri quanto l'eterna tenebra finale (Fig. 3).

Nel manoscritto Harley 2953, conservato presso la British Library a Londra e risalente alla prima metà del sedicesimo secolo, al folium 20 troviamo nuovamente quattro scheletrici bufali, creature infernali e repellenti, e il carro della Morte, che schiaccia i mortali sotto le grandi ruote, mentre avanza trionfalmente e i dèmoni sullo sfondo si impadroniscono delle anime degli uomini per trascinarle via (Fig. 4).

E un altro esempio è reperibile in un grande arazzo databile al 1507, oggi al Rijksmuseum di Amsterdam, ancora ispirato ai "Trionfi" del Petrarca. In questa complessa scena allegorica, i quattro bufali trascinano un carro sul quale giace Castità vinta e conquistata, mentre le tre Moire Atropo, Lachesi e Cloto, che rappresentano la Morte, sono a propria volta sconfitte dalla Fama (Fig. 5).

Molti altri esempi del carro della Morte possono essere rinvenuti in altre fonti (es. nel Codex Palatinus 192 conservato presso la Biblioteca Nazionale a Firenze, al folium 22r), spesso in riferimento al Petrarca e alla sua opera. È, ovviamente, assolutamente naturale che carri funebri a trazione animale fossero utilizzati durante il Medioevo per il trasporto dei deceduti fino al luogo stabilito per la sepoltura, e che buoi o bufali addomesticati potessero essere preferiti a motivo della loro forza, dell'andatura lenta ma inesorabile, e del comportamento assai affidabile, in special modo quando la peste dilagante reclamava spaventose quantità di vite.

Ma ciò che è importante rimarcare in questa sede è che, in questa variante italiana della leggenda di Ponzio Pilato, l'antico prefetto della Giudea, dopo il decesso a Roma, viene preso in carico dalla Morte stessa. Una Morte trionfante, caratterizzata dai suoi peculiari emblemi: il carro, un feretro dotato di ruote che trasporta il defunto fino alla sua destinazione finale; e i bufali, i servi della Trista Mietitrice, che procedono inesorabilmente finché non raggiungono il macabro luogo di sepoltura.

Un luogo presso il quale i dèmoni stanno attendendo l'arrivo della loro preda. Come sempre accade nelle antiche rappresentazioni del "Trionfo della Morte". E come sempre accade presso i luoghi di sepoltura di Ponzio Pilato, ovunque essi si trovino secondo quanto narrato dalla leggenda.

Ecco dunque il motivo della presenza dei bufali e di quel carro, descritti da Antoine de la Sale. Pilato è condotto, o meglio scortato, verso la propria maledizione, in un luogo situato tra i Monti Sibillini. E viene accompagnato fin lì con la più lugubre, la più raccapricciante magnificenza.

Perché questa immagine è presente solamente in questa versione italiana della leggenda? Perché essa non appare nelle fonti standard, sostanzialmente nordeuropee, che abbiamo avuto modo di consultare nei precedenti articoli?

Probabilmente, l'Italia era imbevuta del gusto macabro per la Morte, così come essa era stata rappresentata da due fondamentali autori italiani del quattordicesimo secolo: Francesco Petrarca, del quale abbiamo avuto modo di considerare i "Trionfi", e Giovanni Boccaccio, con le sue crude descrizioni della peste nel "Decameron". Forse, nella penisola italiana, il carro della Morte costituiva un'immagine conosciuta e popolare, essendo collegata alle molteplici rappresentazioni artistiche dei "Trionfi" petrarcheschi, presenti in vari manoscritti e assai probabilmente da mostrarsi anche ai fedeli intimoriti nelle chiese. Probabilmente, la tradizione orale sviluppatasi in Italia deve avere trovato particolarmente appropriato e affascinante il fatto che un personaggio importante come Ponzio Pilato fosse accompagnato verso la propria perdizione dalla Morte stessa.

Dobbiamo anche ricordare come non molti decenni fossero trascorsi dal tempo in cui la Morte Nera aveva colpito l'Europa e l'Italia negli anni 1347-1352: la visione di carri trainati da buoi, in lento transito lungo le strette strade delle città del Medioevo, ricolmi fino all'altezza delle sponde di mucchi e mucchi di cadaveri devastati dalle orrende stigmate della peste, ancora permaneva negli occhi della gente (e in quelli dello stesso Petrarca, che visse pienamente quegli anni funesti e fu tragicamente colpito da molteplici lutti personali), come un segno concreto e tangibile del Trionfo della Morte sulla terra. Una visione che non avrebbe potuto essere inclusa nella "Legenda Aurea", scritta più di cinquanta anni prima, ma capace, invece, di esplicare tutto il proprio lugubre potenziale in qualità di agghiacciante apparato allegorico, che fu effettivamente integrato, circa settanta anni più tardi, all'interno della narrazione concernente i Laghi di Pilato nell'Italia centrale.

E così, a tutti gli effetti, nel racconto di Antoine de la Sale, Ponzio Pilato viene condotto verso il proprio demoniaco luogo di sepoltura, posto all'interno del circo glaciale del Monte Vettore, dal carro della Morte.

E, questo, costituisce un elemento assolutamente originale di questa versione, legata ai Monti Sibillini, della leggenda di Pilato.









































































































27 Aug 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /22. The Apennine variant of an ancient lore
In the previous chapters, we saw that no medieval reference exists that may establish a link between the legend of Pontius Pilate and the Sibillini Mountain Range in Italy.

As an actual fact, according to the known sources of the legend, Pilate was buried in many different places, but no one of them is situated in the mountainous chain which is part of the Italian Apennines.

However, in the year 1420 Antoine de la Sale, in his “Paradise of Queen Sibyl”, provides a testimony to the fact that the gloomy legend of Pontius Pilate had reached the Sibillini Mountain Range, and had unmistakably established there (Fig. 1).

«Tales are told», writes Antoine de la Sale, «that when Titus son of Vespasian, the Emperor of Rome, had crushed down the town of Jerusalem, which some say that it was made to avenge the death of Our Lord Jesus Christ [...] when he came back to Rome he brought with him Pilate who at that time was an officier at the said town of Jerusalem». To our experienced ears, the above sentences sound as something we have already heard of: it is the tale we read in the "Legenda Aurea" and "De Vita Pilati" and the "Paradosis Pilati" and the "Vindicta Salvatoris", and other apocryphal texts. And it is not by a casual chance that the French author echoes the name of that same Vespasian who is also mentioned in the “Vindicta”, even though this Emperor was not a contemporary of the Roman prefect: same sources, same historical mistakes.

It is clear that when Antoine de la Sale reported the tales told to him by the local people of the Sibillini Mountain Range, he was listening to one of the many variants of the mythical tale concerning Pontius Pilate and his execrable body, a limb of the Fiend as first expressed by Pope Gregory I at the end of the sixth century. The tale was the same, but the place - the Sibillini Mountain Range - was not one of the canonical burial sites listed in well-known sources such as the “Legenda Aurea”.

Unequivocally enough, in a significant passage of the “Paradise of Queen Sibyl”, Antoine de la Sale mentions the very rationale of the whole mythical tale which narrates of Pontius Pilate as we know it from the most ancient sources, dating back to the earliest centuries of Christianity:

«He [the Emperor] decided to put him to death on the ground that Pilate had not intended to sentence our true saviour Jesus Christ, yet he had failed in his duty to preserve him from death».

[In the original French text: «Il [l'empereur] le fist mourir suppose que pillate ne voullist oncques condampner nostredit vray sauveur Jhesuscrist mais pour ce quil ne fist son devoir a le garantir de mort»].

This is the very core of the mythical guilt of Pontius Pilate, as we read in the “Paradosis Pilati” («you should have guarded him [Jesus] from the Jews»), in the “Rescriptum Tiberii” («just as you condemned this one unjustly and delivered him to death»), in the words written by Eusebius of Caesarea («Pilate himself, who was an unjust judge to the Saviour») and Aurelius Ambrosius («a judge must never give in to malevolence or fear, lest he barters innocent blood [...] He did not restrain from uttering an unholy sentence»): the Roman governor chose not to preserve the life of Jesus Christ and, out of fear and cowardice, showed Him the way to the Cross.

Again, the tale we find amid the Sibillini Mountain Range, in Italy, at the beginning of the fifteenth century, belongs to the very same corpus of legendary traditions which make up the ancient lore about Pontius Pilate, his guilt, his death, his burial places.

And the account retrieved by Antoine de la Sale in this remote corner of Italy in the year 1420 contains another fundamental element which is a characteristic mark of the whole legend about the Roman prefect.

The lake, continues de la Sale, «is strictly guarded [...] on the ground that when anybody comes to it covertly and performs the art of the Fiend, after the operation is made a storm so violent raises in the region that all crops and goods in the country get spoiled» (Fig. 2).

This is nothing less than a clear reference to one of the central traits of the traditional legend concerning the cursed body of Pilate: the demons arousing frightful storms around his corpse.

In fact, we saw that both the river Tiber and the river Rhône were commoted and stirred by the presence of the dead prefect, with legions of rejoicing demons arousing tempests, lightnings, thunders and hail. Furthermore, storms and flames were issued from the pit in the Alps, too, in which the corpse had been cast, a collection of «deceptive illusions» («dyabolicae machinationes») created by the Fiend, as portrayed in the "Legenda Aurea". So, we can confidently state that the legendary material reported to the French gentleman by the local people is basically the same we already encountered in the Pilate's legendary tale.

But it is the whole narrative reported by Antoine de la Sale which is fully immersed in the traditional literary lore concerning Pilatus. It is the French writer himself who quotes a number of passages taken from Paulus Orosius, including the well-known excerpt which mentions the most famous report written by Pilate to his Emperor Tiberius in Rome, for centuries a main mythical item within the legend and lore concerning the Roman prefect:

«As Orosius reports in the second chapter of his eighth book, in which he says that after the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ Pilate sent to the said Tiberius the grand and amazing news about the trial, death and resurrection of a person called Jesus of Nazareth...».

[In the original French text: «Sicomme dit Orose ou second chappitre de son viii livre qui disioit que apres la mort et la resurrection de Jhesucrist pilate envoya au dit thibere cesar les treshaultes et merveilleuses nouvelles et le proces de la mort et resurrection du nomme Jhesus de Nazaret...»].

Thus, with Antoine de la Sale's “Paradise of Queen Sibyl” we are facing one of the variants of a legendary tale which has journeyed through the millennia. A tale which concerns Pontius Pilate, his key role in the Passion of Jesus Christ, his unforgivable guilt and his final punishment, which continues after his own death. A variant of the tale which has been set, for some reasons, in the icy lakes hidden within the peaks of the Sibillini Mountain Range, in Italy (Fig. 3).

However, before we proceed further, there is one additional, discordant element we need to address.

In Antoine de la Sale's account, a chariot appears, drawn by two pairs of buffaloes. On the chariot, the dead body of Pilate lies, as it travels to his final destination of doom and curse (Fig. 4).

A lugubrious, blood-curdling vision of death. A vision we have never encountered before in any of the ancient sources which are part of the legendary tale of Pontius Pilate.

What is this chariot? Why is it here? And why is it drawn by buffaloes? What has all that to do with Pilate and his gloomy legend?

For the first time ever, we will unveil the meaning of this odd, disturbing image. An image in which death plays a major part. As we will see in the next article.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /22. La variante appenninica di un racconto antico
Nei precedenti capitoli, abbiamo visto come non sia rinvenibile alcun riferimento di epoca medievale che possa stabilire una connessione tra la leggenda di Ponzio Pilato e i Monti Sibillini in Italia.

È un dato di fatto come, secondo tutte le fonti conosciute della leggenda, Pilato sia stato sepolto in molti luoghi differenti, ma nessuno di questi appaia essere situato all'interno di una catena montuosa che è parte degli Appennini italiani.

Nondimeno, nell'anno 1420 Antoine de la Sale, nel suo "Paradiso della Regina Sibilla", rende una precisa testimonianza in merito al fatto che la tenebrosa leggenda di Ponzio Pilato aveva raggiunto i Monti Sibillini, e si era inequivocabilmente stabilita in quei luoghi (Fig. 1).

«Si narra», scrive Antoine de la Sale, «che quando Tito, figlio di Vespasiano, ebbe distrutto la città di Gerusalemme, cosa che alcuni affermano sia stata compiuta per vendicare la morte di Nostro Signore Gesù Cristo [...] quando egli ritornò a Roma, portò con sé Pilato, che a quel tempo era governatore presso la detta città di Gerusalemme». Alle nostre orecchie ormai esperte, queste frasi suonano come già sentite: è il racconto che abbiamo avuto modo di leggere nella "Legenda Aurea" e nella "Paradosis Pilati" e nella "Vindicta Salvatoris", e in altri testi apocrifi. E non è certo per una mera casualità che l'autore provenzale richiama il nome di quello stesso Vespasiano che è citato anche nella "Vindicta", malgrado questo imperatore non abbia affatto regnato nello stesso periodo in cui quel prefetto aveva amministrato la Giudea: stesse fonti, stessi errori storici.

È chiaro che, quando Antoine de la Sale riferisce i racconti a lui narrati dalla gente di quelle montagne, i Monti Sibillini, egli sta prestando ascolto a una delle molte varianti del racconto mitico riguardante Ponzio Pilato e il destino del suo esecrando cadavere. Il racconto è il medesimo, ma il luogo in cui esso è narrato - i Monti Sibillini - non è ricompreso tra i luoghi canonici di sepoltura elencati nelle ben note fonti della leggenda, inclusa la "Legenda Aurea".

In modo assai eloquente, in un significativo passaggio del "Paradiso della Regina Sibilla", Antoine de la Sale cita esattamente quella specifica motivazione che si trova alla base del racconto mitico riguardante Ponzio Pilato, così come lo conosciamo andando a leggere le fonti più antiche, risalenti ai primi secoli della Cristianità:

«Egli [l'imperatore] decise di metterlo a morte, perché Pilato non aveva desiderato condannare il nostro vero salvatore Gesù Cristo, ma comunque non aveva adempiuto al proprio dovere di proteggerlo dalla morte».

[Nel testo originale francese: «Il [l'empereur] le fist mourir suppose que pillate ne voullist oncques condampner nostredit vray sauveur Jhesuscrist mais pour ce quil ne fist son devoir a le garantir de mort»].

Questo è proprio il nucleo della mitica colpa ascritta a Ponzio Pilato, così come la leggiamo nella "Paradosis Pilati" («avresti dovuto proteggere Gesù dai giudei»), nel "Rescriptum Tiberii" («così come tu hai condannato ingiustamente quell'uomo e lo hai consegnato alla morte»), nelle parole scritte da Eusebio di Cesarea («Pilato, che fu ingiusto giudice del Salvatore») e Aurelio Ambrogio («nessun giudice è autorizzato a cedere all'odio o alla paura, vendendo così del sangue innocente [...] Egli non si ritrasse dal pronunciare una così empia sentenza»): il governatore romano aveva deciso di non difendere la vita di Gesù Cristo e, cedendo ai propri timori e alla propria codardia, lo aveva avviato alla Croce.

Ancora una volta, il racconto che troviamo vivere tra i Monti Sibillini, in Italia, all'inizio del quindicesimo secolo, appartiene chiaramente al medesimo corpus narrativo di tradizioni leggendarie che costituiscono l'antico mito concernente Ponzio Pilato, la sua colpa, la sua morte, i suoi luoghi di sepoltura.

E il racconto rinvenuto da Antoine de la Sale in questo remoto angolo d'Italia nell'anno 1420 contiene, anche, un ulteriore elemento fondamentale, che caratterizza l'intera leggenda relativa al prefetto romano.

Il lago, continua infatti de la Sale, «è attentamente sorvegliato [...] perché quando qualcuno vi perviene segretamente e vi pratica le arti del Demonio, subito si leva nella regione una tempesta così violenta da distruggere tutti i raccolti e i beni della contrada» (Fig. 2).

Questo non è nulla di meno che un chiarissimo riferimento a uno dei tratti centrali della tradizione leggendaria che riguarda il corpo maledetto di Pilato: i dèmoni, che suscitano paurosi sconvolgimenti attorno a quel cadavere.

Abbiamo infatti avuto occasione di vedere come sia il fiume Tevere che il fiume Rodano subissero violente agitazioni a causa della presenza del corpo del prefetto, mentre legioni di demoni provocavano tempeste, fulmini, tuoni e grandini. Inoltre, turbini e fiamme fuoriuscivano dal pozzo nelle Alpi nel quale quel cadavere era stato gettato, una collezione di «illusioni create dai demoni» («dyabolicae machinationes») generate dal Nemico, così come ci racconta la "Legenda Aurea". Dunque, possiamo con sicurezza affermare come il materiale leggendario riferito dalla gente del luogo al gentiluomo provenzale sia sostanzialmente simile a quello già da noi esaminato nel corso della nostra analisi relativa al mito di Pilato.

Ma è l'intera narrazione fissata su pergamena da Antoine de la Sale ad apparire totalmente immersa nella tradizione letteraria relativa a Pilato. È lo stesso autore provenzale a citare una serie di passaggi tratti da Paolo Orosio, incluso il notissimo brano che menziona il celebre e leggendario rapporto che sarebbe stato vergato da Pilato per l'imperatore Tiberio, a Roma, per molti secoli oggetto di spasmodica attenzione nel contesto della tradizione mitica concernente il prefetto romano:

«Come racconta Orosio al secondo capitolo del suo ottavo libro, nel quale egli dice che dopo la morte e la resurrezione di Gesù Cristo Pilato inviò al citato imperatore Tiberio le importanti e meravigliose notizie concernenti il processo, la morte e la resurrezione del predetto Gesù di Nazareth...».

[Nel testo originale francese: «Sicomme dit Orose ou second chappitre de son viii livre qui disioit que apres la mort et la resurrection de Jhesucrist pilate envoya au dit thibere cesar les treshaultes et merveilleuses nouvelles et le proces de la mort et resurrection du nomme Jhesus de Nazaret...»].

Quindi, con il "Paradiso della Regina Sibilla" di Antoine de la Sale, ci troviamo di fronte a una delle varianti di un racconto leggendario che ha compiuto un viaggio lungo due millenni. Un racconto che riguarda Ponzio Pilato, il suo ruolo chiave nella Passione di Gesù Cristo, la sua imperdonabile colpa e la sua punizione finale, che non sarebbe cessata nemmeno con la sua morte. Una variante del racconto che è stata ambientata, per qualche ragione, tra questi gelidi laghi celati tra le vette dei Monti Sibillini, in Italia (Fig. 3).

Eppure, prima di procedere oltre, è necessario affrontare il tema della presenza di un elemento addizionale e discordante.

Nel resoconto di Antoine de la Sale, appare ai nostri occhi un carro, trainato da due coppie di bufali. Sul carro, giace il corpo morto di Pilato, mentre egli viene trasportato verso il suo destino finale di eterna maledizione (Fig. 4).

Una lugubre, agghiacciante visione di morte. Una visione nella quale non ci siamo mai imbattuti in precedenza, in nessuna delle antiche fonti che costituiscono il leggendario racconto di Ponzio Pilato.

Cosa significa quel carro? Perché è lì? E perché è trainato da bufali? Cosa ha a che fare, tutto questo, con Pilato e con la sua tenebrosa leggenda?

Per la prima volta in assoluto, andremo a svelare il significato di questa strana, orribile immagine. Un'immagine nella quale la morte gioca un ruolo primario. Come andremo a vedere nel prossimo articolo.




















































25 Aug 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /21. Why is the Sibillini Mountain Range missing?
Our amazing journey into the legendary tale of the myth concerning Pontius Pilate and his death is almost reaching its conclusion. And now it is time to go back to our initial questions.

We know that in central Italy raises the Sibillini Mountain Range, a portion of the Apennines. We know that within that massive ridge stands Mount Vettore, a giant, arched mountain which dominates the region with its precipitous cliffs. We know that this titanic mountain contains a special, sinister place, a colossal glacial cirque, enshrouded in a silence of death. There, two small lakes filled with icy waters, known as the Lakes of Pilate, reflect the sky above (Fig. 1).

Antoine de la Sale, in his “The Paradise of Queen Sibyl”, reports that this is the burial place of Pontius Pilate, the fifth prefect of Roman-occupied Judaea (Fig. 2). The site is attended by necromancer who perform their ghastly arts. When this occurs, violent storms are stirred and the region gets ruined.

Are the lakes which are set in the middle of the Sibillini Mountain Range in Italy listed in Pilate's legendary tale as burial place for the Roman governor?

The answer is no.

Throughout the centuries, in the previous chapters we had the chance to clearly perceive the mythical route treaded by the dead, cursed body of Pilate in search of an impossible rest. And the Sibillini Mountain Range never pops up.

Let's summarize here the many findings we stumbled upon during our search.

From the Tiber to the Rhône. From Rome to Vienne. And then from Vienne to Lausanne. From two different rivers to a demonic pit in the Alps. This was the ghastly destiny of the cursed body of a dead man: a corpse who had belonged to a prefect of Judaea, who had lived in the time when Jesus Christ was nailed to a Cross for the salvation of the whole mankind.

This loathsome corpse has made a long journey through the centuries: the corpse of Pontius Pilate, the man who had sentenced the Son of God to death: despised by ancient writers like Flavius Josephus and Philo of Alexandria; depicted in the Gospels as an irresolute ruler; considered as a sort of prospect Christian by Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus; portrayed in the act of writing amazed reports about Jesus to his Emperor in Rome by Eusebius of Caesarea and Paulus Orosius; acquitted of all charges by Origen of Alexandria, Augustine of Hippo and subsequently Erasmus of Rotterdam, who rather preferred to condemn the Jews, Pontius Pilate's shadowy figure has been portrayed in turn as an intense witness to the Resurrection and a nasty slave to the Fiend.

In the apocryphal literature, such as the "Letter to Emperor Claudius", the "Gesta Pilati", contained in the "Gospel of Nicodemus", the "Anaphora Pilati”, the "Paradosis Pilati" and the “Letter to Tiberius” he manifestly provides an astonished testimony to the divine nature of Jesus Christ, and he is eventually enlisted within the ranks of the saints in the Ethiopian Orthodox Church: Pontius Pilate, a holy man.

On the other hand, a very different portrait of the Roman prefect has been handed down to us by the Western tradition. It was Celsus who first compared Pilate to Pentheus, the ancient king who put divine Dionysus in chains, and was horribly punished for that. Then Emperor Maximinus II had commissioned forged reports, to be ascribed to Pilate, with a view to discrediting Christians. Subsequently, Aurelius Ambrosius declared that the prefect was a malevolent judge subject to the power of darkness, and St. Gregory I the Great stated that he was a limb of the Devil's body. All this gave rise to the tradition, contained in apocryphal texts such as the "Vindicta Salvatoris", on his being recalled to Rome, summoned by Tiberius or even Vespasian, to meet the Emperor's rage. Punishments begin to follow, with Pilate being bricked up in a cave ("Epistola Tiberii ad Pilatum") and his fellow-culprit Caiaphas being rejected by the earth as his body is buried beneath the ground.

In the early Middle Ages, the gloominess of the legend deepens further: John of Antioch, the Byzantine "Suda", George Kedrenos describe the death sentence pronounced on Pilate by the Emperor of Rome, with the punishment ranging from sheer beheading to the antique «poena cullei», especially designed for parricides.

Then, on this legendary stage a town appears, and it is Vienne, in France, with its nearby river, the Rhône. The first to mention it in connection to Pontius Pilate is Ado of Vienne in the ninth century. But Vienne was already well known to all men of letters as the town in ancient Gaul to which the Emperor of Rome had banished Herod Archelaus, according to Flavius Josephus. Pilate and Archelaus had both ruled ancient Judaea, with a thirty-year interval between the two, so confusion sprang up, also in consideration of the major roles played by both Pilate and Herod Antipas, Archelaus' brother, in the Passion of Jesus Christ.

Vienne, France: a territory which is subsequently quoted by Otto of Freising and Petrus Comestor as well, with the addition of a plunge of the body into the Rhône and some weird commotion of the waters at the very spot where the burial occurred. Then we get to “De Vita Pilati”, with its comprehensive tale concerning Pilate's early life and a detailed account of his prosecution, death by suicide and burial into the Rhône, followed by an eerie commotion in the waters, the recovery of the corpse, and its removal to a hellish pit set amid the Alps.

Stephen of Bourbon, too, mentioned a demonic pit, this time set not too far from Vienne. But, then, it will be Jacobus de Varagine, with its "Legenda Aurea", who will consecrate the ultimate version of the tale about the final doom of Pontius Pilate's body: the Tiber, then the Rhône, and then some burial ground in Lausanne, and finally a pit in the Alps, and in all the listed places demons would grimly rejoice during their ghastly encounter with the cursed corpse.

Across this intricate, bimillennial tradition, can we retrieve any mention of the Sibillini Mountain Range?

The answer is, again, no.

They are never mentioned. Nobody ever says that the body of Pontius Pilate has found his burial place in a certain lake nested within that mountainous massif in Italy.

The Sibillini Mountain Range is not listed. The Italian peaks, magically named after a Sibyl, are totally missing (Fig. 3).

So what do they have to do with the legend of Pilate? Why did Antoine de la Sale include them in this gloomy, peculiar lore? Was the French gentleman wrong when he reported the tale of the lakes as connected to the myth of the Roman prefect (Fig. 4)? And who was the first to mention them as part of this ancient tradition?

Let's turn to the next chapter and try to find the answers to all the above questions.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /21. Perché i Monti Sibillini non sono mai menzionati?
Il nostro appassionante viaggio attraverso il racconto leggendario del mito che riguarda Ponzio Pilato e la sua sepoltura sta per giungere al termine. Ed è ora tempo di rivolgere il nostro sguardo indietro, verso le domande che ci eravamo posti inizialmente.

Sappiamo che nell'Italia centrale si levano i Monti Sibillini, una porzione degli Appennini. Sappiamo anche che, all'interno di questo imponente massiccio, si erge il Monte Vettore, una montagna titanica, dall'incredibile forma arcuata, che domina la regione con i suoi scoscesi e dirupati versanti. Sappiamo, infine, che questa grande montagna nasconde un luogo speciale, sinistro, un colossale circo glaciale, che giace in un silenzio di morte. Lì, due piccoli laghi ospitanti gelide acque, noti come i Laghi di Pilato, riflettono i colori del cielo che li sovrasta (Fig. 1).

Antoine de la Sale, nel suo "Paradiso della Regina Sibilla", riferisce come questo sito costituisca il luogo di sepoltura di Ponzio Pilato, il quinto prefetto della Giudea occupata dai romani (Fig. 2). Il sito è frequentato da maghi e negromanti, che qui si dedicano alle proprie arti esecrande. Quando ciò accade, violente tempeste vengono suscitate e l'intera regione ne viene devastata.

Ma questi laghi, posti al centro dei Monti Sibillini, in Italia, sono forse menzionati, nei racconti leggendari concernenti Pilato, come uno dei luoghi di sepoltura del governatore romano?

La risposta è no.

Attraversando i secoli, nei precedenti capitoli abbiamo avuto modo di discernere chiaramente il mitico viaggio percorso dal corpo maledetto di Pilato, in cerca di un impossibile riposo. E i Monti Sibillini non compaiono mai.

Proviamo allora a ricapitolare qui i numerosi fatti leggendari da noi rilevati nel corso della nostra ricerca.

Dal Tevere al Rodano. Da Roma a Vienne. E poi da Vienne a Losanna. Da due differenti fiumi fino a un demoniaco pozzo nascosto tra le Alpi. È stato questo l'agghiacciante destino dell'empio cadavere di un uomo deceduto: un corpo che era appartenuto a un prefetto della Giudea, che era vissuto nel tempo in cui Gesù Cristo era stato inchiodato alla Croce per la salvezza dell'intera umanità.

Quel cadavere infernale, il cadavere di Ponzio Pilato, l'uomo che aveva condannato a morte il Figlio di Dio, ha compiuto un lungo viaggio attraverso molti secoli: disprezzato, nel suo agire in qualità di prefetto, da autori classici quali Flavio Giuseppe e Filone d'Alessandria; dipinto nei Vangeli come un irresoluto governatore; considerato come una sorta di potenziale cristiano da Quinto Settimio Fiorente Tertulliano; ritratto da Eusebio di Cesarea e Paolo Orosio nell'atto di redigere meravigliati rapporti su Gesù indirizzati al proprio imperatore a Roma; assolto da ogni possibile colpa da Origene di Alessandria, Agostino d'Ippona e successivamente Erasmo da Rotterdam, che preferirono tutti accusare i giudei, la confusa figura di Ponzio Pilato è stata rappresentata alternativamente sia come un commosso testimone della Resurrezione, sia come un maligno servitore del Nemico.

Nella tradizione letteraria apocrifa, come la "Lettera all'imperatore Claudio", le "Gesta Pilati", contenute nel "Vangelo di Nicodemo", l'"Anaphora Pilati", la "Paradosis Pilati" e la "Lettera a Tiberio", egli rende una stupefatta testimonianza alla natura divina di Gesù Cristo, venendo così infine arruolato tra i ranghi dei santi celebrati dalla Chiesa Ortodossa Etiope: Ponzio Pilato, un sant'uomo.

Dall'altro lato, la tradizione occidentale ci ha tramandato un ritratto assai diverso del prefetto romano. Fu Celso a paragonare per primo Pilato a Penteo, l'antico re che aveva osato incatenare il divino Dioniso, andando così incontro a un'orribile punizione. In seguito, l'imperatore Massimino II aveva fatto predisporre falsi rapporti, da attribuirsi a Pilato, con l'obiettivo di screditare i cristiani. Era stato poi Aurelio Ambrogio a dichiarare che il prefetto era stato un maligno giudice soggetto al potere delle tenebre, e S. Gregorio Magno aveva affermato come egli fosse stato una delle membra del corpo del Demonio. Tutto questo aveva dato origine alla tradizione, contenuta in testi apocrifi quali la "Vindicta Salvatoris", a proposito del richiamo di Pilato a Roma, convocato da Tiberio o addirittura da Vespasiano, per affrontare la rabbia dell'imperatore. Cominciano così le punizioni, con Pilato murato vivo all'interno di una caverna ("Epistola Tiberii ad Pilatum") e il suo sodale, parimenti colpevole, Caifa che comincia a essere rifiutato dalla terra nella quale si tenta di seppellire il suo corpo.

Nell'Alto Medioevo, la leggenda diviene ancora più tenebrosa: Giovanni di Antiochia, la bizantina "Suda" e Giorgio Cedreno narrano di una sentenza di morte pronunciata nei confronti di Pilato dall'imperatore di Roma, con punizioni che variano dalla decapitazione all'antica «poena cullei», usualmente riservata ai parricidi.

Poi, una città appare sul palcoscenico, ed è Vienne, in Francia, con il suo fiume, il Rodano. Il primo a menzionarla in relazione a Ponzio Pilato è Adone di Vienne, nel nono secolo. Ma Vienne era già ben nota, a ogni studioso della letteratura classica, come la città dell'antica Gallia presso la quale l'imperatore di Roma aveva esiliato Erode Archelao, secondo quanto racconta Flavio Giuseppe. Pilato e Archelao avevano entrambi governato la Giudea, con un intervallo di circa trenta anni intercorrente tra i due, in modo tale da dare origine a una certa confusione, anche in considerazione dei ruoli primari interpretati da Pilato e Erode Antipa, fratello di Archelao, nelle vicende della Passione di Gesù Cristo.

Vienne, in Francia: un territorio che è successivamente menzionato anche da Ottone di Frisinga e Pietro Comestore, con l'aggiunta di un tuffo di quel corpo nel Rodano e alcune strane turbolenze delle acque nel punto esatto nel quale la sepoltura aveva avuto luogo. Arriviamo poi alla "De Vita Pilati", con il suo circostanziato racconto a proposito della vita del giovane Pilato e una dettagliata narrazione relativa alla sua condanna, alla morte per suicidio e al seppellimento nel Rodano, seguito dall'agitazione dei flutti, dal recupero del corpo e dal suo trasferimento all'interno di un demoniaco pozzo tra le Alpi.

Anche Stefano di Borbone aveva menzionato un diabolico abisso, stavolta situato non troppo distante da Vienne. Ma, infine, sarà Jacopo da Varagine, con la sua "Legenda Aurea", a stabilire la versione definitiva del racconto concernente il destino finale del cadavere di Ponzio Pilato: il Tevere, poi il Rodano, e in seguito un certo luogo di sepoltura a Losanna, e finalmente l'abisso nelle Alpi, e in ognuno di questi luoghi i demoni avrebbero lugubremente gioito in occasione del loro agghiacciante incontro con quel corpo maledetto.

Nel percorrere tutta questa complessa, bimillenaria tradizione, abbiamo potuto reperire alcuna menzione a proposito dei Monti Sibillini?

La risposta è, di nuovo, negativa.

Quelle montagne non sono mai nominate. Nessuno mai riferisce che il corpo di Ponzio Pilato avrebbe trovato il proprio luogo di sepoltura all'interno di un lago annidato tra le vette di quel massiccio montuoso in Italia.

I Monti Sibillini non sono inclusi nell'elenco. I picchi italiani, il cui nome è magicamente legato alla Sibilla, risultano essere totalmente assenti (Fig. 3).

E allora, cosa hanno essi a che fare con la leggenda di Pilato? Perché Antoine de la Sale li ha inclusi in questa peculiare, sinistra tradizione leggendaria? Il gentiluomo francese si stava forse sbagliando nel riferire il racconto di quei laghi, in connessione con il mito del prefetto romano (Fig. 4)? E chi è stato il primo a menzionarli come parte di quell'antica tradizione?

Proviamo a rivolgerci al prossimo articolo, per tentare di dare una risposta a tutte queste domande.


























































22 Aug 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /20. The “Legenda Aurea” and an ultimate resting place
More than one thousand ancient manuscripts surviving from the Middle Ages (Fig. 1). An impressive diffusion across all European countries and regions. A popular work, used by preachers to develop their sermons, read in churches and known by people belonging to all social classes. An encyclopedic accumulation of fascinating stories, which were intended for the moral and spiritual edification of the devotees, but also capable of entertain and amaze with the wondrous character of the tales included in this pious collection.

We are referring to the “Legenda Aurea”, the “Golden Legend”, or, with a more accurate translation, “Golden stories that must be read”, a masterpiece of medieval culture written by Jacobus de Varagine, a Dominican friar and bishop from the Italian town of Genoa, who lived between 1228 and 1298.

His collection of tales about the life and death of more than a hundred fifty saints, also including a number of chapters dedicated to all principal Christian festivities, soon became a landmark for the preaching activities of hiw own Dominicans, whose exact name was 'Order of the Preachers', out of the fluent, simple Latin used by Jacobus and the extraordinary effort to rework different hagiographic traditions, with a final, fully consistent merging which resulted into a highly readable, if not enjoyable, text full of tales concerning the most renowned saints, their miracolous deeds and their heroic martyrdoms as witnesses to the true faith.

The narrative set down by Jacobus was intended to convey a vision of martyred saints as hallowed men and women who establish a triumphant link between the living men and the Divine, through the sacrifice of their own lives for the glorification of God (Fig. 2). And, with this aim in mind, he did not forget to include legendary passages taken from apocryphal material: excerpts which are full of a sense of wonder that well suits the character of the whole work, open to larger audiences and dedicated to multiple sorts of readers.

Amid the huge amount of stories contained in the “Legenda Aurea”, at the chapter devoted to «De passione domini nostri Iesu Christi» («The Passion of our Lord Jesus Christ»), we find the story of the burial place of Pontius Pilate (Fig. 3).

We are in the late second half of the thirteenth century, and this is the very point in time when the legend of Pilate and his resting place is boosted to a European-wide fame, running fast through the nations owing to the most successful distribution of the “Legenda Aurea” across the centuries of the late Middle Ages.

From now on, everybody would know the story of Pontius Pilate and his troubled, demonic resting place.

And which fiendish resting place will the “Legenda Aurea” choose to mention? Will Jacobus de Varagine report the old, illustrious tale of Vienne and the river Rhône? Will the “Legenda” name any mountains in the Alps, following a more recent tradition we already saw in previous articles? Or, maybe, will it provide a first, never-heard-before reference to the Lakes of Pilatus, in the Sibillini Mountain Range?

Let's open the vellum pages of manuscript NAL 1747 preserved at the Département des Manuscrits of the Bibliothèque Nationale de France. Dating back to the thirteenth century, it is one of the most ancient manuscripts bearing the text of the “Legenda Aurea”.

And there, at Folium 92r, after a long introductory sermon on the Passion, Jacobus de Varagine enumerates the names of those who delivered Jesus Christ to a harrowing death: Judas, the Jews, and, of course, Pilate. Then Jacobus writes the following words (Fig. 4):

«About the punishment and origin of Judas, the narrative can be retrieved in the tale of St. Matthew; about the punishment and slaughter of the Jews you can read in the tale of St. James the Less; furthermore, about the punishment and origin of Pilate it is possible to read the account in some apocryphal narrative».

[In the original Latin text: «De poena et origine Judae invenies in legenda sancti Matthiae, de poena et excidio Judaeorum in legenda sancti Jacobi minoris, de poena autem et origine Pilati in quadam historia licet apocrypha legitur»].

The apocryphal narrative referred to by the “Legenda Aurea” is “De Vita Pilati”, the ancient poem dating to more than a century earlier, which we illustrated in a previous article. Jacobus de Varagine draws a large quantity of material from that apocryphal tale, starting his account from the birth of Pilate (with some changes with respect to “De Vita Pilati”) and then continuing with the early murder perpetrated by the young prefect-to-be against his half-brother, both being the sons of a same king in this version of the story. Exactly like in “De Vita Pilati”, Pilate is exiled to Rome as a hostage, and there he proceeds to kill the son of a king of the Francs, a hostage like himself. Again, he is sent to the uncivilized island of Pontus as a punishment, where he subjugates the local population and gains for himself the epithet of Pontius.

Up to now, this is precisely the same account already told by “De Vita Pilati”. And the “Legenda Aurea” runs on the very same track, with Pontius Pilate now called to Judaea by Herod, they being initially friends and then competitors for the power in the region. When Jesus is crucified, Pilate begins to fear that his own deeds would be considered as an «offense to Tiberius Caesar, as he had sentenced innocent blood to death» (in the original Latin text: «[...] offensam Tyberii Caesarii eo quod condemnasset sanguinem innocentem»).

Again, like in “De Vita Pilati” (but there the Emperor was Titus), Tiberius is afflicted by a serious illness («morbo gravi teneretur»). The news of the miracles carried out by Jesus Christ arrive in the capital city of the Empire, and Tiberius commands to have that amazing Jew brought to Rome, in the hope of a cure for his disease. When in Jerusalem, his delegate is informed by a woman, St. Veronica (she is openly named in the “Legenda Aurea”), that Jesus was condemned and crucified by order of Pontius Pilate himself. So Pilate is taken and brought to Rome, where he is forced to face the Emperor's rage, though abated by a miracolous soothing effect created on Tiberius by Jesus' tunic, which Pilate had brought with him from Jerusalem and was wearing before the Emperor (another legendary tale integrated by Jacobus in his own account).

Yet the above wondrous event will not save Pilate's life, and Tiberius will pronounce fatal words against him:

«Thus a sentence was issued upon Pilate, that he shall die of a ghastly death».

[In the original Latin text: «Data est igitur in Pilatum sententia, ut morte turpissima damnaretur»].

However, as depicted in “De Vita Pilati”, the former prefect of Judaea anticipates his own death sentence: «hearing of his doom, he killed himself with his own knife, ending up his life by this sort of death» (in the original Latin text: «audiens hoc Pylatus cultello proprio se necavit et tali morte vitam finivit») (Fig. 5).

And now, a most astounding section of the tale begins.

Because Jacobus de Varagine, as in his own habit, contrives a brilliant merger of the many legendary traditions concerning the corpse of Pontius Pilate and his successive resting places. And, in this multifaceted form, he will consign that gloomy myth to history.

First, we find something unexpected. Owing to the fact that Pilate's suicide occurs in Rome, his body too finds its initial burial site into a most renowned river which flows through the city, the Tiber:

«After having tied his dead body to a heavy weight, it was thrown into the river Tiber».

[In the original Latin text: «Moli igitur ingenti alligatur et in Tyberim flumen immergitur»].

Yet that corpse was too unholy to simply rest in peace; and the result was no different from what earlier legends used to tell about the blood-curdling turmoils that affected the Rhône (Fig. 6):

«But abominable, fiendish demons, rejoicing of that fiendish, abominable corpse, began to stir amazing waves, carrying it off now in the water and now in the air, and aroused lightnings, storms, thunders and hail up in the air so appallingly, that everybody was seized by a ghastly dread».

[In the original Latin text: «Spiritus vero maligni et sordidi corpori maligno et sordido congaudentes et nunc in aquis nunc in aere rapientes mirabiles indundationes in aquis movebant et fulgura, tempestates, tonitrua et grandines in aere terribiliter generabant, ita ut cuncti timore horribili tenerentur»].

This horrifying description of the interaction between the corpse of Pilate, a limb of the Fiend in St. Gregory's writings, and the waters inhabited by demonic shadows is a vision that will mark the legendary tale of the Roman prefect for the centuries to come.

However, Jacobus' tale is not over. This is only the first step of a ghastly journey of that corpse. A second step follows at once, and this is a step we already know well (Fig. 7):

«Owing to these events, the Romans drew him out from the river Tiber and, as an outrage, fetched the corpse to Vienne and cast it into the Rhône. In fact 'Vienne' was intended as a sort of 'Gehenna', a place of damnation; or, better, 'Bienne' was the name given to the town because it had been built in two years».

[In the original Latin text: «Quapropter Romani eum a Tyberis fluvio extrahentes derisionis causa ipsum Viennam deportaverunt et Rhodano fluvio immerserunt. Vienna enim dicitur quasi via Gehennae, quia erat tunc locus maledictionis, vel potius dicitur Bienna eo quod, ut dicitur, biennio sit constructa»].

The body of Pontius Pilate has now reached Vienne, France, which had been its legendary burial place since the ninth century, when bishop Ado of Vienne, in his “Chronicles of the Six Ages of the World”, had indicated that town as the deportation site of Herod and Pilate, both exiled from Galilee and Judaea to the Roman province of Gaul. Vienne: the town that, since the first century, was indicated by Flavius Josephus as the exile place of Herod Archelaus. And Jacobus de Varagine sticks to this ancient tradition, even though he indulges in presenting his reader with a couple of surmises on the role of Vienne in this tale, without succeeding in being plausible and persuading.

At any rate, the “Legenda Aurea” has more to say on it. As we already know, Pilate is not a quiet figure even when dead (Fig. 8):

«But the evil spirits did not desert this place, just like it had occurred in Rome: they acted the same way, so the people there, unable to bear such a haunting plague of demons, removed that curse far from themselves and consigned it to a burial place in the territory of the town of Lausanne».

[In the original Latin text: «Sed ibi nequam spiritus effluunt, ibidem eadem operantes, homines ergo illi tantam infestationem daemonum non ferentes vas illud maledictionis a se removerunt et illud sepeliendum Lausanae civitatis territorio commiserunt»].

Here we are: we have just got to the Alps, the mountains that were first indicated as Pilate's burial place in “De Vita Pilati”. And we finally arrived in Switzerland, by Lausanne, the town which was also mentioned in a thirteenth-century anonymous commentary to the “Speculum regum”, written a century earlier by Godfrey of Viterbo, as we already illustrated at the very beginning of our long travel into this legendary tale.

Have we finished? Not in the least.

Let's continue our read from the “Legenda Aurea”'s chapter on the Passion, because a fourth and final resting place is about to appear (Fig. 9):

«However those who were overwhelmed by that same plague as described before, resolved to remove it from themselves, so they hurled the body into a certain pit set amid the mountains, from which people say that deceptive illusions created by the demons are visible in their agitation still today».

[In the original Latin text: «Qui cum nimis praefatis infestationibus gravarentur, ipsam a se removerunt et in quodam puteo montibus circumsepto immerserunt, ubi adhuc relatione quorundam quaedam dyabolicae machinationes ebullire videntur»].

At last, we have concluded our ghastly journey together with Pontius Pilate's cursed corpse: we started from the Tiber in Rome; then we moved to the Rhône, France; subsequently we landed near Lausanne, Switzerland; and we ended our travel into a pit hidden amid the Swiss Alps. That is, the same place we also found in “De Vita Pilati” (a «place amid the Alps» which used to erupt «direful flames», full of rejoicing demons) and in the commentary to the “Speculum regum” (from which «storms and hail and lightnings and thunders» raised).

«This account», concludes Jacobus de Varagine in his “Legenda Aurea”, «can be read in the said apocryphal history» («Hucusque in praedicta historia apocrypha leguntur»).

And this is the account that the “Legenda Aurea” will spread across Europe from the thirteenth century onwards. Audiences of all kinds, from devotees in churches to aristocrats in their castles, will be reading those words, dreaming of the horrifying doom that Pontius Pilates, once a Roman prefect, experienced after his own death.

Here we arrived. But is there any space, in this story, for the Sibillini Mountain Range and its Lakes of Pilatus?

No. There is no space. They are never mentioned. Rome is in there, and Vienne, and Lausanne, and also Lucerne. But the Sibillini Mountain Range are never present.

In all the ancient sources we perused, up to the “Legenda Aurea”, there is not the slightest trace of this portion of the Apennines, set in the middle of Italy.

So where do we go from here?

Let's proceed into the next chapter, and we will try to find a direction.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /20. La "Legenda Aurea" e un luogo di sepoltura definitivo
Più di mille manoscritti pervenuti fino ai nostri giorni dal Medioevo (Fig. 1). Una straordinaria diffusione attraverso tutte le nazioni e le regioni d'Europa. Un'opera popolare, utilizzata dai predicatori per sviluppare i propri sermoni, letta nelle chiese e conosciuta da uomini e donne appartenenti a ogni classe sociale. Una raccolta enciclopedica di affascinanti narrazioni, concepite per l'edificazione morale e spirituale dei fedeli, ma anche capace di intrattenere e conquistare ogni genere di pubblico grazie al carattere meraviglioso dei racconti che facevano parte di questa devota collezione.

Stiamo parlando della "Legenda Aurea", la "Leggenda d'Oro", o meglio, con una traduzione maggiormente accurata, "Le auree storie che devono essere lette", un capolavoro della cultura medievale redatto da Jacopo da Varagine, un frate domenicano che fu vescovo della città di Genova, vissuto tra il 1228 e il 1298.

La sua raccolta di racconti concernenti la vita e la morte di più di centocinquanta santi, comprendente anche una serie di capitoli dedicati alle principali ricorrenze cristiane, divenne presto una pietra miliare per le attività di predicazione condotte dai suoi stessi confratelli dominicani, la cui esatta denominazione era 'Ordine dei Predicatori', grazie alla lingua latina semplice ma fluente utilizzata da Jacopo e allo straordinario impegno di sistematizzazione di differenti tradizioni agiografiche, confluito in una fusione conclusiva caratterizzata da una grande coerenza interna, e risultante in un testo non solo di grande leggibilità, ma anche assai godibile, pieno di racconti relativi ai santi più famosi, ai miracoli da essi compiuti e al loro eroico martirio in qualità di testimoni della vera fede.

La narrazione posta su pergamena da Jacopo intendeva rappresentare i santi martiri come uomini e donne da venerare in quanto costruttori di un trionfante vincolo tra i viventi e il divino, tramite il sacrificio delle proprie vite a maggior gloria di Dio (Fig. 2). E, in questo contesto, egli non disdegnò di inserire vari passaggi leggendari tratti dalle fonti apocrife: brani pervasi da un senso del meraviglioso che ben si adatta al carattere dell'intera opera, destinata a un pubblico assai vasto e dedicata a lettori di ogni genere ed estrazione sociale.

Tra le moltissime storie contenute nella "Legenda Aurea", nel capitolo intitolato «De passione domini nostri Iesu Christi» («La Passione di Nostro Signore Gesù Cristo»), troviamo il racconto riguardante la sepoltura di Ponzio Pilato (Fig. 3).

Ci troviamo nella seconda metà del tredicesimo secolo, ed è proprio questo il momento nel tempo in cui la leggenda che narra di Pilato e del luogo in cui egli giacerebbe conobbe una grande diffusione in tutta Europa, correndo veloce tra le nazioni grazie alla fortunatissima diffusione della "Legenda Aurea" attraverso i secoli del tardo Medioevo.

Da questo momento in poi, chiunque sarebbe stato a conoscenza delle vicende legate a Ponzio Pilato e al suo agitato, demoniaco luogo di sepoltura.

E quale infernale sepoltura avrebbe scelto di citare, l'autore della "Legenda Aurea"? Avrebbe forse menzionato l'antico, illustre racconto ambientato a Vienne e presso il fiume Rodano? Oppure, avrebbe fatto riferimento a un qualche picco delle Alpi, seguendo una tradizione più recente, che abbiamo già avuto modo di illustrare in precedenti articoli? O, forse, avrebbe finalmente fornito, per la prima volta nella storia, un inedito riferimento, mai udito prima, ai Laghi di Pilato, posti tra i Monti Sibillini, in Italia?

Andiamo ad aprire le pagine di pergamena del manoscritto NAL 1747, conservato presso il Département des Manuscrits della Bibliothèque Nationale de France. Databile al tredicesimo secolo, si tratta di uno dei più antichi manoscritti contenenti il testo della "Legenda Aurea".

E lì, al foglio 92r, dopo un lungo sermone introduttivo sulla Passione, Jacopo da Varagine elenca i nomi di coloro che consegnarono Gesù Cristo a una morte atroce: Giuda, i giudei, e, naturalmente, Pilato. Poi, Jacopo scrive le seguenti parole (Fig. 4):

«Sulla pena e sull'origine di Giuda, la narrazione può essere reperita nel racconto che riguarda S. Matteo; a proposito della punizione e del massacro dei giudei è possibile leggerne nel racconto di S. Giacomo il Minore; inoltre, della pena e dell'origine di Pilato si legge in una certa narrazione apocrifa».

[Nel testo originale latino: «De poena et origine Judae invenies in legenda sancti Matthiae, de poena et excidio Judaeorum in legenda sancti Jacobi minoris, de poena autem et origine Pilati in quadam historia licet apocrypha legitur»].

La narrazione apocrifa alla quale si riferisce la "Legenda Aurea" è la "De Vita Pilati", l'antico poema risalente a più di un secolo prima, da noi illustrato nel nostro precedente articolo. Giacomo da Varagine trae una significativa quantità di materiale da questo racconto apocrifo, iniziando la propria narrazione con la nascita di Pilato (con alcuni cambiamenti rispetto alla "De Vita Pilati") e poi proseguendo con il precoce omicidio perpetrato dal giovane futuro prefetto contro il proprio fratellastro, in questa versione della storia figlio di uno stesso re. Proprio come in "De Vita Pilati", Pilato è in seguito esiliato a Roma in qualità di ostaggio, per poi commettere l'omicidio del figlio di un re dei Franchi, anch'egli ostaggio presso i romani. Anche in questo racconto Pilato viene spedito, a titolo di punizione, presso la barbara isola del Ponto, dove egli riesce a sottomettere la riottosa popolazione locale guadagnando così per se stesso l'epiteto di Ponzio.

Fino a questo punto, questo non è altro che il medesimo racconto già narratoci dalla "De Vita Pilati". E la "Legenda Aurea" percorre esattamente lo stesso binario, con Ponzio Pilato invitato in Giudea da Erode, con il quale si troverà inizialmente in termini di amicizia, per poi successivamente arrivare a contenderne il potere in quella regione. Quando ha luogo la Crocifissione di Gesù, Pilato comincia a temere che il suo comportamento possa essere considerato come un'«offesa nei confronti di Tiberio Cesare, avendo egli condannato a morte del sangue innocente» (nel testo originale latino: «[...] offensam Tyberii Caesarii eo quod condemnasset sanguinem innocentem»).

Di nuovo, come in "De Vita Pilati" (ma lì l'imperatore era Tito), Tiberio è afflitto da una grave malattia («morbo gravi teneretur»). Le notizie a proposito dei miracoli compiuti da Gesù Cristo giungono fino alla capitale dell'Impero, e Tiberio ordina che quello straordinario giudeo sia portato a Roma, nella speranza di potere ottenere una cura per la sua malattia. Una volta arrivato a Gerusalemme, il suo delegato viene informato da una donna, S. Veronica (apertamente citata nella "Legenda Aurea"), che Gesù è già stato condannato e crocifisso per ordine dello stesso Ponzio Pilato. Pilato viene allora catturato e trasferito a Roma, dove egli si trova infine ad affrontare la rabbia dell'imperatore, benché parzialmente ridimensionata dal miracoloso effetto curativo indotto su Tiberio dalla tunica di Gesù, che Pilato ha portato con sé da Gerusalemme e che indossa durante l'udienza con l'imperatore (un altro racconto leggendario integrato da Jacopo da Varagine nella propria narrazione).

Ma questo evento così straordinario non salverà certamente la vita di Pilato, e Tiberio pronuncerà parole fatali contro di lui:

«Pertanto fu resa sentenza contro Pilato, che dovesse morire di una morte orribile».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Data est igitur in Pilatum sententia, ut morte turpissima damnaretur»].

Malgrado ciò, come già descritto nella "De Vita Pilati", l'ex-prefetto della Giudea anticiperà quella sentenza di morte a lui stesso destinata: «udendo ciò, Pilato si uccise con il suo stesso pugnale, ponendo così termine alla propria vita» (nel testo originale latino: «audiens hoc Pylatus cultello proprio se necavit et tali morte vitam finivit») (Fig. 5).

Ed è qui che ha inizio una nuova, affascinante sezione del racconto.

Perché Jacopo da Varagine, seguendo il proprio usuale metodo narrativo, architetta una brillante fusione tra le varie tradizioni leggendarie che riguardano il corpo di Ponzio Pilato e i suoi successivi luoghi di sepoltura. E, proprio in questa multiforme versione, egli consegnerà questo macabro mito ai secoli che verranno.

In primo luogo, ci imbattiamo subito in qualcosa di inaspettato. Poiché il suicidio di Pilato ha luogo in Roma, anche il corpo del prefetto trova il suo primo luogo di sepoltura proprio nel famosissimo fiume romano, il Tevere:

«Il suo corpo fu legato a un grosso peso, e poi fu gettato nel Tevere».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Moli igitur ingenti alligatur et in Tyberim flumen immergitur»].

Ma quel cadavere era troppo esecrabile per potere riposare in pace; e il risultato non fu differente da quello che le precedenti tradizioni leggendarie sono state solite narrarci a proposito delle terrificanti turbolenze che avevano agitato il fiume Rodano (Fig. 6):

«Ma spiriti maligni ed esecrandi, gioendo di quel cadavere maligno ed esecrando, cominciarono a suscitare straordinarie ondate, trasportandolo ora in acqua, ora nell'aria, e generando nell'aria fulmini, tempeste, tuoni e grandini in modo così terrificante, che tutti furono presi da terribile paura».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Spiritus vero maligni et sordidi corpori maligno et sordido congaudentes et nunc in aquis nunc in aere rapientes mirabiles indundationes in aquis movebant et fulgura, tempestates, tonitrua et grandines in aere terribiliter generabant, ita ut cuncti timore horribili tenerentur»].

Questa agghiacciante descrizione, che ci presenta l'interazione tra il corpo di Pilato, una delle membra del demonio secondo quanto affermato da Papa S. Gregorio Magno, e le acque abitate da ombre demoniache costituisce una descrizione che segnerà in modo indelebile la leggenda del prefetto romano per i secoli a venire.

Ma il racconto di Jacopo non è affatto terminato. Questo, infatti, non è che il primo passo di un abominevole viaggio, compiuto da quel corpo. Un secondo passo segue immediatamente, e si tratta di una tappa che ormai conosciamo molto bene (Fig. 7):

«A causa di questi eventi, i romani trassero quel cadavere dal fiume Tevere e, per maggior oltraggio, lo trasportarono a Vienne e lo gettarono nel fiume Rodano. Vienne, infatti, voleva quasi significare 'Gehenna', che era un luogo di perdizione; o anche 'Bienna', in quanto quella città era stata costruita nel volgere di due anni».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Quapropter Romani eum a Tyberis fluvio extrahentes derisionis causa ipsum Viennam deportaverunt et Rhodano fluvio immerserunt. Vienna enim dicitur quasi via Gehennae, quia erat tunc locus maledictionis, vel potius dicitur Bienna eo quod, ut dicitur, biennio sit constructa»].

Il corpo di Ponzio Pilato ha dunque raggiunto la città di Vienne, in Francia, che era stata considerata come il suo leggendario luogo di sepoltura sin dal nono secolo, quando il vescovo Adone di Vienne, nelle sue "Cronache delle sei età del mondo", aveva indicato proprio quella città come il sito di deportazione di Erode e Pilato, entrambi inviati in esilio dalla Galilea e dalla Giudea verso la provincia romana della Gallia. Vienne: la città che, già a partire dal primo secolo, era stata indicata da Flavio Giuseppe come il luogo di esilio di Erode Archelao. E Jacopo da Varagine aderisce a questa antica tradizione, benché egli appaia sentirsi in obbligo di presentare ai propri lettori un paio di ipotesi in merito al ruolo di Vienne in questo racconto, senza però riuscire a risultare plausibile e convincente.

In ogni caso, la "Legenda Aurea" ha ancora qualcosa da aggiungere all'intera questione. Come già sappiamo, Pilato non è certo un personaggio tranquillo, nemmeno da morto (Fig. 8):

«Ma gli spiriti malvagi non disertarono nemmeno questo luogo, presso il quale essi operarono proprio come a Roma: e così quegli uomini, non potendo sopportare una tale infestazione di demoni, allontanarono da sé questa maledizione e la consegnarono affinché fosse seppellita nel territorio della città di Losanna».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Sed ibi nequam spiritus effluunt, ibidem eadem operantes, homines ergo illi tantam infestationem daemonum non ferentes vas illud maledictionis a se removerunt et illud sepeliendum Lausanae civitatis territorio commiserunt»].

Ed eccoci arrivati: siamo infine giunti presso le Alpi, le montagne che furono indicate come il luogo di sepoltura di Pilato, per la prima volta, nella "De Vita Pilati". E siamo dunque giunti in Svizzera, a Losanna, la città che era stata menzionata in un commento anonimo, risalente al tredicesimo secolo, allo "Speculum regum", l'opera scritta un secolo prima da Goffredo da Viterbo, già da noi citata all'inizio del nostro lungo viaggio attraverso questo leggendario racconto.

È forse questa la fine? Niente affatto.

Proseguiamo con la nostra lettura del capitolo sulla Passione tratto dalla “Legenda Aurea”, perché sta per entrare in scena un quarto - e questa volta definitivo - luogo di sepoltura (Fig. 9):

«Ma coloro che subirono la medesima infestazione già in precedenza descritta, decisero di allontanarla da sé, e così gettarono quel corpo in un certo abisso circondato dalle montagne, presso il quale ancora oggi, secondo quanto riferito da alcuni, è possibile osservare il ribollente manifestarsi di illusioni create dai demoni».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Qui cum nimis praefatis infestationibus gravarentur, ipsam a se removerunt et in quodam puteo montibus circumsepto immerserunt, ubi adhuc relatione quorundam quaedam dyabolicae machinationes ebullire videntur»].

Alla fine, abbiamo così concluso il nostro agghiacciante viaggio assieme al cadavere maledetto di Ponzio Pilato: siamo partiti dal fiume Tevere, a Roma; ci siamo poi trasferiti presso il Rodano, in Francia; successivamente, siamo atterrati non lontano da Losanna, in Svizzera; e abbiamo terminato il nostro cammino all'interno di un abisso, nascosto tra le Alpi Svizzere. Esattamente lo stesso luogo già menzionato nella "De Vita Pilati" («un luogo tra le Alpi», che era solito emettere «terrificanti fiamme», suscitate dai demoni esultanti), nonché nel commento allo "Speculum regum" (in cui quel luogo era fonte di «tempeste, grandini, folgori e tuoni»).

«Questa storia», conclude Jacopo da Varagine nella sua "Legenda Aurea", «può essere letto nel citato racconto apocrifo» («Hucusque in praedicta historia apocrypha leguntur»).

È questo, dunque, il racconto che la "Legenda Aurea" diffonderà in tutta Europa dal tredicesimo secolo in poi. Un pubblico estremamente numeroso e variegato, dai fedeli nelle chiese ai nobili nei loro castelli, potrà leggere queste parole, alimentando i sogni e le leggende sull'orribile destino che Ponzio Pilato, un tempo illustre prefetto romano, aveva conosciuto dopo la propria morte.

E siamo arrivati sin qui. Ma c'è alcuno spazio, in questa storia, per i Monti Sibillini e i Laghi di Pilato che in essi giacciono?

No. Non c'è spazio alcuno. Essi non sono mai menzionati. Abbiamo Roma, e Vienne, e Losanna, e anche Lucerna. Ma i Monti Sibillini non sono presenti.

In tutte le fonti antiche da noi visitate, fino ad arrivare alla "Legenda Aurea", non vi è traccia alcuna di questa porzione degli Appennini, posti al centro dell'Italia.

E dunque, verso quale direzione possiamo pensare di muoverci ora?

Proseguiamo con il prossimo capitolo, e proviamo a individuare una possibile direzione.






















































































br />



































4 Jul 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /19. Rivers, pits and mountains (but none in Italy)
Pontius Pilate, a cursed corpse. Since the early-Christian age a tradition, mainly propagating itself in the western territories of Europe, had identified the fifth prefect of Judaea as a «diaboli membrum», a limb of the body of the Fiend, according to the horrific words pronounced by Pope St. Gregory the Great in his homilies.

So, the circumstances of his death and the fate of his dead body began to be the subject of a number of oral tales, which here and then consolidated into written passages, remarks and full pieces of narratives, each one adding, one way or the other, to the fantastic picture of a doomed Pilate, deprived of any rest even though he had already passed away, as a result of a suicidal act or a harrowing death inflicted by the Emperor of Rome as a punishment for the prefect's role in the crucifiction of Jesus Christ (Fig. 1).

In the early Middle Ages, the tales began to point to a specific burial place for Pilate: the river Rhône, by the town of Vienne, France, a settlement already openly mentioned by ancient author Flavius Josephus as a banishment place for Herod Archelaus, while his brother Herod Antipas was portrayed as having been exiled to nearby Lyon.

At that very point in the river, the waters were shaken by demonic turmoils, which put all sailing ships at risk. In addition to that, twelfth-century “De Vita Pilati” added a further piece of information: the cursed body was recovered from the eddying waters and brought to a specific location set amid the Alps, the most elevated mountains in Europe; there, he was cast into a hellish pits, where flames and demons welcomed it.

Where was this burning pit situated, amid the Alps? Do we have any medieval account which tells us the location of the ultimate resting place of Pontius Pilate?

As we already mentioned at the beginning of this series of articles, in the first half of the thirteenth century a Dominican preacher, Stephen of Bourbon, wrote in his “Tractatus de diversis materiis predicabilibus” the following information on Pontius Pilate, Vienne, and some mountain lying nearby, partly drawing his words from Jean de Mailly's “Abbreviatio in gestis et miraculis sanctorum”:

«Others say that in Lyon he [Pontius Pilate] was condemned to be hanged, and he was actually hanged at Vienne [...] And not far from that same place, on a mount near St. Chamon, he [Pilate] was hurled into a pit; from this pit, when a stone was thrown in it, they say vapours are issued, and storms arouse».

[In the original Latin text: «Alii dicunt quod Lugduni suspendio adjudicatus et apud Viennam est suspensus [...] et ibi prope in monte supra Saint Chamon in puteo projectus; ubi, quando lapis proicitur, fumus inde egredi dicitur, de quo tempestas concitatur»].

Stephen of Bourbon was born in the French town of Belleville, by the river Rhône, and only a few miles from Lyon. According to his writing, the mysterious mountain with the hellish pit which would contain the body of Pilate is located near Saint-Chamond, again in the territory of Lyon. And there, the adjacent relief, still today, is called the 'Massif de Pilat', the mountain range of Pilate, whose main peak is the 'Mont de Pilat'.

Thus, the demonic burial place of the prefect of Judaea seems to wander around Lyon, first in the Rhône, and then on a nearby mountain, in a pit which emits smoke and arouses storms. On the other hand, “De Vita Pilati” indicates the Alps as Pilate's resting place, with ancillary flames and demons included (Fig. 2).

One major piece of information must be noted: no medieval account on Pontius Pilate points, in any way, to the area of the Sibillini Mountain Range, in Italy.

So what's next? Have we finished with Pilate's roaming across the rivers and mountains of Europe? Not in the least. Because the next step will bring our search into another medieval text, a best seller of its age: the “Legenda Aurea”

And we will stumble upon further astounding findings.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /19. Fiumi, cavità e montagne (ma nulla in Italia)
Ponzio Pilato, un corpo maledetto. Sin dai primi secoli della Cristianità, una tradizione, diffusa principalmente nei territori occidentali dell'Europa, ha inteso identificare il quinto prefetto della Giudea come un «diaboli membrum», una porzione del corpo del Nemico, come rappresentato nelle terrificanti parole pronunciate da Papa Gregorio Magno nelle proprie omelie.

E così, le circostanze della morte di Pilato e il destino del suo cadavere cominciarono a essere oggetto di numerose narrazioni orali, che si andarono condensando, in varie occasioni, in passaggi vergati per iscritto, chiose e veri e propri brani letterari, ognuno dei quali andava ad aggiungere specifici elementi al fantastico affresco di un Pilato ormai maledetto, privato del riposo eterno seppure già consegnato alla morte, in conseguenza di un suicidio o di una atroce punizione a lui inflitta dall'imperatore di Roma a causa del ruolo rivestito da quel governatore nella crocifissione di Gesù Cristo (Fig. 1).

Nel primo medioevo, i racconti cominciarono a puntare verso uno specifico luogo, presso il quale Pilato sarebbe stato sepolto: il fiume Rodano, nel tratto adiacente alla città di Vienne, in Francia, un insediamento già esplicitamente menzionato in antico da Flavio Giuseppe come luogo di esilio per Erode Archelao, mentre suo fratello Erode Antipa veniva rappresentato come bandito nella vicina Lione.

In quel punto esatto del fiume, le acque sarebbero state agitate da demoniache turbolenze, che ponevano a rischio le navi di passaggio. Inoltre, nel poema "De Vita Pilati", risalente al dodicesimo secolo, era possibile rinvenire un ulteriore elemento informativo: il cadavere maledetto era stato recuperato dalle vorticose acque del fiume per essere trasportato in un altro specifico luogo, situato tra le Alpi, le montagne più alte d'Europa; laggiù, egli era stato gettato in un abisso infernale, accolto con tripudio da fiamme e demoni.

Ma dove si trovava, con precisione, questo abisso posto tra le Alpi? Esiste un racconto medievale che ci narri dove si trovi esattamente questo definitivo luogo di sepoltura di Ponzio Pilato?

Come abbiamo già avuto modo di illustrare all'inizio di questa serie di articoli, nella prima metà del tredicesimo secolo un predicatore domenicano, Stefano di Borbone, aveva scritto, nel suo “Tractatus de diversis materiis predicabilibus”, il seguente passaggio concernente Ponzio Pilato, Vienne e una montagna che si innalzava nelle vicinanze, traendo in parte le proprie parole dalla “Abbreviatio in gestis et miraculis sanctorum” di Jean de Mailly:

«Altri raccontano che a Lione egli [Ponzio Pilato] fu condannato a essere impiccato, ed egli fu impiccato a Vienne [...] E lì, non distante da quei luoghi, su di una montagna prossima a Saint Chamon, egli [Pilato] fu gettato in una profonda cavità; dalla quale si racconta che, quando vi venga gettata dentro una pietra, fuoriescano vapori, e vengano suscitate tempeste».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Alii dicunt quod Lugduni suspendio adjudicatus et apud Viennam est suspensus [...] et ibi prope in monte supra Saint Chamon in puteo projectus; ubi, quando lapis proicitur, fumus inde egredi dicitur, de quo tempestas concitatur»].

Stefano di Borbone era nato nella città francese di Belleville, anch'essa sul fiume Rodano, e distante solamente poche miglia da Lione. Secondo quanto da egli scritto, la misteriosa montagna provvista di abisso infernale nel quale sarebbe stato gettato il corpo di Pilato sarebbe situata vicino a Saint-Chamond, località posta anch'essa nel territorio di Lione. E lì, il rilievo adiacente è chiamato, ancora oggi, 'Massif de Pilat', il massiccio montuoso di Pilato, il cui picco principale è denominato 'Mont de Pilat'.

Dunque, la tomba demoniaca del prefetto della Giudea parrebbe vagare attorno a Lione, prima nel Rodano, e successivamente presso una vicina montagna, in un pozzo che emetterebbe fumo e dal quale si originerebbero tempeste. Dall'altro lato, "De Vita Pilati" indica le Alpi come luogo di sepoltura di Pilato, con annesse fiamme e demoniache presenze (Fig. 2).

Ciò di cui dobbiamo prendere accurata nota è il seguente fatto fondamentale: nessun racconto medievale concernente Pilato cita, in alcun modo, l'area dei Monti Sibillini, in Italia.

E adesso, in quale direzione ci muoveremo? Abbiamo forse terminato con il vagabondaggio di Pilato tra i fiumi e le montagne d'Europa? Non proprio. Perché il prossimo passo condurrà la nostra ricerca verso un altro testo medievale, un grande successo dei propri tempi: si tratta della "Legenda Aurea".

E ci imbatteremo in altre stupefacenti scoperte.











































1 Jul 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /18. A mountain and a demonic burial place
«Pilate grew up as a sensible youth, endowed with the twin virtues of body and mind» (Fig. 1).

[In the original Latin text: «Crevit Pilatus et fit prudens adolescens, corporis et mentis gemina virtute nitescens»].

This is a passage taken from the opening section of the ancient poem “De Vita Pilati” (“The Life of Pilate”), a work dating back, according to scholars, to the twelfth century, but most certainly originating from earlier oral storytelling.

This anonymous work, designed for public readings to be held before delighted audiences, was a most successful piece of literary narration across the Middle Ages, with many manuscripted copies scattered and subsequently retrieved across Europe. “De Vita Pilati” stages one of the most intriguing and riveting characters which are portrayed in the Gospels: Pontius Pilate, a popular figure who used to cast his peculiar fascination on people belonging to all social classes; the man who had ventured himself as far as to deliver Jesus Christ, the Son of God, to a harrowing death.

In the nearly four hundred Latin verses of “De Vita Pilati”, the wicked traits of the prefect of Judaea are greatly emphasized: a representation typical of Middle Ages, according to the antique tradition, mainly operating in the western territories of Europe, which was specifically promoted by Pope St. Gregory the Great with his description of Pontius Pilate as a blood-curdling «limb of the Fiend».

Let's read “De Vita Pilati” from manuscript LIP 51, preserved at the Leiden University, The Netherlands (folia 114r - 118v) (Fig. 2), with the aid of a transcript provided by the French scholar Edélestand du Méril in his "Poésies populaires latines du Moyen Age" (1847, pag. 343 - 357).

Born in the German province's town of Mainz («Moguntia»), the «sensible youth», the son of a king, soon becomes a nasty playmate to his young companions, until «a child is ruthlessly murdered by another child» (in the original Latin text: «puer a puero crudeli morte necatur»). The atrocious crime perpetrated by the young Pilate is soon discovered, and would certainly deserve a death sentence; yet his life is spared and he is sent to Rome as a hostage, never to be set free («Romam transmissus obses, numquam redimatur»).

According to “De Vita Pilati”, when in Rome his evil temper manifested itself once again: he becomes a friend to the son of a king of Britain, a hostage himself; but, as if it had turned into a sort of cruel habit for him, he cuts the throat of his new acquaintance («puerum, sicut fratrem proprium, jugulavit»). Again, he is not put to death owing to his birth and status: he is rather exiled to the island of Pontus, inhabited by barbaric people. There, he rules the island and its unmanageable dwellers, gaining for himself the additional epithet of «Pontius» (in the original Latin text: «Auxit ei nomen locus hic, est namque vocatus - Pontius a Ponto, sublimi sede locatus») (Fig. 3).

The story runs fast towards its ghastly end. Pilate moves to Judaea. The Passion takes place. After Jesus' crucifiction, Emperor Titus is portrayed as being afflicted with leprosy. He is informed of the miracles carried out by Jesus in Judaea, and issues an order to find him and bring him to Rome to cure his disease. But a woman (not named, but the figure is that of Saint Veronica) informs the Emperor that Jesus was killed by Pilate and then rose again and ascended to heaven. In the final verses, Pilate is summoned to Rome before the court of Titus, who is determined to punish him for his role in the crucifiction of Jesus. And, in the capital city of the Roman Empire, the Emperor's rage unleashes unrestrained: it is commanded that he shall «die of an extraordinarily ghastly death, dismembered by wild beasts» (in the original Latin text: «necandus turpi morte nimis feris lacerandus»).

These are the final hours in the life of Pontius Pilate. Overwhelmed by fear and despair, he cuts his throat with a knife, dying in his own dripping blood, thus concluding his life with an unholy gesture, in this way anticipating the punishment that was about to fall on him (in the original Latin text: «tactusque dolore, cultello fodit jugulum, manante cruore occidit infelix, et poenas anticipando perfidiae summam concludit fine nefando») (Fig. 4).

Is Pontius Pilate's earthly journey over? Not in the least.

Because at this point of the narrative, the body of Pilate begins its own, doomed journey. The cursed journey of a corpse which is part of the body of Satan (Fig. 5):

«It was devised that his corpse was not to be buried - it was to be brought far away and cast - into the Rhône, concealed beneath the swirling eddies of the river - But in that place frenzied commotions began to occur - so that any ship that travelled by that spot - immediately vanished into the whirlpool and sank to the abyss».

[In the original Latin text: «Hunc exstinctum non miserunt tumulari - sed procul a patria jusserunt praecipitari - in Rhodanum, latuitque diu sub fluminis unda - Sed huic mansit rabies quaedam furibunda - nam naves quaecunque locum transire volebant - gurgitis extemplo pereuntes ima petebant»].

Again, the river Rhône. Again, the endangered ships, like in Otto of Freising's “Chronica de duabus civitatibus”.

Is this place by the Rhône the city of Vienne again? Yes, as the unknown author of “De Vita Pilati” adds in subsequent lines (Fig. 6):

«Beholding that, the inhabitants of Vienne, amazed by this new evil - went to Lyon determined to find the reason for all that» [in the original Latin text: «Unde Viennenses, novitate mali stupefacti - Lugdunum veniunt causam perquirere facti»].

Why did the citizens of Vienne directed themeselves to the main town in the region? Because there they would address the high priests («pontifices coeunt») and, at the presence of all the people, they would raise a plea to God («auxiliumque Dei communi voce precantur») that this awesome curse might cease («pestis miseranda quiescat»).

The burial place of Pontius Pilate is not a resting place. Something happens at the very spot where he had been thrown into the waters of the river Rhône.

Something evil. Something dreadful. Something abominable.

And “De Vita Pilati” continues with its horrific tale. The whole community sets up a trial ship, hallowed by the presence of holy relics, and, with no crew on board, lets it slide on the river until the boat gets to the very spot where that loathsome corpse had been submerged («inque locum veniens, quo perditus ille jacebat»). All the people follow, praying God and praising Him with sacred songs. And Pilate remains quiet in a ghastly silence:

«All was still, and nothing stirred from the deep» [in the original Latin text: «constitit et nulla penitus se parte movebat»].

Now people know that the power of God is stronger than the iniquity of the Evil. With the help of a dredging barge they sieve the muds at the bottom of the river («amnis machinis lustrare profundum») until, their action blessed by the Heaven, they find the abominable body («et nutu Domini mox invenere malignum»).

What happens next? Where is this hateful body to be buried now?

Something is going to happen that will originate unexpected, far-reaching effects on a small lake placed in the middle of Italy, on the Sibillini Mountain Range.

Because the fiendish corpse of Pontius Pilate, a portion of the body of Satan, an execrable limb of the Fiend, is transferred to a new burial site.

And this time it is set within the most elevated mountains (Fig. 7):

«A place is amid the Alps, as is recorded
from which direful flames visibly erupt.
They dragged Pilate and cast him into it
to be consumed by the fire of Hell, as he deserved.
Often the voices of demons can be heard there,
fiends who rejoice of the death and punishments of the damned [...]
and so the antique curse of the troubled waters ended at last».

[In the original Latin text:
«Alpibus in mediis locus est, sicut memoratur
horrifer et flammas a se proferre probatur
In quem Pilatum traxerunt praecipitandum
atque gehennali, sicut decet, igne cremandum.
Vox ibi multotiens auditur daemoniorum
gaudia sunt quorum mors et poenae miserorum [...]
cessavitque vetus submersio pestis iniquae»].

We started from Vienne, France. We began with a river, the Rhône. However, the corpse of Pontius Pilate, cursed by God himself and celebrated by the demons as a member of their own fiendish essence, is soon transferred to a most suitable place.

A place that might hold him as far away as possible from the human race. A place in which his wicked body might be disposed of in the most suitable way. A place of flames. A place of doom. A place of Hell (Fig. 8).

In this legendary tale, certainly arising from a number of oral variations, Pilate's body is sent into a burning pit set in the Alps, the highest, most inaccessible mountains in Europe (Fig. 9).

Has it anything to do with the Sibillini Mountain Range? Not yet. However, we are getting closer and closer to the precipitous peaks which raise in central Italy. And to the lakes sitting within their blood-curdling glacial cirque.

But the journey of Pilate's corpse is not over yet. We still have to follow its winding route across Europe. So let's take this ride, because our journey is not yet over.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /18. Una montagna e una tomba maledetta
«Pilato era cresciuto come un giovinetto assennato, risplendente delle virtù gemelle del corpo e della mente» (Fig. 1).

[Nel testo originale latino: «Crevit Pilatus et fit prudens adolescens, corporis et mentis gemina virtute nitescens»].

È questo un passaggio tratto dalla parte iniziale dell'antico poema "De Vita Pilati" ("Vita di Pilato"), un'opera risalente, secondo gli studiosi, al dodicesimo secolo, ma che trova certamente origine in narrazioni orali più antiche.

Questo testo anonimo, concepito per la recitazione di fronte a un pubblico emozionato e impressionato, fu un brano letterario che conobbe un grande successo nel corso dei secoli del medioevo, così come attestato dalle numerose copie manoscritte diffuse, e successivamente rinvenute, in tutta Europa. "De Vita Pilati" pone in scena uno dei personaggi più intriganti e affascinanti tra quelli rappresentati nei Vangeli: Ponzio Pilato, una figura popolare che era in grado di affascinare in modo peculiare ascoltatori appartenenti a tutte le classi sociali, l'uomo che aveva osato prendere la decisione di consegnare Gesù Cristo, il Figlio di Dio, a un terribile destino di morte.

Nei quasi quattrocento versi latini di "De Vita Pilati", i malvagi tratti del carattere del prefetto della Giudea sono posti in grande rilievo: una rappresentazione tipica del medioevo, in accordo con l'antica tradizione, viva principalmente nei territori occidentali d'Europa, che fu sostenuta in modo specifico da Papa Gregorio Magno, con la sua descrizione di Ponzio Pilato come una delle agghiaccianti «membra del Demonio».

Leggiamo “De Vita Pilati” dal manoscritto LIP 51, conservato presso la Leiden University, in Olanda (folia 114r - 118v) (Fig. 2), con l'aiuto di una trascrizione effettuata dal filologo francese Edélestand du Méril nelle sue "Poésies populaires latines du Moyen Age" (1847, pag. 343 - 357).

Nato a Mainz («Moguntia»), città appartenente alla provincia tedesca, il «giovinetto assennato», figlio di re, diviene presto un maligno compagno di giochi per i suoi coetanei, finché «un bambino non viene crudelmente ucciso da un altro bambino» (nel testo originale latino: «puer a puero crudeli morte necatur»). L'atroce crimine perpetrato dal giovanissimo Pilato viene rapidamente scoperto, e avrebbe certamente meritato la morte; ma la sua vita viene risparmiata, ed egli è inviato a Roma come ostaggio, privato per sempre della propria libertà («Romam transmissus obses, numquam redimatur»).

Secondo "De Vita Pilati", durante il suo soggiorno in Roma il temperamento malvagio del futuro prefetto ha modo di manifestarsi ancora una volta: egli diviene amico del figlio di un re di Britannia, anch'egli ostaggio; ma, come se ormai fosse per lui divenuta un'abitudine, egli non riesce a trattenersi dal tagliare la gola a quella sua nuova conoscenza («puerum, sicut fratrem proprium, jugulavit»). Di nuovo, Pilato riesce a evitare una condanna a morte grazie al proprio lignaggio e al proprio rango: viene allora esiliato nell'isola del Ponto, abitata solamente da barbari. Là, governando quelle genti recalcitranti, egli si guadagna l'epiteto aggiuntivo di «Ponzio» (nel testo originale latino: «Auxit ei nomen locus hic, est namque vocatus - Pontius a Ponto, sublimi sede locatus») (Fig. 3).

La narrazione corre poi rapida verso il proprio raccapricciante finale. Pilato si trasferisce in Giudea. I fatti della Passioni hanno luogo. In un tempo successivo alla crocifissione di Gesù, l'imperatore Tito, rappresentato come affetto dalla lebbra, viene informato dei miracoli compiuti da Gesù in Giudea: ordina dunque di rintracciare quell'uomo e di condurlo a Roma, affinché l'imperiale malattia possa essere curata. Ma una donna (non esplicitamente nominata, corrispondente però alla figura di Santa Veronica) informa l'imperatore che Gesù è stato ucciso da Pilato, e che poi è risorto ed è asceso al cielo. Nei versi conclusivi, Pilato è richiamato a Roma innanzi alla corte di Tito, il quale è determinato a punirlo duramente per il ruolo rivestito dal prefetto nella crocifissione di Gesù. E, nella capitale dell'Impero Romano, la rabbia dell'imperatore appare dispiegarsi senza alcun freno: viene infatti decretato che Pilato debba «perire di una morte supremamente orribile, smembrato dalle bestie selvagge» (nel testo originale latino: «necandus turpi morte nimis feris lacerandus»).

Giungono così le ultime ore di vita di Ponzio Pilato. Sopraffatto dalla paura e dalla disperazione, egli si recide la gola con un coltello, morendo nel proprio stesso sangue, e concludendo così la propria vita con un gesto di somma empietà, con l'intento di sfuggire alla punizione che stava comunque per ricadere su di lui (nel testo originale latino: «tactusque dolore, cultello fodit jugulum, manante cruore occidit infelix, et poenas anticipando perfidiae summam concludit fine nefando») (Fig. 4).

Termina forse così la vicenda terrena di Ponzio Pilato? Niente affatto.

Perché, a questo punto del racconto, è il cadavere di Pilato a cominciare il proprio viaggio maledetto. Il viaggio sacrilego di un corpo che non è altro che una delle membra di Satana (Fig. 5):

«Fu deciso che il suo corpo non dovesse essere seppellito - ma che dovesse invece essere allontanato e gettato - nel Rodano, per essere occultato dalle correnti del fiume - Ma in quel luogo si levarono agitazioni rabbiose - tali che ogni nave che avesse inteso transitare in quel punto - subito veniva catturata dal gorgo e affondava nell'abisso».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Hunc exstinctum non miserunt tumulari - sed procul a patria jusserunt praecipitari - in Rhodanum, latuitque diu sub fluminis unda - Sed huic mansit rabies quaedam furibunda - nam naves quaecunque locum transire volebant - gurgitis extemplo pereuntes ima petebant»].

Ancora una volta, il fiume Rodano. Ancora una volta, le navi in pericolo, esattamente come nella “Chronica de duabus civitatibus” di Ottone di Frisinga.

Ancora una volta, una città posta sulle rive del Rodano. Si tratta forse, nuovamente, di Vienne? La risposta è affermativa, e ce la fornisce l'anonimo autore della "Vita Pilati" nei versi successivi (Fig. 6):

«Gli abitanti di Vienne, meravigliati alla vista di questa sventura mai veduta prima - decisero di recarsi a Lione per tentare di comprenderne la ragione» [nel testo originale latino: «Unde Viennenses, novitate mali stupefacti - Lugdunum veniunt causam perquirere facti»].

Perché i cittadini di Vienne diressero i propri passi verso la principale città della regione? Perché lì poterono chiedere l'aiuto dei sacerdoti di massimo rango («pontifices coeunt»), e alla presenza di tutto il popolo, innalzare una supplica a Dio («auxiliumque Dei communi voce precantur») affinché quella terrificante maledizione potesse avere termine («pestis miseranda quiescat»).

Il luogo di sepoltura di Ponzio Pilato non è affatto un luogo di eterno riposo. Qualcosa accade nel punto esatto dove egli è stato gettato, tra le acque del fiume Rodano.

Qualcosa di maligno. Qualcosa di terribile. Qualcosa di abominevole.

E "De Vita Pilati" prosegue con il proprio orribile racconto. L'intera comunità appresta una nave speciale, santificata dalla presenza a bordo di sacre reliquie, e, senza alcun equipaggio in essa, l'imbarcazione viene abbandonata alla corrente del fiume, finché non viene raggiunto il punto nel quale quell'immondo corpo si era inabissato («inque locum veniens, quo perditus ille jacebat»). Tutto il popolo segue la scena, pregando Dio e lodandoLo con sacri inni. E Pilato rimane quieto, in un silenzio agghiacciante:

«Tutto fu immobile, e nulla si mosse dalle profondità» [nel testo originale latino: «constitit et nulla penitus se parte movebat»].

Ora il popolo sa con certezza che il potere di Dio è più forte dell'iniquità del Demonio. Con l'aiuto di una draga, il fondo del fiume viene setacciato («amnis machinis lustrare profundum»), finché, l'opera degli uomini benedetta dai cieli, essi riescono a recuperare il ripugnante cadavere («et nutu Domini mox invenere malignum»).

Cosa accade poi? In quale luogo potrà essere sepolto quel corpo esecrabile?

Sta per accadere qualcosa che darà origine a conseguenze inaspettate e incredibili su di un piccolo lago posto al centro dell'Italia, tra le vette del massiccio dei Monti Sibillini.

Perché il cadavere demonico di Ponzio Pilato, una porzione del corpo di Satana, una delle esecrabili membra del Nemico, viene trasferito presso un nuovo luogo di sepoltura.

E, questa volta, si tratta di un luogo posto tra le più elevate montagne (Fig. 7):

«C'è un luogo tra le Alpi, dal quale, così come si ricorda,
terrificanti fiamme visibilmente si levano;
essi presero Pilato e lo precipitarono in esso
affinché fosse consumato dalle fiamme dell'Inferno, così come egli meritava.
Spesso è lì possibile udire le voci dei dèmoni
che gioiscono della morte e delle pene dei dannati [...]
e così ebbe termine l'antica maledizione delle acque».

[Nel testo originale latino:
«Alpibus in mediis locus est, sicut memoratur
horrifer et flammas a se proferre probatur
In quem Pilatum traxerunt praecipitandum
atque gehennali, sicut decet, igne cremandum.
Vox ibi multotiens auditur daemoniorum
gaudia sunt quorum mors et poenae miserorum [...]
cessavitque vetus submersio pestis iniquae»].

Siamo partiti da Vienne, in Francia. Abbiamo cominciato con un fiume, il Rodano. Ma il cadavere di Ponzio Pilato, maledetto da Dio stesso e glorificato dai dèmoni come parte della loro medesima essenza diabolica, viene presto trasferito in un luogo maggiormente acconcio a riceverlo.

Un luogo che possa trattenere quel corpo il più lontano possibile dal consorzio umano. Un luogo nel quale i suoi empi resti possano essere gettati nel modo più opportuno. Un luogo di fiamme. Un luogo di maledizioni. Un luogo d'Inferno (Fig. 8).

Il racconto leggendario, certamente formatosi attraverso una numerosa serie di variazioni orali, spedisce il corpo di Pilato fino a un abisso fiammeggiante situato tra le Alpi, le più elevate e inaccessibili montagne d'Europa (Fig. 9).

Esiste un legame tra tutto questo e i Monti Sibillini? Non ancora. Eppure, ci stiamo avvicinando sempre di più alle precipiti creste che si innalzano nell'Italia centrale. E a quei laghi che riposano all'interno del loro sinistro circo glaciale.

Il viaggio del corpo di Pilato, però, non è ancora terminato. Dobbiamo ancora continuare a seguire il suo tortuoso itinerario attraverso l'Europa. Proseguiamo allora con il nostro viaggio, perché il cammino che dobbiamo compiere non si è ancora concluso.



























































































22 Jun 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /17. A resting place in Vienne, France
There is a remarkable passage which is to be found in Flavius Josephus' “The Jewish War”, written at the end of the first century, only a few decades after Pontius Pilate's life and remarkable deeds. This excerpt does not refers to Pilate; nonetheless, it will mark the legendary tale of our Roman prefect for the centuries to come.

In Book II, Chapter VII, the Roman-Jewish historian recounts the story of Herod Archelaus, the Ethnarch of Judaea from 4 B.C., when Emperor Augustus enthroned him, up to 6 A.D., when the region was finally reduced to a Roman province under the direct rule of a prefect. In his final days, accusations are brought by the Jews before the Emperor, and Archelaus is removed from his post and then exiled (Fig. 1):

«Archelaus took possession of his ethnarchy, and used not the Jews only, but the Samaritans also, barbarously. [...] Whereupon they both sent ambassadors against him to Caesar, and in the ninth year of his government he was banished to Vienne, a city of Gaul, and his effects were put into Caesar's treasury».

And another passage on the exile of Herod Archelaus appears in Flavius Josephus' “Antiquities of the Jews” (Book XVII, Chapter XV) (Fig. 2):

«And when he [Herod Archelaus] had arrived in Rome, Caesar, upon hearing what certain accusers of his had to say, and despite his replies, banished him, and appointed Vienne, a city of Gaul, to be the place of his habitation, and took his money away from him».

Vienne, France, not be be confused with today's Wien (or 'Vindobona' in Latin): set by the river Rhône, the former capital settlement of the Allobroge Gauls, it was a rich and important town of romanised Gaul, a colony established by Julius Caesar with the name 'Colonia Julia Viennensis', mentioned by an imperial address to the Senate rendered by Emperor Claudius, and by Latin poets like Marcus Valerius Martialis, both celebrating the town's wealth and charming appearance. Still today, we can behold the gorgeous Temple of Augustus and Livia, dating to the first century, standing out at the very centre of the modern town, a shadowy remnant of a glorious past (Fig. 3).

This was the place to which Herod Archelaus was banished: a Roman colony set in a northern province of the Empire, far enough from Judaea to be considered as a most fit punishment for a former ruler of the Jews. We must also remember that Vienne is just fifteen miles south of Lyon, or ancient 'Lugdunum', where Archelaus' brother, Herod Antipas, ended his life after having been banished there, too, by Emperor Gaius Caligula, as Flavius Josephus himself recollects in his “Antiquities of the Jews” (Book XVIII, Chapter IX) (Fig. 4):

«[Gaius Caligula] sentenced Herod [Antipas] to perpetual banishment in Lyon, a city of Gaul».

But what has all this story about Vienne and Lyon got to do with Pontius Pilate? Apparently nothing, as Archelaus was exiled twenty years before the Roman prefect started his own rule of Judaea; and Antipas, though living in the same years as Pontius Pilate, is not indicated by Flavius Josephus as having been banished to Gaul together with our Roman prefect, for whom no remark on his final destiny is provided by the Roman-Jews historian.

However, there are some links, and some queer connections between Herod Archelaus, Herod Antipas and Pilate.

Pontius Pilate was a figure who was in close connection to the life and death of Jesus Christ. Instead, Herod Archelaus had nothing to do with Jesus, yet his relatives had a lot: he was son to Herod the Great, well known to Christians for his alleged role in the Massacre of the Innocents, and also brother to Herod Antipas, the ruler of Galilee who played a major role in the Passion. Together with Pilate himself.

Furthermore, just like Pilate some thirty years later, Herod Archelaus had been reported by his subjects to the Emperor in Rome, owing to his ruthless, predatory administration of the territory and people assigned to his rule. And Herod Antipas, too, had been the target of accusations of treason presented before Gaius Caligula by another Herod, Agrippa.

The confusion between the three, Herod Archelaus, Herod Antipas and Pontius Pilate, was ready to unleash its full potential.

Flavius Josephus had never written that Pontius Pilate had been exiled to Gaul, as he had only reported that Pilate was ordered «to go to Rome, to answer before the Emperor to the accusations of the Jews», and that «before he could get to Rome, Tiberius was dead».

Yet, if Herod Archelaus and Herod Antipas had been banished to the region of Lyon and Vienne, a town that ancient Romans had elected as a suitable place of exile, the same destiny was to be assigned to Pilate by later authors.

And Vienne, France, was to became the place where the earthly life of Pontius Pilate would reach its cursed end (Fig. 5):

«Archelaus [...] accused by the Jews for his ruthlessness before Augustus, was exiled to the most noble town of Vienne, in the Gauls. [...] Tetrarch Herod [...] came to Rome; but he was accused by Agrippa and lost his Tetrarchy; he was sent into exile at Vienne, the town in Gaul [...]. Pilate, who had sentenced Jesus Christ to death, was exiled forever in Vienne as well; there, he was so overwhelmed by despair out of Gaius Caligula's questioning, that he stabbed himself with his own hand looking for instant death to escape his sufferings».

[In the original Latin text: «Archelaus [...] accusantibus apud Augustum ferocitatem eius iudaeis, in Viennam urbem Galliae nobilissimam relegatur [...] Herodes tetrarcha [...] Romam venit; sed accusatus ab Agrippa, etiam tetrarchia perdidit; relegatusque exilio, apud Viennam Galliarum urbem [...]. Pilatus qui sententiam dapnationis in Christum dixerat, et ipse perpetuo exilio Vienne recluditur; tantisque ibi inrogante Gaio [Caligula] anguoribus coarctatus est, ut sua se tranfverberans manu malorum compendium mortis celeritate qauesierit»].

These words were written in the ninth century by bishop Ado of Vienne in his “Chronicles of the Six Ages of the World”, and we read them from a beautiful twelfth-century manuscript, the Royal MS 13 A XXIII, preserved at the British Library (folia 41r, 42v and 43r). Vienne: the French town set fifteen miles south of Lyon, by the river Rhône. Now accommodating not only for the two unwilling Herods (Archelaus and Antipas), as already reported by first-century writer Flavius Josephus (who placed the latter in nearby Lyon), but also for another illustrious newcomer, who had got there straight from Judaea, as well: Pontius Pilate.

It is the first time in recorded history that Vienne, Herod Archelaus's and Herod Antipa's place of exile in Gaul, is mentioned as a site connected to the death of Pontius Pilate, the fifth prefect of Judaea. As we already saw in a previous article, Vienne will soon became one of the main resting places for the body of Pilate: a tale that will be told, at the beginning of the thirteenth century, by Stephen of Bourbon in his “Tractatus de diversis materiis predicabilibus”.

The references to Vienne as the location where Pontius Pilate's corpse is buried are not over with bishop Ado's excerpt. Further mentions are found in the subsequent centuries, a clear sign that the story was being successful amid men of letters and oral storytellers.

In the “Historia Scholastica” (which we read from a 1483 manuscripted edition - Fig. 6), written in the twelfth century by Petrus Comestor, a French historian and theologian, we stumble upon the many notorious misdeeds associated to Pontius Pilate's rule of Judaea, as already indicated in such classical sources as Flavius Josephus and Philo of Alexandria:

«At that moment Pilate was already dead. At the very beginnig of his career he was a young man, and prefect of Judaea since the twelfth year of the rule of Tiberius Caesar, Vitellius being in charge for Syria. Many accusations were put forward before Tiberius against him: he was accused by the Jews of the savage killing of many innocent people. Furthermore, he was accused by complaining Jews of having placed the statues of pagan gods in their temple. In addition to that, he was also accused of having stolen money from the temple's treasure to his own utility and to build an aqueduct in his own house».

[In the original Latin text: «Pilatus ergo mortuus iam erat, qui, ut a principio huius historie pretaxatum est, anno xii imperii tiberii cesaris erat procurator iudeae, Vitellio praeside sirie, et accusatus est in multis apud tiberius. Accusatus est a iudeis de violenta innocentum interfectione. Accusatus est etiam, quod iudeis reclamantibus ponebat imagines gentilium in templo. Accusatus est etiam quia pecuniam repositam in corbonam redegerat in usus suos, inde faciens aqueductum in domum suam»].

As we had already the chance to see in previous articles, all that is no news at all. However, Petrus Comestor adds a further piece of information, concerning the place of his exile:

«Because of all this he was banished to Lyon, where he was from, and there he died in the contempt of his own kindred».

[In the original Latin text: «Et pro his omnibus deportatus est in exilium Lugduni unde oriundus erat, ut ibi in opprobrium generis sui moreretur»].

A place for exile, a place for death. And this place is, once again, Vienne, not far from Lyon, France, as further detailed by Petrus Comestor:

«[Pilate] who had been sent into exile at Vienne, where he died» (in the original Latin text: «[Pilatus] qui iam deportatus fuerat in esilium Viennam, et ibi mortuus est»).

In Jean de Mailly 's “Abbreviatio in gestis et miraculis sanctorum” (“A shortened compendium of deeds and miracles of saints”), dating to the middle of the thirteenth century, we find a tale concerning the beheading of St. John the Baptist. And, again, as we can read in thirteenth-century manuscript Latin 10843 preserved at the Bibliothèque Nationale de France, we find Pontius Pilate and Lyon (Fig. 7):

«But the subsequent year Pontius Pilate was accused by the Jews [...] before Tiberius of violence and nothing less than the killing of innocent people [...] and for all this, as Flavius Josephus reports, he was exiled to Lyon, the place where he was from, and there he died in the scorn of his kindred. Yet elsewhere is written that is was sentenced there to eat no cooked food, which is a detail that is not reported by Josephus. But he grieved so much of his doom that he eventually killed himself».

[In the original Latin text: «Sed sequenti anno Poncius Pilatus accusatus est a Judeis [...] apud Tyberium de violentia, scilicet innocentium interfectione [...] et pro hiis omnibus, ut dicit Josephus, deportatus est Lugdunum in exilium unde oriundus erat ut ibi in opprobrium generis sui moreretur. Alibi vero legitur quod ita ibi dampnatus est ut nichil coctum comederet, quod Josephus quidem non dicit. Sed tamen tam vehementer doluit ut se ipsum occideret»].

Lyon and Vienne, Vienne and Lyon. According to all concordant sources, Pontius Pilate died and was buried in the region of Lyon, with an additional detail: he ended his life in Vienne.

Vienne: not a mere folktale of medieval origin, but a true place of banishment, which ancient Romans had selected as a forcible destination for selected high-rank Jews, as attested by Flavius Josephus in the first century, in the ripeness of the Roman Empire.

This tale, now fully involving Pontius Pilate, experienced so great a success that we find it again repeated and expanded in the “Chronica de duabus civitatibus” written by another bishop, Otto of Freising, at the middle of the twelfth-century (we read this passage from folium 42r of manuscript Car. C. 33 (247) preserved at the Zentralbibliothek in Zürich) (Fig. 8):

«And Pilate was so struck with chastisements by Caesar [Gaius Galigula], that they say he killed himself with his dagger. [...] Some also report that he was exiled to Vienne, the town of Gaul, and subsequently drowned into the river Rhône. From this occurrence the local people say that ships are endangered when passing by that spot».

[In the original Latin text: «Pilatus quoque a Cesare tantis malis atteritur, ut suo se gladio interfecisse dicatur. [...] Sunt etiam nonnulli, qui eum apud Viennam urbem Galliae in exilium trusum ac post in Rhodano mersum dicant. Unde usque hodie naves ibi periclitari ab incolis affirmantur»].

Vienne, again. With an additional element, a highly remarkable one indeed: the ships cruising the Rhône are «endangered» when they sail by the exact place where the corpse of Pontius Pilate was thrown into the waters.

Why was this amazing remark included?

It is worthy of notice that this sentence seems to have something in common with the description of the burial place of Caiaphas, the priest of the Jews, as depicted in the “Rescriptum Tiberii”: «the ground would not receive him at all, but cast him out».

What is the meaning of all that?

Before we start treading this remarkable clue, we need to complete our journey into Pilate's many burial places.

It will be a matter of life and death. And of golden legends. Let's go and get into the great medieval success of the gloomy legend of Pontius Pilate's death.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /17. Un luogo di sepoltura a Vienne (Francia)
C'è un passaggio assai significativo che possiamo trovare nella "Guerra giudaica" di Flavio Giuseppe, un'opera scritta alla fine del primo secolo, non molti decenni dopo la vita e le gesta di Ponzio Pilato. Questo brano non si riferisce direttamente a Pilato; eppure saranno proprio queste parole a segnare il racconto leggendario relativo al nostro prefetto romano, per i secoli a venire.

Nel Libro II, Capitolo VII, lo storico romano di origine ebraica racconta la vicenda di Erode Archelao, l'etnarca della Giudea dal 4 a.C., quando la regione gli venne affidata dall'imperatore Tiberio, fino al 6 d.C., quando quelle terre furono infine ridotte a provincia romana sotto il controllo diretto di un prefetto. Durante i suoi ultimi giorni di regno, egli si trova ad essere accusato dai giudei innanzi all'imperatore, fino alla sua rimozione dalla carica e al successivo esilio (Fig. 1):

«Archelao prese possesso della sua etnarchia, e si occupò non solo dei giudei, ma anche dei samaritani, in modo barbaro. [...] Per questo motivo, entrambe le popolazioni inviarono ambasciate a Cesare contro di lui, e nel nono anno del suo dominio egli fu esiliato a Vienne, una città della Gallia, e i suoi beni furono incamerati nel tesoro di Cesare».

E un ulteriore passaggio sull'esilio di Erode Archelao appare anche nelle "Antichità giudaiche" (Libro XVII, Capitolo XV), dello stesso Flavio Giuseppe (Fig. 2):

«E quando egli [Erode Archelao] giunse a Roma, Cesare, nell'ascoltare ciò che alcuni accusatori avevano da riferire contro di lui, e nel considerare le sue giustificazioni, decise di bandirlo, e scelse di inviarlo a Vienne, città della Gallia, come luogo nel quale egli avrebbe dovuto abitare, e trattenne tutto il denaro di sua proprietà».

Vienne, in Francia, da non confondersi con l'odierna Vienna (o Vindobona, in latino): posta sulla rive del Rodano, in precedenza insediamento principale dei Galli Allobrogi, era una ricca e importante città della Gallia romanizzata, una colonia stabilita da Giulio Cesare con il nome di 'Colonia Julia Viennensis', menzionata in un discorso imperiale reso di fronte al Senato dall'Imperatore Claudio, e citata da poeti latini come Marziale, in entrambi i casi celebrata come una città raffinata e piacevolmente attraente. Ancora oggi è possibile ammirare lo splendido Tempio di Augusto e Livia, edificato nel primo secolo, che si staglia nel centro della moderna città, affascinante residuo di un glorioso passato (Fig. 3).

Era questo il luogo nel quale fu esiliato Erode Archelao: una colonia romana situata in una provincia settentrionale dell'Impero, sufficientemente distante dalla Giudea da costituire una punizione efficace per un uomo che aveva governato quelle lontane terre abitate dagli ebrei. Dobbiamo anche ricordare come Vienne si trovi a soli venticinque chilometri a sud di Lione, l'antica 'Lugdunum', presso la quale il fratello di Archelao, Erode Antipa, concluse la propria vita dopo essere stato esiliato in quella città dall'imperatore Caligola, così come annota lo stesso Flavio Giuseppe nelle sue "Antichità giudaiche" (Libro XVIII, Capitolo IX) (Fig. 4):

«[Gaio Caligola] fece bandire Erode [Antipa] per sempre a Lione, città della Gallia».

Ma cosa ha a che fare, questa storia a proposito di Vienne e Lione, con Ponzio Pilato? Apparentemente, nulla, perché Archelao fu bandito circa venti anni prima che il prefetto romano si recasse in Giudea per governare quella provincia; e Antipa, benché contemporaneo di Pilato, non è indicato da Flavio Giuseppe come destinatario dell'esilio in concomitanza con un'analoga pena subita dal prefetto romano, in merito al quale lo storico di origine ebraica nulla scrive che ne racconti la sorte finale.

Nondimeno, alcune connessioni si rendono evidenti, così come alcune particolari legami tra Erode Archelao, Erode Antipa e lo stesso Pilato.

Ponzio Pilato: una figura che si presenta in stretta connessione con la vita e la morte di Gesù Cristo. Erode Archelao, invece, non aveva nulla a che fare con Gesù, ma i suoi parenti più stretti sì: egli, infatti, era figlio di Erode il Grande, ben noto ai Cristiani per il suo supposto ruolo nel Massacro degli Innocenti; ed era anche fratello di Erode Antipa, il re della Galilea che ebbe un ruolo primario nella Passione. Assieme allo stesso Pilato.

Inoltre, proprio come Pilato circa trent'anni dopo, Erode Archelao era stato accusato dai propri sudditi innanzi all'imperatore di Roma, a motivo della sua ammministrazione, rapace e senza scrupoli, del territorio e delle popolazioni a lui assegnate. E anche Erode Antipa era stato oggetto di accuse di alto tradimento, sottoposte all'attenzione di Caligola da un altro Erode, Agrippa.

La confusione tra i tre, Erode Archelao, Erode Antipa e Ponzio Pilato, era pronta per sviluppare pienamente tutto il proprio potenziale.

Flavio Giuseppe non aveva mai scritto che Ponzio Pilato fosse stato esiliato in Gallia, essendosi limitato a riferire che Pilato fu costretto «a recarsi a Roma per rispondere, di fronte all'imperatore, delle accuse presentate dai Giudei», e che «prima che egli potesse giungere a Roma, Tiberio era morto».

Eppure, se Erode Archelao ed Erode Antipa erano stati esiliati nella regione di Lione e a Vienne, una città che era stata prescelta dagli antichi romani come luogo adatto ad ospitare importanti personaggi in esilio, lo stesso destino doveva essere assegnato, da autori più tardi, anche a Ponzio Pilato.

E Vienne, in Francia, sarebbe divenuto il luogo nel quale l'esistenza terrena di Pilato avrebbe raggiunto il suo estremo, sciagurato termine (Fig. 5):

«Archelao [...] accusato dai Giudei innanzi ad Augusto per la sua ferocia, fu relegato presso la nobilissima città di Vienna, nelle Gallie. [...] Erode il Tetrarca [...] si recò a Roma; ma fu accusato da Agrippa, e fu privato della sua Tetrachia; egli fu relegato in esilio a Vienne, una città delle Gallie [...] Pilato, che aveva condannato Cristo a morte, fu recluso in perpetuo esilio a Vienne; lì, egli fu preso da tanta disperazione a causa degli interrogatori subìti da Gaio Caligola, che si trafisse infine con la sua stessa mano, tentando in questo modo di sfuggire alle proprie sventure per mezzo di una rapida morte».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Archelaus [...] accusantibus apud Augustum ferocitatem eius iudaeis, in Viennam urbem Galliae nobilissimam relegatur [...] Herodes tetrarcha [...] Romam venit; sed accusatus ab Agrippa, etiam tetrarchia perdidit; relegatusque exilio, apud Viennam Galliarum urbem [...]. Pilatus qui sententiam dapnationis in Christum dixerat, et ipse perpetuo exilio Vienne recluditur; tantisque ibi inrogante Gaio [Caligula] anguoribus coarctatus est, ut sua se tranfverberans manu malorum compendium mortis celeritate qauesierit»].

Queste parole furono vergate nel nono secolo dal vescovo Adone di Vienne nelle sue "Cronache delle sei età del mondo", e possiamo trovarle in un bellissimo manoscritto del dodicesimo secolo, il Royal MS 13 A XXIII, conservato presso la British Library (folia 41r, 42v e 43r). Vienne: la città francese posta a venticinque chilometri da Lione, a sud, sulle rive del fiume Rodano. Che ora ospita non solamente i due malcapitati Erodi (Archelao e Antipa, quest'ultimo nella vicina Lione), come già riferito da Flavio Giuseppe nel primo secolo (che pose Antipa nella vicina Lione), ma anche un nuovo illustre personaggio, giunto direttamente, anche lui, dalla Giudea: Ponzio Pilato.

È la prima volta nella storia, per quanto a noi noto, che Vienne, il luogo dell'esilio di Erode Archelao ed Erode Antipa, in Gallia, viene menzionato come un sito collegato alla morte di Ponzio Pilato, il quinto prefetto della Giudea. Come abbiamo avuto modo di vedere in un precedente articolo, presto Vienne diventerà uno dei principali luoghi di sepoltura per il corpo di Pilato: si tratta del racconto che verrà narrato, all'inizio del tredicesimo secolo, da Stefano di Borbone nel suo “Tractatus de diversis materiis predicabilibus”.

I riferimenti a Vienne come il luogo nel quale il corpo di Ponzio Pilato fu sepolto non terminano affatto con il brano del vescovo Adone. Possiamo rinvenire ulteriori riferimenti nel corso dei secoli successivi, un chiaro segno che il racconto stava riscuotendo un significativo successo, sia tra gli uomini di lettere che tra i narratori orali.

Nell'"Historia Scholastica", scritta nel dodicesimo secolo da Pietro Comestore, storico e teologo francese, e che andiamo a leggere da una edizione manoscritta risalente al 1483, ci imbattiamo nei numerosi misfatti notoriamente associati all'amministrazione di Ponzio Pilato della Giudea, così come già indicato nelle fonti classiche, quali Flavio Giuseppe e Filone di Alessandria:

«A quel tempo Pilato era già morto, ma all'inizio della sua storia, quando egli era ancora giovane, nell'anno dodicesimo dell'imperio di Tiberio Cesare, egli era procuratore della Giudea, con Vitellio a capo della Siria, e fu accusato di molti delitti innanzi a Tiberio. Fu infatti accusato dai giudei di avere ucciso con violenza molti innocenti. Inoltre, egli fu anche accusato dai giudei di avere posto staue pagane nel loro tempio. Oltre a ciò, egli venne accusato di avere tratto il denaro conservato nel tesoro del tempio e di averlo utilizzato per i propri scopi, al fine di costruire un acquedotto per il suo stesso palazzo».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Pilatus ergo mortuus iam erat, qui, ut a principio huius historie pretaxatum est, anno xii imperii tiberii cesaris erat procurator iudeae, Vitellio praeside sirie, et accusatus est in multis apud tiberius. Accusatus est a iudeis de violenta innocentum interfectione. Accusatus est etiam, quod iudeis reclamantibus ponebat imagines gentilium in templo. Accusatus est etiam quia pecuniam repositam in corbonam redegerat in usus suos, inde faciens aqueductum in domum suam»].

Come già sappiamo, non si tratta certo di novità. Ma Pietro Comestore aggiunge un ulteriore elemento informativo, relativo proprio al luogo dell'esilio di Pilato:

«E a causa di tutto questo egli fu deportato in esilio a Lione, essendo originario di questo luogo, e lì terminò la sua vita tra il disprezzo della sua stessa gente».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Et pro his omnibus deportatus est in exilium Lugduni unde oriundus erat, ut ibi in opprobrium generis sui moreretur»].

Un luogo d'esilio, un luogo per morire. E questo luogo è, ancora una volta, Vienne, non lontano da Lione, in Francia, come precisa ancora Pietro Comestore:

«[Pilate] che era stato esiliato a Vienne, dove morì» (nel testo originale latino: «[Pilatus] qui iam deportatus fuerat in esilium Viennam, et ibi mortuus est»).

Nella “Abbreviatio in gestis et miraculis sanctorum” di Jean de Mailly, risalente alla metà del tredicesimo secolo, troviamo un racconto relativo alla decollazione di San Giovanni Battista. E, di nuovo, come possiamo leggere nel manoscritto duecentesco Latin 10843 conservato presso la Bibliothèque Nationale de France, ritroviamo Ponzio Pilato e Lione:

«Ma l'anno successivo Ponzio Pilato fu accusato dai giudei [...] innanzi a Tiberio, per le sue violenze e per il massacro di persone innocenti [...] E a causa di tutto ciò, come riferito da Flavio Giuseppe, fu relegato in esilio a Lione, luogo del quale egli era originario, e lì egli morì tra il disprezzo della sua stessa gente. Altrove si legge, invece, che egli fu condannato a non potersi più nutrire di alcunché di cotto, occorrenza che però Flavio Giuseppe non riporta. Ma egli se ne dolse così intensamente da porre termine, infine, alla propria vita».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Sed sequenti anno Poncius Pilatus accusatus est a Judeis [...] apud Tyberium de violentia, scilicet innocentium interfectione [...] et pro hiis omnibus, ut dicit Josephus, deportatus est Lugdunum in exilium unde oriundus erat ut ibi in opprobrium generis sui moreretur. Alibi vero legitur quod ita ibi dampnatus est ut nichil coctum comederet, quod Josephus quidem non dicit. Sed tamen tam vehementer doluit ut se ipsum occideret»].

Lione e Vienne, Vienne e Lione. Secondo quanto indicato concordemente da tutte le fonti, Ponzio Pilato morì e fu sepolto nella regione di Lione, con un ulteriore dettaglio: egli terminò la propria vita a Vienne.

Vienne: non una mera favoletta medievale, ma un vero, effettivo luogo di esilio, che gli antichi romani avevano prescelto come destinazione forzata per alcuni esponenti di alto rango appartenenti al popolo ebraico, così come attestato da Flavio Giuseppe nel primo secolo, all'apice della potenza dell'Impero Romano.

Questo racconto, ora coinvolgente pienamente Ponzio Pilato, ebbe un tale successo da ripresentarsi ancora, ripetuto e ulteriormente sviluppato, nella “Chronica de duabus civitatibus”, redatta da un altro vescovo, Ottone di Frisinga, alla metà del dodicesimo secolo (andiamo a leggere questo brano così come si presenta nel folium 42r del manoscritto Car. C. 33 (247) conservato presso la Zentralbibliothek di Zurigo) (Fig. 8):

«E Pilato fu così oppresso dalle punizioni di Cesare [Gaio Caligola], che dicono si sia tolto la vita con il proprio stesso gladio. [...] Altri invece raccontano che egli fu inviato in esilio a Vienne, città della Gallia, dove si dice che egli sia stato annegato nel Rodano. E proprio per questo la gente del luogo sostiene che le navi che transitano in quella zona corrano dei pericoli».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Pilatus quoque a Cesare tantis malis atteritur, ut suo se gladio interfecisse dicatur. [...] Sunt etiam nonnulli, qui eum apud Viennam urbem Galliae in exilium trusum ac post in Rhodano mersum dicant. Unde usque hodie naves ibi periclitari ab incolis affirmantur»].

Ancora Vienne. Con un elemento aggiuntivo, e in realtà assai notevole: le imbarcazioni che navigano lungo il Rodano «corrono dei pericoli» nel momento in cui si trovano a transitare nel luogo esatto in cui il corpo di Ponzio Pilato fu gettato nelle acque.

Perché venne inserito questo singolare accenno?

È degno di nota il fatto che questa frase parrebbe avere qualcosa in comune con la descrizione del luogo di sepoltura di Caifa, il sacerdote dei giudei, così come menzionato nel “Rescriptum Tiberii”: «la terra si rifiuta di riceverlo, e lo rigetta fuori».

Cosa significa tutto ciò?

Prima di cominciare a investigare questo notevolissimo indizio, dobbiamo però completare il nostro viaggio attraverso i molti luoghi di sepoltura di Pilato.

Si tratterà di una questione di vita e di morte. E di leggende auree. Partiamo insieme, e andiamo a scoprire il grande successo medievale della tenebrosa leggenda che racconta della morte di Ponzio Pilato.








































































































































11 Jun 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /16. An excruciating death
As our investigation proceeds further into the centuries of the Middle Ages, the figure of Pontius Pilate increasingly darkens, in a vortex of different Emperors, punishments and final dooms for the prefect who presided over the trial and death of Jesus Christ.

In the seventh century, a Greek chronicler, John of Antioch, wrote a history of the world called “Historia chronike”, of which only fragmentary excerpts have reached our present times. Specific passages are found in a collection of Greek texts compiled by Bizantyne Emperor Constantine VII Porphyrogenitus, whose title is “On virtues and vices” and which is present in a single manuscript only (Codex Turonensis 980 preserved at the Municipal Library of Tours, France - Fig. 1). In a passage concerning Emperor Nero, we find the following words that reports about the punishment of Pilate (Fig. 2):

«Nero dedicated himself to the study of philosophy, and he was eager to know about the Christ, who he tought was still alive. But when he happened to know that the Jews had crucified him, he was so irritated that he commanded that Annas and Caiaphas and Pilate be brought in chains before him. [...] Nero had Pilate imprisoned [...] and soon afterwards he had his head cut off, because Pilate had be so bold as to sentence to death so grand a man without any permission by his king».

A similar narration is found in a wondrous Byzantine work called “Suda” or “Souidas”, the amazing encyclopedic collection of some 30,000 entries written around the tenth century and including a bounty of valuable information on the ancient world and many quotes from classical authors that otherwise would have gone lost. Under the entry 'Nero', which we read from a 1581 edition in Latin, we retrieve the same tale we already found in John of Antioch, with the following unexpected variations (Fig. 3):

«Nero, irritated, threw Pilate into prison [...]. Simon the Magus was then at his prime. And when Peter and Simon were arguing in the presence of Nero, Pilate was brought from the prison. And when the three were standing beside Nero, he asked Simon, 'Are you the Christ?' and he said, 'Yes I am'. Next he asked Peter, 'Or, are you the Christ instead?' and Peter said, 'No; I was standing beside him when he was taken up into heaven'. And [Nero] asked Pilate, 'Which out of these men is the one called Christ?'. And he said, 'Neither one; for on the one hand, Peter was one of his disciples and [...] he denied him, saying, 'I do not know the man'. [...] On the other hand, this Simon was in no way known to me, and he has nothing in resemblance to that one, this Simon seems to me of Egyptian origin instead [...]'. Therefore, the Emperor, in rage, on the one hand against Simon, having cheated by lies and having said himself [to be] Christ, on the other hand against Peter, having denied his teacher, threw them out from the council. He cut off Pilate's head, as one daring to kill such an illustrious man without the Emperor's command».

Pilatus, Tiberius, Vespasian, Nero, St. Peter and Simon the Magus, the self-styled wizard described in the Acts of the Apostles, who, according to an apocryhal tradition, resided in Rome and performed miracles like Jesus. The more we advance into the Middle Ages, the more the tales about the now legendary figure of Pilate pile up one after the other, with frequent variations as each account incorporates fragments of previous versions and adds further fanciful details to the whole story. Clearly enough, multiple flows of oral narratives are undergoing different transformations and combinations, as the centuries roll by and Pilate continues to arouse the interest of fascinated audiences across Europe, both in the East and in the West.

In the year 1050, a Byzantine historian, George Kedrenos, also known as Cedrenus, reached unprecedented levels of cruelty when describing the excruciating death which had been experienced by Pontius Pilate. Here is what he writes in his “Synopsis historion”, as taken from a Latin edition published in 1566 (Fig. 4):

«According to some sources, under the rule of Gaius Caesar, Pontius Pilate was subject to several misfortunes, so much so that he committed suicide; others say that, after having being accused before Caesar on his deeds with Jesus by Mary Magdalene, he was sealed within a skin of an ox together with a rooster, a viper and a monkey, the way Romans used to do, and then exposed to the scorching sun; finally, there are many who assert he died after having been flayed alive as a goatskin».

This crude description is not also reminiscent of the deadly punishment suffered by the Jewish high priest Annas in the “Rescriptum Tiberii”, but also of the most famous 'poena cullei' ('punishment in a leather sack'), in use for centuries across the Roman Empire for parricides, and widely documented in several classical sources, in some cases with the addition of a fourth animal, a dog.

This tale shows that Pilate has been considered, in some traditions, as a most wicked criminal, deserving the atrocious sanction devised for those who kill their own father.

What is going on with Pontius Pilate, in such early centuries of the Middle Ages?

The remarkable fact is that a narrative framework is slowly emerging from the many tales, both literary and oral, which circulated in Europe as to the Roman prefect who did not protect Jesus Christ from his excruciating Passion.

The emerging tale was that Pilate had actually received the reward he had deserved, in the form of a brutal, merciless death, or even as a desperate suicide.

This meant that his corpse had to be disposed of.

Some burial place was now needed, so that the tales could be fitted with a suitable conclusion.

And a burial place actually pops up. One we already know (Fig. 5).

However, this is not a lake in the Italian Sibillini Mountain Range. This is Vienne, France.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /16. Una fine spaventosa
Con il procedere della nostra investigazione attraverso i secoli del medioevo, la figura di Ponzio Pilato diviene a mano a mano più oscura, in un turbinare di differenti imperatori, punizioni e terrificanti esiti finali, tutti connessi a quel prefetto che presiedette al giudizio e alla successiva morte di Gesù Cristo.

Nel settimo secolo, un cronista greco, Giovanni di Antiochia scrisse una storia del mondo intitolata “Historia chronike”, della quale sono giunti fino a noi solo brani frammentari. Alcuni passaggi specifici sono rinvenibili in una collezione di testi greci compilata dall'imperatore bizantino Costantino VII Porfirogenito, raccolti sotto il titolo "Delle virtù e dei vizi" e oggi reperibili in un solo manoscritto (Codex Turonensis 980, conservato presso la Bibliothèques de la Ville de Tours in Francia - Fig. 1). In un brano relativo all'imperatore Nerone, è possibile rinvenire le seguenti parole che riguardano proprio la punizione subìta da Pilato (Fig. 2):

«Nerone si dedicò allo studio della filosofia, e desiderò moltissimo conoscere la storia del Cristo, che egli pensava fosse ancora in vita. Ma quando fu informato della circostanza che i giudei lo avevano fatto crocifiggere, ne fu così irritato da ordinare che Anna, Caifa e Pilato fossero condotti in catene al suo cospetto. [...] Nerone fece imprigionare Pilato [...] e poco tempo dopo lo fece decapitare, perché Pilato aveva osato condannare a morte un uomo così importante senza alcuna autorizzazione da parte del suo imperatore».

Un racconto analogo è reperibile in una straordinaria opera bizantina denominata "Suda" o "Souidas", una soprendente raccolta enciclopedica costituita da circa 30.000 voci, redatta attorno al decimo secolo e comprendente una grande quantità di informazioni preziosissime concernenti il mondo antico, nonché numerosissime citazioni da autori classici, che sarebbero andate altrimenti perdute. Alla voce 'Nerone', che andiamo a leggere da una edizione in latino pubblicata nel 1581, possiamo trovare la medesima narrazione già da noi rintracciata in Giovanni di Antiochia, ma con le seguenti inattese variazioni (Fig. 3):

«Nerone, nella sua ira, fece gettare Pilato in prigione [...] A quell'epoca, Simon Mago si trovava nelle grazie dell'imperatore. E mentre Pietro e Simone stavano discutendo alla presenza dello stesso Nerone, Pilato fu tratto dalla prigione e condotto presso di loro. E quando tutti e tre si trovarono di fronte a Nerone, l'imperatore chiese a Simone: ' Sei forse tu il Cristo?' Ed egli rispose, 'Sì, lo sono'. Poi l'imperatore si rivolse a Pietro: 'O forse sei tu, il Cristo?' Ed egli rispose: 'No; io gli ero accanto quando egli ascese al cielo'. Poi [Nerone] chiese a Pilato: 'Quale di questi due uomini è il Cristo?'. Ed egli rispose: 'Nessuno dei due; per quanto riguarda Pietro, egli fu effettivamente un suo discepolo e [...] fu lui a rinnegarlo dicendo 'Io non conosco quest'uomo'. [...] Per quanto riguarda questo Simone, io non lo ho mai conosciuto prima, né egli presenta alcuna somiglianza con il Cristo, anzi a me pare che egli sia di origine egizia [...]'. Perciò l'imperatore, provando ira profonda sia contro Simone, che aveva mentito affermando di essere il Cristo, sia contro Pietro, che aveva rinnegato il proprio maestro, li fece gettare fuori dalla sala del consiglio. Fece inoltre tagliare la testa di Pilato, perché aveva osato far uccidere un uomo così illustre senza alcuna autorizzazione imperiale».

Pilato, Tiberio, Vespasiano, Nerone, San Pietro e Simon Mago, il sedicente incantatore descritto negli Atti degli Apostoli che, secondo le tradizioni apocrife, si recò nella Roma imperiale e operò miracoli come Gesù. Più ci addentiamo nel medioevo, più le narrazioni a proposito dell'ormai leggendaria figura di Pilato si accumulano l'una dopo l'altra, con frequenti variazioni dovute al fatto che ogni nuovo racconto tende a incorporare frammenti appartenenti alle precedenti versioni, senza tralasciare di aggiungere nuovi fantasiosi dettagli all'intera storia. È evidente come il fluire di molteplici linee di narrazione orale abbia generato numerose trasformazioni e combinazioni attraverso il continente europeo, mentre i secoli continuano a scorrere e Pilato non cessa di affascinare un pubblico assai vasto, a oriente come a occidente.

Nell'anno 1050, uno storico bizantino, Giorgio Cedreno, raggiunse inediti livelli di crudezza nel descrivere le raccapriccianti circostanze della morte di Ponzio Pilato. Ecco infatti cosa egli scrive nella sua "Synopsis historion", così come reperibile in una traduzione latina pubblicata nel 1566 (Fig. 4):

«Secondo alcune fonti, durante l'imperio di Gaio Cesare, Ponzio Pilato subì varie sventure, tanto da commettere infine suicidio; altri raccontano, invece, che dopo essere stato accusato da Maria Maddalena per il suo fondamentale ruolo nella morte di Gesù, egli fu cucito all'interno di una pelle di bue, assieme a un gallo, a una vipera e a una scimmia, così come in uso presso i romani, e abbandonato sotto il sole rovente; e c'è anche chi narra di come egli sia morto dopo essere stato scuoiato vivo come un'otre».

Questa cruda descrizione ci ricorda non solo la condanna a morte subìta dal sommo sacerdote giudeo Anna così come descritta nel "Rescriptum Tiberii", ma anche la famosissima 'poena cullei' ('supplizio del sacco di cuoio'), in uso per secoli, ai tempi dei romani, per i parricidi, e largamente documentata in svariate fonti classiche, in molti casi con l'aggiunta di un quarto animale, un cane.

Questo racconto non fa che mostrare come Pilato sia stato considerato, in alcune tradizioni, come un malvagio criminale, che meritava l'atroce punizione prevista per coloro che avessero ucciso il proprio stesso padre.

Cosa sta succedendo alla figura di Ponzio Pilato, nel corso di questi secoli dell'Alto Medioevo?

Il fatto significativo è che, a poco a poco, ci troviamo ad assistere all'emergere di un peculiare schema narrativo, che circola attraverso l'Europa in forma tanto letteraria quanto orale, a proposito di quel prefetto romano che non volle proteggere Gesù Cristo dalla tortura della Passione.

Il racconto che stava emergendo era quello di un Pilato che aveva infine ottenuto la ricompensa che si era meritata, nella forma di un morte brutale e spietata, o comunque di un disperato suicidio finale.

E ciò significava che sarebbe stato necessario occuparsi, in un modo o nell'altro, del suo corpo.

Stava sorgendo l'esigenza di reperire un idoneo luogo di sepoltura, in modo da permettere a quei racconti di concludersi nel modo più opportuno.

E, in effetti, un luogo di sepoltura comincia a fare la propria apparizione. Un luogo che già conosciamo (Fig. 5).

Non si tratta, però, di un lago posto tra le vette dei Monti Sibillini, in Italia. Si tratta, invece, di Vienne. In Francia.





























































































7 Jun 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /15. Recalled and punished
In this series of articles, we are exploring the figure and myth of Pontius Pilate, the Roman prefect who was ruling Judaea when Jesus Christ underwent his harrowing Passion.

As per our previous descriptions of the literary tradition concerning Pilate, we saw that a peculiar line can be retrieved across the centuries which depicts Pontius Pilate as a man who was struck and amazed at the vision of the miracles which occurred during and after the Passion (Fig. 1), so much so that he began to be considered as a sort of prospective Christian or even as a full convert to the new rising religion; this tradition evolved, especially in the Eastern churches, up to unexpected results, including celebration as a saint by the Ethiopian Orthodox Church.

In the Western tradition, the course of Pilate's travel through literary history has proved to be quite different, with a different outcome altogether.

We started from the bishop of Milan, St. Ambrose, who in the fourth century highlighted the unholy behaviour of Pontius Pilate, an unrighteous judge acting in darkness. And then we saw the blood-curdling words written by Pope Gregory I the Great in the sixth century, who portrayed Pilate as a veritable limb of Satan, fully controlled by the evil will of the Fiend.

This is the visible result of a process that was already on its way during the preceding centuries, marked by a number of literary witnesses which present Pilate as being recalled to Rome by his Emperor to suffer punishment, out of his wicked management of Jesus Christ's Passion and death.

And this is no matter of addressing a mere report to Tiberius, as mentioned by Tertullianus, Eusebius of Caesarea and Paulus Orosius: we now see Pontius Pilate summoned before the imperial ruler, and condemned for having handed over Jesus, the Son of God, to the Jews, after having carelessly washed his hands before the mob.

We already saw the “Paradosis Pilati” (“The hand-over of Pilate”), an ancient apocryphal text written in Greek, in which Pilate is recalled to Rome in chains:

«When the report arrived in Rome and was read to Caesar, with many people listening to it too, all stood in amazement at the news of the darkness and the earthquake that had come upon the world because of the lawlessness of Pilate. Caesar, in rage, ordered his soldiers to bring Pilate to him as a prisoner».

In the “Paradosis”, the Roman prefect is held guilty of his rash, coward handling of such a crucial matter as the trial of the Son of God:

«When Pilate was brought to Rome [... the Emperor] ordered Pilate to stand forward and said to him: 'How could you dare to act as you did, you most impious man, if you had the chance to see the great signs concerning that man? With your wicked behaviour, you have destroyed the whole world. [...] You should have guarded him [Jesus] from the Jews [...] for it is clear from the those signs that Jesus was the Christ, the king of the Jews».

The Emperor utters many other enraged words against his former prefect, and finally he sentences him to death (Fig. 2):

«As this man [Pilate] raised his hand against the righteous man called Christ, so shall he fall in the same way and find no salvation».

Despite the accusations, in the above narration the tradition which depicts Pilate as a Christian convert is fully present («I myself was convinced by his deeds that he is greater than all the gods whom we worship», he tells the Emperor) and in the very moment of his beheading an angel takes his falling head and takes it to heaven, as we already described in a previous article.

The more we venture ourselves into the Middle Ages, the more the legend of a Pontius Pilate recalled in Rome and punished for his role in the Passion expands and gets stronger.

And, at the same time, we get closer and closer to the account made by Antoine de la Sale, centuries later, on the Lakes of Pilatus and the Sibillini Mountain Range.

What are we referring to? Let's go and see it.

We are now going to consider the “Vindicta Salvatoris” (“The vengeance of the Saviour”), a medieval text dating to the High Middle Ages and presenting various textual versions, which we read from a very ancient manuscript: Latin 5327 preserved at the Bibliothèque Nationale de France, which comes to us from the tenth century.

The “Vindicta” describes, with the introduction of conspicuous confusion among unrelated historical events and rulers, a campaign against the town of Jerusalem carried out jointly by Vespasian and Titus, the latter being not the well-known Emperor's son but instead the ruler of «Burdigala», today's Bordeaux in Aquitaine, France, a town subject to Emperor Tiberius. The war is waged to avenge the murder of Jesus Christ, so that «they know that no other Lord is equal to Him on the whole world» («ut cognoscant quia non est similis eius dominus super faciem terrae», in the original Latin text, folium 56v - Fig. 3).

Jerusalem is taken after a siege which lasts seven years. The town's inhabitants are slaughtered by the Romans. Then, we find again our poor prefect, who seems to be still alive and kicking under the reign of Vespasian (folium 57v - Fig. 4):

«Pilate was seized and [...] put in a prison in Damascus under the custody of four squads made up by four soldiers each, who were standing before the prison's door».

[In the original Latin text: «Et adprehenderunt Pilatum [...] et miserunt eum in Damasco in carcere et miserunt ei custodes quattuor quaternionum ante portam carceris»].

Following the listed events, Tiberius sends his envoy Velosianus from Rome to Judaea to carry out an enquiry into the death of Jesus. And, when he questions Pilate, he addresses him with the following words (folium 58v - Fig. 5): «'Why did you murder the Son of God?' Pilate replied: 'His fellow-countrymen delivered Him to me'. So Velosianus said: 'For sure you will die for this'» (in the original Latin text: «'Quare interfecisti filium dei?' Pilatus autem dixit: 'Gens sua tradiderunt illum'. Velosianus autem dixit: 'Manifeste moriturus eris'»).

Then we find a reference to the fate of Pontius Pilate, as it will appear more clearly in later texts: by the order of Tiberius, Pilatus, that cursed man («hunc hominem maledictum»), is thrown into a prison called 'Gehenna' («in Gehenne carcere»), amid the most harrowing torments, locked and sealed there so that the earth shall not see him never again («in tormentorum et sub claude eum sub sigillo annulum et amplius non aperiat super terram») (folium 61r - Fig. 6). We will later see that 'Gehenna' is not the place mentioned in the Old Testament and Gospels as the destination for evil people and sinners, but rather a corrupted reference to the ancient town of Vienne, in Gaul (France), which plays a major role in the legend of Pontius Pilate.

So, this narration does not provide a full account of Pilate's execution; yet, once again, in the Western medieval tradition Pontius Pilate is fully held guilty of the killing of Jesus Christ, with no space for sanctity or prospect Christianity.

In addition to that, it is important to stress the fact that here we stumble into something we already know. We find Pilate and Vespasian together, actually an account that is similar to the one reported by Antoine de la Sale in his fifteenth-century “The paradise of Queen Sibyl” (Fig. 7):

«Tales are told that when Titus son of Vespasian, the Emperor of Rome, had crushed down the town of Jerusalem, which some say that it was made to avenge the death of Our Lord Jesus Christ [...] when he came back to Rome he brought with him Pilate who at that time was an officier at the said town of Jerusalem».

[In the original French text: «se compte que quant titus de vespasien empereur de romme eut destruitte la cite de Jherusalem la quelle aucuns disent que ce fut pour la vengence de la mort Nostre Sieu Jhesuscrist [...] au retour que fist a romme, mena avecques soy pillate qui pour ce temps estoit officier en la ditte cite de Jherusalem»].

Clues begin to fit in, elements start joining each other. Antoine de la Sale, with his accompanying peasants, is just reporting an older tale, an instance of whom is the “Vindicta Salvatoris”, in which Pontius Pilate lives side by side with Vespasian and Titus, who are looking for revenge for Jesus' death.

Is this the only clue that leads us towards the Sibillini Mountain Range, Antoine de la Sale and the legendary tale on Pilate and his lake?

Not at all. Because something very remarkable also happens in a different text which describes the death of Pilatus.

It is the “Rescriptum Tiberii”, also known as the “Epistola Tiberii ad Pilatum”, a Greek text which scholars date to the eleventh century on the basis of linguistic considerations (we take a version of it from folia 282v and 283r of manuscript Grec 1771 preserved at the Bibliothèque Nationale de France - Fig. 8). A transcript from Greek is found in M. R. James' “Apocrypha Anecdota” (Part II, pag. 78) and a translation into English is provided by Roger Pearse.

In this letter, allegedly addressed to Pilate by Tiberius, after the customary accusations uttered by the Emperor against his prefect, he informs the governor that «just as you condemned this one unjustly and delivered him to death, I in turn will deliver you to death justly». Then, Pilate and all the leaders of the Jews, including Archelaus, brother to Herod Antipas, and the chief priests Caiaphas and Annas, are seized and taken to Rome. Pilate is «bricked up in a certain cave, and abandoned there».

So Pontius Pilate ends up his life buried in an underground place (oddly enough, in this narrative he will be killed by a stray arrow which penetrates into the cave through a hole after having been shot by the same Tiberius during a deer hunt). This is a prefiguration of the lakes and pits that will conceal his body on several mountains in France, Switzerland and Italy.

However, what we find here is even more interesting. Because, according to the “Rescriptum Tiberii”, while Archelaus is impaled and Annas is sealed into the skin of an ox subsequently exposed to the scorching sun, it is Caiaphas who foretells the peculiar doom that Pontius Pilate will meet in later tales: during his journey towards Rome, the chief priest dies suddenly when in the island of Crete; and when they try to bury his corpse, the ground refuses to receive it, and casts him out.

This is no less than a first instance of that remarkable feature which will always mark Pilate's resting places: storms, as described by Antoine de la Sale in his “The paradise of Queen Sibyl”, and hail and vapours, and a general commotion of the earth that seems to erupt with violence from the very ground.

A ground which does not seem to be happy at all to harbour the dead body of Pilate. One of the limbs of Satan.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /15. Richiamato e punito
In questa serie di articoli, stiamo esplorando la figura e il mito di Ponzio Pilato, il prefetto di Roma che governava la Giudea quando Gesù Cristo subì la propria atroce Passione.

Come già illustrato nel corso del nostro viaggio attraverso la tradizione letteraria concernente Pilato, abbiamo rilevato come, attraverso i secoli, sussista una peculiare rappresentazione di Pilato che tende a dipingere quel governatore romano come un uomo toccato nel profondo alla vista degli eventi miracolosi occorsi durante e dopo la Passione (Fig. 1), tanto da essere considerato come un potenziale cristiano o, addirittura, come un vero e proprio convertito alla nuova, nascente religione; questa tradizione ha finito per evolversi, specialmente nelle chiese orientali, nella direzione di risultati del tutto inattesi, come la venerazione, in qualità di santo, da parte della Chiesa Ortodossa Etiope.

Nella tradizione occidentale, invece, la rotta del lungo viaggio di Pilato attraverso la propria storia letteraria ha rivelato un corso del tutto differente, con un punto di arrivo completamente diverso.

Siamo partiti dal vescovo di Milano, Ambrogio, che già nel quarto secolo volle porre in evidenza l'empio comportamento di Ponzio Pilato, giudice iniquo operante nella tenebra. In seguito, abbiamo potuto considerare le agghiaccianti parole scritte, nel sesto secolo, da Papa Gregorio Magno, il quale ha inteso raffigurare Pilato come una delle membra di Satana, sotto il pieno controllo del demonio e del suo malvagio potere.

È questo il risultato visibile di un processo che risultava essere già in corso sin dai secoli precedenti, marcati dalla presenza di una pluralità di testimonianze letterarie che presentano un Pilato richiamato a Roma dal proprio imperatore per essere duramente punito, a motivo della sua maligna gestione della Passione e morte di Gesù.

E non si tratta più, semplicemente, di indirizzare rapporti a Tiberio, così come riferito da Tertulliano, Eusebio di Cesarea e Paolo Orosio. Ci troviamo ora ad assister, invece, ad una vera e propria convocazione di Ponzio Pilato a Roma, al fine di presentarsi innanzi al proprio imperiale superiore, ed essere oggetto di condanna per avere consegnato Gesù, il Figlio di Dio, ai giudei, dopo essersi lavato negligentemente le mani innanzi alla folla rumoreggiante.

Abbiamo già avuto modo di menzionare la "Paradosis Pilati" ("La consegna di Pilato"), un antico testo apocrifo redatto in lingua greca, nel quale Pilato è richiamato a Roma in catene:

«Quando il rapporto giunse a Roma e fu letto a Cesare, alla presenza di molte altre persone, tutti rimasero stupiti alle notizie concernenti la tenebra e il terremoto che avevano colpito la terra a causa del comportamento privo di ogni giustizia tenuto da Pilato. Cesare, ricolmo di rabbia, ordinò ai suoi soldati di condurre Pilato alla sua presenza, come prigioniero».

Nella "Paradosis", il prefetto romano è considerato colpevole della gestione superficiale e imbelle di una questione cruciale quale il giudizio del Figlio di un Dio:

«Quando Pilato fu condotto a Roma [... l'imperatore] gli ordinò di presentarsi al suo cospetto e gli chiese: 'Come osasti agire in tale modo, tu uomo empio, che avesti la possibilità di osservare con i tuoi stessi occhi i meravigliosi segni che accompagnavano quell'uomo? Con il tuo malvagio comportamento, tu hai provocato la devastazione del mondo intero. [...] Avresti dovuto proteggere Gesù dai giudei [...] perché era manifesto, grazie a quei segni, che Gesù era il Cristo, il re dei giudei».

L'imperatore scaglia poi ulteriori invettive contro l'ex-prefetto, e lo condanna infine alla pena capitale (Fig. 2):

«Poiché quest'uomo ha alzato la propria mano contro il giusto chiamato Cristo, allo stesso modo egli dovrà perire senza trovare alcuna salvezza».

Malgrado le accuse, in questo racconto è comunque pienamente presente la tradizione che descrive Pilato come un convertito al cristianesimo («Io stesso mi ero convinto, alla vista delle sue opere, che egli [Gesù] fosse il più grande tra gli dèi che noi veneriamo», dice egli all'imperatore); e, nel momento della sua decapitazione, un angelo raccoglie la sua testa recisa e la trasporta nei cieli, così come abbiamo avuto occasione di narrare in un precedente articolo.

E dunque, più ci inoltriamo nei secoli del Medioevo, più quella leggenda, che vede un Ponzio Pilato richiamato a Roma e punito per il ruolo rivestito nella Passione, si amplia e appare definirsi con maggiore intensità.

E, allo stesso tempo, ci avviciniamo ancor più al racconto narrato da Antoine de la Sale, molti secoli dopo, a proposito dei Laghi di Pilato e del massiccio del Monti Sibillini.

A cosa ci stiamo riferendo? Proseguiamo e vediamolo insieme.

Andremo ora a considerare la "Vindicta Salvatoris" ("La vendetta del Salvatore"), un testo medievale proveniente dai secoli dell'Alto Medioevo, del quale esistono varie versioni testuali, e che possiamo reperire in un antichissimo manoscritto: il Latin 5327, conservato presso la Bibliothèque Nationale de France, che giunge fino a noi dal decimo secolo.

La "Vindicta" illustra, introducendo una notevole confusione tra eventi e personaggi del tutto estranei tra di loro, una campagna militare effettuata contro la città di Gerusalemme da Vespasiano e, congiuntamente, da Tito, il quale, in questa narrazione, non è il ben noto figlio di quell'imperatore, ma piuttosto il signore di «Burdigala», l'odierna Bordeaux in Aquitania, città soggetta al dominio dell'imperatore Tiberio. La guerra è condotta proprio allo scopo di vendicare l'assassinio di Gesù Cristo, in modo che «essi sappiano che nessun altro dio è pari al nostro su tutta la superficie della terra» («ut cognoscant quia non est similis eius dominus super faciem terrae», nel testo originale latino al folium 56v - Fig. 3).

Dopo un assedio che dura sette anni, Gerusalemme viene infine conquistata e i suoi abitanti sono massacrati dai romani. Ed ecco riapparire il nostro povero prefetto, che pare essere ancora vivo e vegeto ai tempi dell'imperio di Vespasiano (folium 57v - Fig. 4):

«Pilato fu preso [...] e gettato in carcere a Damasco, sotto la custodia di quattro squadre di soldati ognuna composta da quattro militi, i quali facevano la guardia di fronte alla porta della prigione».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Et adprehenderunt Pilatum [...] et miserunt eum in Damasco in carcere et miserunt ei custodes quattuor quaternionum ante portam carceris»].

Successivamente, Tiberio invia il proprio rappresentante Velosiano da Roma alla Giudea, con il compito di condurre un'inchiesta in merito alla morte di Gesù. E, quando l'inviato dell'imperatore procede all'interrogatorio di Pilato, egli si rivolge al prefetto con le seguenti parole (folium 58v - Fig. 5): «'Perché uccidesti il Figlio di Dio?' Pilato rispose: 'Fu il suo stesso popolo a consegnarlo a me'. Velosiano allora disse: 'Tu per questo dovrai morire'» (nel testo originale latino: «'Quare interfecisti filium dei?' Pilatus autem dixit: 'Gens sua tradiderunt illum'. Velosianus autem dixit: 'Manifeste moriturus eris'»).

Infine, troviamo un riferimento al destino di Ponzio Pilato, così come sarà descritto più chiaramente in testi successivi: per ordine di Tiberio, Pilato, uomo maledetto («hunc hominem maledictum»), è gettato in una prigione chiamata 'Gehenna' («in Gehenne carcere»), tra i più atroci tormenti, segregato e sigillato per sempre, affinché egli non possa più mostrarsi sulla terra («in tormentorum et sub claude eum sub sigillo annulum et amplius non aperiat super terram») (folium 61r - Fig. 6). Vedremo in seguito come la 'Gehenna' non sia il luogo citato nell'Antico Testamento e nei Vangeli come destinazione finale per peccatori e malvagi, quanto piuttosto una corruzione del nome della città di Vienne, in Gallia: un luogo che gioca un ruolo fondamentale nella leggenda di Ponzio Pilato.

Dunque, in questa narrazione non è presente un racconto dell'esecuzione di Pilato; nondimeno, ancora una volta, nella tradizione medievale occidentale Ponzio Pilato è rappresentato come pienamente responsabile dell'uccisione di Gesù Cristo, senza la benché minima possibilità di essere considerato come un potenziale cristiano o addirittura un santo.

In aggiunta a tutto questo, è importante segnalare come, in questo testo, ci si vada a imbattere in elementi che già conosciamo. Troviamo infatti Pilato e Vespasiano: i medesimi personaggi menzionati da Antoine de la Sale nella propria opera quattrocentesca "Il Paradiso della Regina Sibilla" (Fig. 7):

«Si narra che quando Tito, figlio di Vespasiano, ebbe distrutto la città di Gerusalemme, cosa che alcuni affermano sia stata compiuta per vendicare la morte di Nostro Signore Gesù Cristo [...] quando egli ritornò a Roma, portò con sé Pilato, che a quel tempo era governatore presso la detta città di Gerusalemme».

[Nel testo originale francese: «se compte que quant titus de vespasien empereur de romme eut destruitte la cite de Jherusalem la quelle aucuns disent que ce fut pour la vengence de la mort Nostre Sieu Jhesuscrist [...] au retour que fist a romme, mena avecques soy pillate qui pour ce temps estoit officier en la ditte cite de Jherusalem»].

Gli indizi cominciano a collocarsi nella giusta posizione, gli elementi iniziano a connettersi gli uni con gli altri. Antoine de la Sale, accompagnato dai suoi villici, sta semplicemente riferendo quanto narrato da un racconto più antico, un esemplare del quale è la "Vindicta Salvatoris", in cui Ponzio Pilato si trova a vivere fianco a fianco con Vespasiano e Tito, i quali sono intenzionati a vendicare la morte di Gesù.

È questo l'unico indizio a condurci verso i Monti Sibillini, Antoine de la Sale e il leggendario racconto concernente Pilato e il suo lago?

No, affatto. Perché qualcosa di assolutamente rimarchevole accade anche in un altro testo che riferisce anch'esso della morte di Pilato.

Si tratta del "Rescriptum Tiberii", noto anche come "Lettera di Tiberio a Pilato", un testo greco che gli studiosi datano all'undicesimo secolo sulla base di considerazioni linguistiche (ne troviamo una versione nei folia 282v e 283r del manoscritto Grec 1771, conservato presso la Bibliothèque nationale de France - Fig. 8). La trascrizione dal greco è reperibile in “Apocrypha Anecdota” (Part II, pag. 78) a cura di M. R. James, mentre una traduzione in inglese è resa disponibile da Roger Pearse.

In questa lettera, asseritamente vergata da Tiberio e destinata a Pilato, dopo le usuali accuse pronunciate dall'imperatore nei confronti del prefetto, egli informa il governatore che «così come tu hai condannato ingiustamente quell'uomo e lo hai consegnato alla morte, anche io consegnerò te alla morte che meriti». E così Pilato, assieme ai capi dei giudei, tra i quali Archelao, fratello di Erode Antipa, e i sommi sacerdoti Anna e Caifa, sono presi e condotti a Roma. Pilato sarà «murato vivo in una certa grotta, e abbandonato lì».

E così Ponzio Pilato conclude la propria esistenza terrena sepolto vivo in un luogo sotterraneo (e, con un racconto assai strano, in questa narrazione egli sarà infine ucciso da una freccia vagante che riuscirà a penetrare nella grotta attraverso un piccolo varco, dopo essere stata scagliata dallo stesso Tiberio nel corso di una caccia al cervo). Si tratta di una prefigurazione dei laghi e delle cavità che nasconderanno il corpo del prefetto presso varie montagne in Francia, Svizzera e Italia.

Ma ciò che troviamo qui è ancora più interessante. Perché, secondo il "Rescriptum Tiberii", mentre Archelao è impalato e Anna viene rinchiuso all'interno di una pelle di bue e poi esposto al sole rovente, è Caifa che pare preannunciare il particolare destino che attenderà Ponzio Pilato nella tradizione successiva: durante il suo viaggio verso Roma, il sommo sacerdote morirà improvvisamente presso l'isola di Creta; e quando si tenterà di seppellire il suo corpo, la terra si rifiuterà di riceverlo, e lo rigetterà fuori.

Si tratta, nientedimeno, che del primo esempio di quel peculiare aspetto che marcherà per sempre i luoghi di sepoltura di Pilato: tempeste, così come descritte da Antoine de la Sale nel suo "Il Paradiso della Regina Sibilla", e grandini, e vapori, e una generale convulsione della terra che pare sprigionarsi violentemente dal profondo del suolo.

Una terra che non sembra essere affatto felice di ospitare il corpo di Pilato. Una delle membra di Satana.
















































































































31 May 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /14. The hands of the Fiend
Despite an early-Christian tendency to consider Pontius Pilate as a prospective convert to the new religion, with a view to putting the blame of Jesus' death on the Jews, there was someone who was working to meet a different target.

The reputation of the Christians had to be spoiled. And Pilate could help achieving this task.

At the beginning of the fourth century, forged versions of the reports written by Pilate to Tiberius on the Passion began to circulate. And the forgery was intended for the widest distribution amid the people (Fig. 1):

«The measures and the decrees of the cities against us, and copies of the imperial edicts appended to these, were engraved and erected on brazen tablets, a course never before adopted against us anywhere. The children also in the schools had the names of Jesus and Pilate, and the acts forged in derision, in their mouths the whole day. [...] Having therefore forged certain Acts of Pilate, respecting our Saviour, full of every kind of blasphemy against Christ, these, with the consent of the Emperor, they sent through the whole of the empire subject to him, commanding at the same time by ordinances in every place and city, and the adjacent districts, that they should be openly posted to the view of all persons, and that the schoolmasters should give them to their scholars to study and commit to memory, instead of their customary lessons».

The listed events are reported by Eusebius of Caesarea (“Historia Ecclesiae”, Book IX), who stresses the point that someone had fabricated a fake version of Pontius Pilate's reports, in an attempt to ridicule the new Christian faith and devotees. The forgery was badly concocted, as the same Eusebius notes (Book 1 - Fig. 2):

«From all this we can manifestly see the mischievous forgery of the reports [allegedly written by Pontius Pilate], that have been recently fabricated against our Lord Jesus Christ, and in which the very same information concerning the dates shows the falsehood thereof. For such reports falsely affirm that the passion of the Saviour happened during the fourth consulship of Tiberius, which occurred during the seventh year of his rule. This is a patent fake, because at that time Pilatus had not been sent to Judaea as a prefect yet».

According to Eusebius, the forgery had been commissioned by the highest political levels in Rome: the fake version of the 'Acta Pilati' were part of an anti-Christian policy pursued by Emperor Maximinus II, who ruled at the beginning of the fourth century.

In this ever-changing political framework, it is no surprise that the figure of Pilate, blurred and subject to conflicting thrusts which portrayed him as a near-Christian and an anti-Christian at the same time, was slowly moving towards a much less favourable representation.

Even though fourth-century bishop Eusebius of Caesarea, in his “Historia Ecclesiae” had depicted an amazed, bewildered Pontius Pilate reporting to his Emperor about the final hours in the life of Jesus, as if he were on the verge of a possible conversion to the new faith, that same Eusebius was the first to start raising doubts on a pacific ending of Pilate's unholy life (Book II, Chapter VII). We read his words from eleventh-century manuscript Grec 1431 preserved at the Bibliothèque Nationale de France (folia 33r and 33v), in which we highlighted the Greek words for 'Pilate' and 'with his own hand' (Fig. 3):

«Pilate himself, who was an unjust judge to the Saviour, is reported to have fallen into such misfortunes under Caius [Caligula] that he stabbed himself with his own hand, leaving his wicked life. Certainly he couldn't have escaped the divine vengeance».

For the first time, even for Christians Pilate is no prospective convert anymore. He begins to be considered as a wicked official, who is held responsible for what had happened to Jesus Christ, the Son of God. And divine punishment starts reaching him, in the most typical form of self-destruction, namely suicide.

It is at the end of the fourth century, with the Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed, adopted at the First Council of Constantinople in the year 381, that the early-Christian Church starts mentioning the name of Pontius Pilate in an official statement of belief. And certainly the mention does not appear to be as a fully positive quote, even though it does not put any manifest blame on the Roman prefect:

«[...] He [Jesus] was crucified for us under Pontius Pilate, and suffered, and was buried, and the third day he rose again [...]».

Nonetheless, the way is now paved for a new, darker representation of Pilate's controversial shadow.

In that same period, in Milan, Italy, an illustrious bishop, Aurelius Ambrosius, known today as St. Ambrose, wrote stern, disapproving words on Pilate in his “Expositio evangelii secundum Lucam” (“Commentary on the Gospel according to Luke”, Book X - Fig. 4):

«Sure Pilate washed his hands, but this did not diluted the facts; a judge must never give in to malevolence or fear, lest he barters innocent blood [...] He did not restrain from uttering an unholy sentence. So I reckon we find in him the type of all judges who condemn those whom they consider not guilty».

[In the original Latin text: «Lavit quidem manus Pilatus, sed facta non diluit; iudex enim nec invidiae cedere debuit nec timori, ut sanguinem innocentem addiceret. [...] nec sic a sacrilega sententia temperavit. Similiter in hoc typum omnium iudicum arbitror esse praemissum, qui damnaturi essent eos quos innoxios aestimarent»].

And even harsher words Ambrosius put down against Pilate in his “Enarrationes in XII Psalmos Davidicos” (“Explanations on twelve David's Psalms”, Psalm CXVIII, Sermo XX, 38 - Fig. 5):

«And Pilate said to Lord Jesus: 'I have power to crucify thee, and have power to release thee'. O man, you arrogate to yourself something you do not own. [...] Listen to what justice says: 'I shall not do nothing by myself'. [...] By your own voice, Pilate, you chain yourself, by your own sentence you condemn yourself. [...] Evil power is one which makes lawful what lawful is not. This is the power of darkness, a power that doesn't see the truth, and holds it in contempt».

[In the original Latin text: «Et Pilatus dicebat ad dominum Jesum: 'Potestatem habeo dimittendi te, et potestatem habeo crucifigendi te'. Usurpas, o homo, potestatem quam non habet. [...] Audi quid justitia dicat: 'Non possum a me facere quidquam'. [...] Tua, Pilate, voce constringeris, tua damnatis sententia. [...] Mala potestas licere quod non liceat. Potestas ista tenebrarum est, verum non videre, sed spernere»].

We are getting nearer and nearer to a fiendish representation of the fifth prefect of Roman-occupied Judaea: a wicked judge, whose hands are dripping with the blood of the Son of God, despite the ineffective washing he had publicly staged in an effort to shun his own responsibility and guilt.

A man of darkness. A man of evil. A man who just condemned himself. Out of his same sentence, out of his own nasty, ungodly behaviour.

But the final, decisive blow against Pontius Pilate will be struck by another prominent member of the Western Church, a Pope and a saint: Gregory I the Great.

In his “Quadraginta homiliarum de diversis lectionibus evangelii” (“Forty sermons on various passages from the Gospels”), dating to the final decade of the sixth century, St. Gregory delivers a sermon (XVI) on a passage taken from the Gospel of Matthew, in which Jesus is tempted by the devil. And this is the very point where he treads the ultimate barrier which separates Pilate from his final destination and doom.

For the first time ever, St. Gregory openly states the fiendish nature of Pontius Pilate (Fig. 6):

«Certainly the Fiend is the very head of all evil men: and all evil men are the limbs to this head. And wasn't Pilate a limb of the Devil?».

[In the original Latin text: «Certe iniquorum omnium caput diabolus est: et huius capitis membra sunt omnes iniqui. An non diaboli membrum fuit Pilatus?»].

And this ghastly correspondence is further stated in another work by Gregory the Great. In Book III, Cap. XII of the “Expositio moralis in beatum Job”, a commentary on the Book of Job, he writes the following sentence (Fig. 7):

«Limbs of the Fiend are those, which are joined to him in perverse life. No doubt Pilate is manifestly a limb of the Fiend: Pilate, who did not recognize the Lord who was offering himself for our salvation to the utmost sacrifice of death».

[In the original Latin text: «Sathanae membra sunt omnes, qui ei perverse vivendo iunguntur. Membrum quippe eius Pilatus extitit, qui usque ad mortis extrema venientem in redemptionem nostram dominum non cognovit»].

These are the words that will mark the Roman prefect for the centuries to come: Pontius Pilate, a limb of the unholy, loathsome body of Satan.

And this idea will play a fundamental part in our legends, known throughout the Middle Ages, concerning the many resting places of Pilate. Resting places which include the Sibillini Mountain Range, in Italy.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /14. Le mani del Nemico
Malgrado una peculiare tendenza rilevabile nel contesto della più antica Cristianità a considerare Ponzio Pilato come un potenziale credente, in progressivo avvicinamento alla nuova religione, anche allo scopo di potere caricare sul popolo ebraico la colpa immmane della morte di Gesù, c'era qualcuno che stava invece operando per raggiungere un obiettivo del tutto differente.

Occorreva infatti lordare la reputazione dei cristiani. E Pilato poteva ben servire allo scopo.

All'inizio del quarto secolo, furono poste in circolazione false versioni del rapporto che Pilato avrebbe indirizzato a Tiberio in merito alla Passione. E la falsificazione era destinata alla massima diffusione pubblica (Fig. 1):

«Le misure e i decreti che le città decisero contro di noi, assieme alle copie degli editti imperiali che li giustificavano, furono incisi su tavole di bronzo, con metodi che non erano mai stati adottati in precedenza contro di noi in nessun luogo. Inoltre, i ragazzini nelle scuole furono posti a conoscenza dei documenti contraffatti che riportavano i nomi di Gesù e Pilato, e li deridevano tutto il giorno. [...] Dopo avere falsificato alcuni rapporti di Pilato, concernenti il nostro Salvatore, e averli riempiti di ogni sorta di blasfemia contro Cristo, tali documenti, con il consenso dell'imperatore, furono inviati in tutto l'impero posto allora sotto il dominio di Roma, con l'ordine, emesso in ogni luogo e città, e in tutti i distretti limitrofi, che essi fossero pubblicamente esposti, in modo che tutti potessero leggerli; fu anche ordinato a tutti i precettori di distribuirli agli studenti, affinché fossero conosciuti e mandati a memoria, in luogo delle normali lezioni».

I fatti qui citati sono riferiti da Eusebio di Cesarea (“Historia Ecclesiae”, Libro IX), il quale intende evidenziare come qualcuno abbia inteso produrre una falsa versione dei rapporti di Pilato, nel tentativo di ridicolizzare e screditare la nuova religione cristiana e i suoi adepti. Quel falso, però, era stato male orchestrato, come ci racconta lo stesso Eusebio (Libro I - Fig. 2):

«Ma è del tutto palese l'evidenza della maligna falsificazione di quelle relazioni [asseritamente scritte da Ponzio Pilato], recentemente prodotte per calunniare Nostro Signore Gesù Cristo, e nelle quali sono le stesse date in esse riportate a manifestare la falsità dei documenti. Infatti questi rapporti affermano erroneamente che la Passione del Salvatore avrebbe avuto luogo durante il quarto consolato di Tiberio, che occorse nel settimo anno del suo imperio. Si tratta, però, di una evidente falsificazione, perché a quel tempo Pilato non era stato ancora inviato in Giudea in qualità di prefetto».

Secondo Eusebio, quel falso era stato commissionato presso il più elevato livello politico in Roma: la versione contraffatta degli 'Acta Pilati' erano parte di un'operazione politica anticristiana voluta dall'imperatore Massimino II, che esercitò il proprio dominio all'inizio del quarto secolo.

In un tale quadro di potere, in rapido mutamento, non sorprende affatto il rilevare come la figura di Pilato, confusamente percepita e soggetta a spinte contrastanti che tendevano a dipingerlo, allo stesso tempo, sia come un cristiano in potenza, sia come un oppositore di quella stessa fede, stesse progressivamente mutando in direzione di una rappresentazione assai meno favorevole.

E benché nella sua “Historia Ecclesiae” Eusebio di Cesarea, vescovo vissuto nel quarto secolo, abbia voluto raccontare di un Ponzio Pilato stupito e meravigliato alla vista degli eventi miracolosi occorsi durate gli ultimi momenti di vita di Gesù, riferendone in seguito all'imperatore come se egli si trovasse sull'orlo di una possibile conversione a quella nuova fede, fu proprio quello stesso Eusebio a sollevare i primi dubbi sull'effettiva possibilità di una pacifica conclusione della blasfema esistenza di Pilato (Libro II, Capitolo VII). Andiamo infatti a leggere le sue parole, tratte dal manoscritto Grec 1431 risalente all'undicesimo secolo e conservato presso la Bibliothèque Nationale de France (folia 33r and 33v), nel quale abbiamo evidenziato i termini greci per 'Pilato' e 'di propria mano' (Fig. 3):

«E si dice che lo stesso Pilato, che fu ingiusto giudice del Salvatore, sia caduto in tali sventure sotto l'imperio di Caio [Caligola] da finire con il pugnalarsi di propria mano, ponendo termine alla propria malvagia esistenza. Di certo, egli non avrebbe mai potuto sfuggire alla divina vendetta».

Per la prima volta, Pilato non viene più dipinto come un possibile convertito alla nuova religione. Egli comincia a essere considerato come un maligno funzionario, da ritenersi a tutti gli effetti responsabile di ciò che era accaduto a Gesù Cristo, il Figlio di Dio. E pare proprio che la punizione divina stia effettivamente iniziando a raggiungerlo, nella tipica e autodistruttiva forma del suicidio.

È alla fine del quarto secolo, con il Credo niceno-costantinopolitano, adottato nel corso del Primo Concilio di Costantinopoli nell'anno 381, che la Chiesa protocristiana inizia a menzionare il nome di Ponzio Pilato nel contesto di una formula di fede ufficiale. E, di certo, non si tratta affatto di una menzione favorevole, sebbene in essa non venga caricata alcuna colpa, quantomeno in modo esplicito, sul prefetto romano:

«[...] Fu crocifisso per noi sotto Ponzio Pilato, morì e fu sepolto. Il terzo giorno è risuscitato [...]».

Ormai, però, la strada verso una nuova, ben più oscura rappresentazione della controversa ombra di Pilato risulta essere totalmente aperta.

In quello stesso periodo, a Milano, in Italia, un illustre vescovo, Aurelio Ambrosio, conosciuto oggi come Sant'Ambrogio, scrisse parole di dura disapprovazione a proposito del comportamento di Pilato, parole contenute nella sua “Expositio evangelii secundum Lucam” (“Commento al Vangelo di Luca", Libro X - Fig. 4):

«Pilato può ben avere lavato le proprie mani, ma ciò non dissolve quanto da lui operato; nessun giudice è autorizzato a cedere all'odio o alla paura, vendendo così del sangue innocente [...] Egli non si ritrasse dal pronunciare una così empia sentenza. Credo che in lui possa essere riconosciuto quel genere di giudice che si spinge sino a condannare coloro che ritiene, invece, innocenti».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Lavit quidem manus Pilatus, sed facta non diluit; iudex enim nec invidiae cedere debuit nec timori, ut sanguinem innocentem addiceret. [...] nec sic a sacrilega sententia temperavit. Similiter in hoc typum omnium iudicum arbitror esse praemissum, qui damnaturi essent eos quos innoxios aestimarent»].

E parole ancora più dure nei confronti di Pilato vergò Ambrogio nelle sue “Enarrationes in XII Psalmos Davidicos” (“Illustrazioni dei dodici Salmi di David", Salmo CXVIII, Sermone XX, 38 - Fig. 5):

«E Pilato disse al Signore Gesù: 'ho il potere di metterti in libertà e il potere di metterti in croce'. O uomo, tu stai usurpando un potere del quale non disponi affatto. [...] Ascolta ciò che la giustizia afferma: 'Nulla potrò fare che scaturisca solamente da me stesso'. [...] Con le tue parole, Pilato, pronunciasti la tua stessa condanna. [...] Maligno è quel potere che osa ciò che non è consentito. È, questo, potere delle tenebre: il potere che non discerne il vero, ma anzi lo misconosce».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Et Pilatus dicebat ad dominum Jesum: 'Potestatem habeo dimittendi te, et potestatem habeo crucifigendi te'. Usurpas, o homo, potestatem quam non habet. [...] Audi quid justitia dicat: 'Non possum a me facere quidquam'. [...] Tua, Pilate, voce constringeris, tua damnatis sententia. [...] Mala potestas licere quod non liceat. Potestas ista tenebrarum est, verum non videre, sed spernere»].

Ci stiamo avvicinando sempre di più a una demoniaca rappresentazione della figura del quinto prefetto della Giudea occupata dai romani: un giudice malvagio, le cui mani sono intrise del sangue del Figlio di Dio, malgrado l'inutile lavacro da egli posto in scena nel vano tentativo di sfuggire alla propria responsabilità, e alla propria colpa.

Un uomo che appartiene alla tenebra. Un uomo che dimora nel male. Un uomo che condannò se medesimo. A causa della sentenza da lui stesso pronunciata; a causa del suo stesso empio, scellerato comportamento.

Ma il colpo decisivo contro Ponzio Pilato fu sferrato da un altro illustre membro della Chiesa occidentale, un Papa e un santo: Gregorio Magno.

Nelle sue “Quadraginta homiliarum de diversis lectionibus evangelii” (“Quaranta omelie su vari brani del Vangelo"), composte alla fine del sesto secolo, San Gregorio Magno redige un sermone (XVI) concernente uno specifico passaggio tratto dal Vangelo di Matteo, nel quale Gesù viene tentato dal demonio. Ed è proprio questo il punto nel quale egli attraversa l'ultima barriera, quella che separa Pilato dal proprio destino finale di perdizione.

Per la prima volta nella storia, Gregorio stabilisce apertamente la natura demoniaca di Ponzio Pilato (Fig. 6):

«Certamente il Nemico è la testa di tutti gli uomini malvagi: e, di quella testa, tutti gli uomini iniqui costituiscono le membra. Non fu forse Pilato una delle membra del Demonio?».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Certe iniquorum omnium caput diabolus est: et huius capitis membra sunt omnes iniqui. An non diaboli membrum fuit Pilatus?»].

E questa terrificante similitudine è ulteriormente ribadita all'interno di un'altra opera scritta da Gregorio Magno. Nel Libro III, Cap. XII della sua “Expositio moralis in beatum Job”, un commento al Libro di Giobbe, egli così scrive (Fig. 7):

«Membra di Satana sono tutti quegli uomini i quali, vivendo perversamente, a lui si congiungono. Non vi è dubbio che Pilato abbia costituito una delle sue membra, perché nemmeno nell'estremo istante della crocifissione egli riconobbe il Signore, che si offriva per la nostra redenzione».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Sathanae membra sunt omnes, qui ei perverse vivendo iunguntur. Membrum quippe eius Pilatus extitit, qui usque ad mortis extrema venientem in redemptionem nostram dominum non cognovit»].

Sono queste le parole che apporranno un marchio indelebile sul prefetto romano per i secoli a venire: Ponzio Pilato, una delle membra dell'empio, osceno corpo di Satana.

E questa idea giocherà un ruolo fondamentale nelle leggende, conosciute attraverso tutto il Medioevo, che avranno al proprio centro i molti luoghi di sepoltura di Pilato. Luoghi di sepoltura che comprenderanno, anche, i Monti Sibillini in Italia.



























































































































26 May 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /13. The fate of Pentheus
In our previous article, we described the journey across the centuries of an ancient tradition that portrays Pilatus, the prefect of Judaea who sentenced Jesus Christ to death, as a latent Christian, if not a full convert, and then a testimony to the Resurrection, a prophet and finally a saint.

This peculiar outcome, which can be traced across time up to present sanctity formally recognised by an eastern Ortodox church, can be faintly detected in western worship as well. However, in this case it is but a feeble remnant of the antique tradition we have already depicted.

In Western Europe (Fig. 1), a similar hint to Pilate's innocence is found in the “Letter of Pilatus to Emperor Tiberius”, an apocryphal text written in Latin, possibly dating to as late as early Renaissance. It is reported by Barthélemy de Chasseneuz in his “Catalogus gloriae mundi, laudes, honores, excellentias” published in Lyon in 1546 (Fig. 2):

«I did not strive to the utmost of my power to prevent the loss and suffering of righteous blood, guiltless of every accusation. It was an injustice due to the malice of men».

[In the original Latin text: «pro viribus non restiterim, sanguinem iustum totius accusationis immunem, verum hominum malignitate inique»].

Another example can be retrieved in a text we already mentioned earlier in this series of articles: St. Jerome's “Commentary on Matthew” edited by Erasmus of Rotterdam and published in 1537, a work that contains the following interpolation by Erasmus:

«Pilate gave multiple opportunities for freeing the Savior: first by offering a thief for a just man; then by adding: "What then shall I do about Jesus who is called Christ? [...] what evil has he done?" In saying this, Pilate absolved Jesus. [...] Thus, in the washing of his hands, the works of the Gentiles are cleansed, and in some manner he estranges us from the impiety of the Jews».

[In the original Latin text: «Multas liberandi salvatoris Pilatus occasiones dedit. Primum latrone iusto conferens. Deinde inferens: Quid igitur faciam de Iesu qui dicitur Christus [...] Quid eum mali fecit. Hoc dicendo Pilatus absolvit Iesum. [...] Ut in lavacro manuum eius, gentilium opera purgarentur, et ab impietate Iudaeorum»].

However, the listed examples have more to do with a widespread racist sentiment held within the Christian community than the absolution of Pontius Pilate's guilts.

In Western Europe, Pilate has never become a saint.

Since early Christianity, the Church of Rome had to deal with the opinion expressed by a pagan enemy of old, the Greek philosopher Celsus. As early as the second-century, he attacked the new expanding religion with his treatise “On The True Doctrine”, in which, according to the extant excerpts that can be retrieved in Origen's response “Against Celsum” (Book II, Chapter 34), he highlighted Pontius Pilate's manifest culpability in the case Jesus had truly been a divine being, which he definitely did not believe (Fig. 3):

«The person [Pilate] that condemned Him didn't endure any punishment, comparable to that of Pentheus, who was deprived of his senses and torn to pieces».

So, since the very beginning of the whole story, it was a pagan author who hit the nail of the head: if Jesus Christ had really been the Son of a God, Pontius Pilate's guilt would simply be immense, the same guilt which lay with Pentheus, the King of Thebes who opposed Dionysus and pushed himself as fas as to imprison a deity, according to the tale told by Euripides in his tragic play “The Bacchae”.

He was slain and dismembered by the members of his own family.

Why hadn't Pontius Pilate undergone the same ghastly, harrowing doom?

Despite his feeble attempts at setting Jesus free, his subsequent alleged conversion, his putting the blame on Jews, his prospective sanctity, and his unnatural placement within an Orthodox calendar of saints, the Roman prefect of Judaea would not escape his own predestined fate (Fig. 4).

His destiny was already written. And we will see, as the centuries rolled along, that his doom was inevitable. It was just a matter of time.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /13. Il destino di Penteo
Nel nostro precedente articolo, abbiamo descritto il viaggio attraverso i secoli di un'antica tradizione che rappresenta Pilato, il prefetto della Giudea che condannò Gesù Cristo alla morte per crocifissione, come un cristiano in pectore, se non addirittura come un vero e proprio credente, e quindi come un testimone della Resurrezione, un profeta e, infine, come un santo venerato.

Questo peculiare esito, il cui percorso può essere tracciato nel tempo sino alla moderna canonizzazione ancora oggi formalmente riconosciuta da una chiesa ortodossa orientale, può essere più debolmente rilevata anche nella tradizione religiosa occidentale. Ma, in questo caso, non si tratta che di un flebile ricordo di quella antica tradizione che abbiamo già avuto occasione di ripercorrere.

Nell'Europa occidentale (Fig. 1), un accenno analogo all'innocenza di Pilato è rinvenibile nella "Lettera di Pilato all'imperatore Tiberio', un testo apocrifo redatto in latino, assai più tardo rispetto agli apocrifi già da noi considerati, e risalente forse al primo Rinascimento. Il testo è rinvenibile nel “Catalogus gloriae mundi, laudes, honores, excellentias” di Barthélemy de Chasseneuz, pubblicato a Lione nel 1546 (Fig. 2):

«Non ho saputo lottare con tutte le mie forze per proteggere quel sangue giusto da tutte le accuse, ingiustamente sollevate contro di lui dalla malvagità degli uomini».

[Nel testo originale latino: «pro viribus non restiterim, sanguinem iustum totius accusationis immunem, verum hominum malignitate inique»].

E un altro esempio è contenuto in un testo che avevamo già avuto modo di citare in precedenza in questa stessa serie di articoli: i "Commenti al Vangelo di Matteo" di San Gerolamo, opera edita da Erasmo da Rotterdam e pubblicata nel 1537, che contiene la seguente interpolazione aggiunta da Erasmo:

«Pilato offrì molte opportunità per la liberazione del Salvatore: in primo luogo, offrendo un ladrone al posto di un giusto; poi, aggiungendo: 'Cosa dovrei fare di questo Gesù che è chiamato il Cristo [...] Quale male avrebbe egli compiuto?' Così dicendo, Pilato volle assolvere Gesù. [...] E così, lavando le proprie mani, purificò l'operato i Gentili da ogni colpa, separandoci così dalla scellerate azioni dei giudei».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Multas liberandi salvatoris Pilatus occasiones dedit. Primum latrone iusto conferens. Deinde inferens: Quid igitur faciam de Iesu qui dicitur Christus [...] Quid eum mali fecit. Hoc dicendo Pilatus absolvit Iesum. [...] Ut in lavacro manuum eius, gentilium opera purgarentur, et ab impietate Iudaeorum [...] nos alienos faceret»].

Malgrado tutto ciò, gli esempi qui citati hanno probabilmente più a che fare con un diffuso sentimento antisemita, largamente presente all'interno della comunità cristiana, che non con una assoluzione delle colpe di Ponzio Pilato.

Nell'Europa occidentale, Pilato non è mai divenuto un santo.

Sin dai primi secoli della Cristianità, la Chiesa di Roma dovette confrontarsi con l'opinione espressa da un vecchio nemico di fede pagana, il filosofo greco Celso. Già nel secondo secolo, egli si era opposto alla diffusione della nuova religione con il suo trattato "La vera dottrina", nel quale, in base ai frammenti sopravvissuti grazie alle citazioni tramandateci da Origene nella sua risposta "Contro Celso" (Libro II, Capitolo 34), l'oppositore dei cristiani poneva in evidenza la palese colpevolezza di Ponzio Pilato, e proprio nel caso in cui Gesù fosse risultato essere veramente di origine divina, cosa che egli intendeva negare (Fig. 3):

«L'uomo [Pilato] che Lo condannò non ricevette alcuna punizione, che sia paragonabile a quella subìta da Penteo, il quale fu privato della ragione, e il suo corpo smembrato».

E così, sin dall'inizio di tutta questa vicenda, fu proprio un autore pagano a porre il dito nella piaga: se Gesù Cristo fosse stato realmente il Figlio di un Dio, la colpa di Ponzio Pilato sarebbe, puramente e semplicemente, incommensurabile: la stessa colpa della quale si sarebbe caricato Penteo, il re di Tebe che aveva osato opporsi a Dioniso e si era spinto sino a far gettare in prigione quell'essere divino, così come narrato da Euripide nella sua tragedia "Le Baccanti".

Egli fu trucidato e dilaniato dai membri della sua stessa famiglia.

Perché Ponzio Pilato non era stato sottoposto al medesimo orribile, straziante destino?

Malgrado i tentativi debolmente posti in atto per evitare la condanna di Gesù, malgrado la sua asserita seppure tarda conversione, nonostante i suoi sforzi di caricare la colpa sul popolo ebraico, la sua eventuale santità, e la sua innaturale presenza all'interno di un elenco di santi ortodossi, il prefetto romano della Giudea non sarebbe sfuggito a lungo al proprio ineludibile fato (Fig. 4).

Il suo destino era già scritto. E vedremo, mentre i secoli continuavano a scorrere, come questo destino non abbia potuto, infine, che colpirlo, e in modo inesorabile. Si trattava, solamente, di una questione di tempo.





























































24 May 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /12. A governor and a saint
July, 2nd, save the date. In fact this is a very important day for Christians, as the Holy Roman Church celebrates many respectable saints, though totally undistinguished, like St. Processus and Martinianus, Virgin Saint Monegundes, St. Swithun and many other holy people listed in the “Martyrologium Romanum”.

However, on that very same day the ancient Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church, one of the largest Eastern Orthodox Churches and one of the most antique Christian confessions, keeps memory of a saint who is far more renowned.

It is St. Pontius Pilate.

In a contemporary edition of the “Ethiopian Synaxarion”, the Book of Saints of the Ethiopian Church, under the twenty-fifth day of the month of Säne (corresponding to our July, 2nd), we find in the listing the following holy man (Fig. 1):

«On this day also died Pilate, the confessor. Salutation to Pilate who washed his hands of the Blood of Jesus Christ. [...] Glory be to God Who is glorified in His Saints. Amen».

This sentence is drawn from sources that are far more ancient, which include manuscripts written in the Ethiopian language and dating to the sixteenth and eighteenth century, as reported by the great Italian scholar Ignazio Guidi in his work “Le Sinaxaire Éthiopien”, published in 1907 (in which the twenty-fifth day of the month of Säne is said to correspond to our June, 19th - Fig. 2).

Thus, a very ancient tradition, pertaining to the Eastern devotees, has been considering Pontius Pilatus as a saint. For centuries and centuries. And it is still considered so, as shown by the contemporary “Synaxarion”.

This odd, unexpected status - for the devotees of the Holy Roman Church - is the outcome of a long process, which began with the Gospels and proceeded through apocryphal texts such as the “Epistola Pilati”, the “Gesta Pilati”, the “Anaphora Pilati” and the “Paradosis Pilati”, supported in its course by early-Christian authors including Tertullianus, Eusebius of Caesarea, Paulus Orosius, Origen of Alexandria: all of them presenting Pilate as basically «innocent of the blood of this just person» (Matthew 27:24), that is of the blood of Jesus.

Because, according to this old tradition, Pontius Pilate, at the end of the story, began to believe in Jesus, after he had witnessed to the miracles that had taken place before and after His death. The prefect became a Christian, the governor turned into a prohet. The Roman ruler had glorified the mighty of God at last, and so he had become a saint.

All that started to happen since the very beginning of Christianity and despite the numerous existing literary statements concerning Pilate's cowardness, ruthlessness, wickedness and basical mediocrity, as attested by the classical tradition (Philo of Alexandria, Flavius Josephus) and even the Gospels themselves.

For the blame for Jesus' death wasn't to be put on Pontius Pilate.

Instead, according to this ancient tradition, the true murderers of a God were the Jews: «see ye to it», as Pilate himself had told them (Matthew 27:24).

Why did the early-Christian community decide that this exorbitant guilt should lie entirely on the Jewish nation?

Even though it is outside the scope of the present paper to address the miserable history of Anti-Semitism, reasons appear to be manifold. Many scholars think that, in a very early phase of Christianity, wouldn't have been safe for the new religion to charge so great an accusation on a high-rank Roman citizen, a prominent official who was a direct report to the Emperor in Rome. Too powerful and dangerous was the Roman Empire to challenge it in such a straightforward way. On the other side, the Jews made up a feasible target, weak as they were in terms of both political and military strength. They also represented a competitor for the rising Christianity, an obstacle to the acquisition of new devotees in the very region were Jesus had lived and preached.

Anti-Semitism was just raising its awful head, and would ravage across the whole of Europe in the centuries and millennia to come. To further illustrate this gloomy context, we can also quote from another fourth-century theologian, St. Ephrem the Syrian, especially celebrated in the Eastern Orthodox Church, who was the author of many poetic hymns in Syriac who mentioned both Pilate and the Jews. In the hymn “On the Crucifixion” he wrote the following lines on Pilate as a righteous man:

«Thee also, O Title, that just man wrote - One of the Gentiles, on behalf of all the Gentiles - [...] Prophets for the Son from among the gentiles - [...] Prophecy cried out from among the Gentiles».

And in another hymn, “On Virginity”, he wrote that «[Pilate] who upon his tribunal washed his hands - [...] wast cleansed and purified - by [...] waters of innocent dreams - The Nations shone fourth, purified and cleansed - but the [Jewish] Nation became black, defiled by that blood» (Fig. 3).

Therefore, the whitewashing of the memory of Pontius Pilate fitted the objectives of a developing Christianity: Jesus Christ had been killed by the Jews, while the Roman prefect, as a result of a suitable cleanup, was turned into a righteous devotee and prophet. And the cleanup of his figure would have gone as far as full sanctity.

At least, in the eastern Christian tradition.

St. Pilate is worshipped by an Ortodox Church, the Ethiopian. Many of the apocryphal texts which introduce an almost Christian Pontius Pilate are written in Greek, and are intended for an eastern audience.

On the other side, the Holy Roman Church, in the western area of Europe, does not worship Pontius Pilate in the least. And it never did.

Because something very different has happened, across the centuries, in the western tradition. Pilate was not considered as a positive figure at all.

We will now start a brand new course spanning through the Middle Ages in Western Europe. A course of no sanctity and no holiness. A gloomy, sinister course.

And it is a course that will bring us, after many windings, up to the legends of the Lakes of Pilatus (Fig. 4). In the very middle of the Italian Sibillini Mountain Range.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /12. Governatore e santo
Due luglio, segnate questa data sul vostro calendario. Si tratta, infatti, di una giornata molto importante per i cristiani, in quanto la Santa Romana Chiesa celebra numerosi santi assai rispettabili, benché del tutto sconosciuti, come ad esempio i santi Processo e Martiniano, la santa vergine Monegonda, san Swithun e ulteriori, molteplici santi elencati nel “Martyrologium Romanum”.

Eppure, proprio in quello stesso giorno, la bimillenaria Chiesa Ortodossa Etiope Tewahedo, una delle più grandi chiese ortodosse orientali, nonché una delle più antiche confessioni cristiane, celebra la memoria di un santo il cui nome risulta essere ben più conosciuto.

Si tratta di San Ponzio Pilato.

In una edizione contemporanea del "Synaxarion Etiopico", il Libro dei Santi della Chiesa Etiope, al venticinquesimo giorno del mese di Säne (corrispondente al nostro due luglio), troviamo elencato il seguente sant'uomo (Fig. 1):

«Fu questo il giorno in cui morì Pilato, il credente. Sia celebrato Pilato, che lavò le proprie mani del Sangue di Gesù Cristo. [...] Sia resa gloria a Dio che è glorificato nei Suoi santi. Amen».

Questa frase è tratta da fonti più antiche, che comprendono manoscritti redatti in lingua etiope e databili tra il sedicesimo e il diciottesimo secolo, così come riportato dal grande studioso italiano Ignazio Guidi nella sua opera "Le Sinaxaire Éthiopien", pubblicata nel 1907 (in cui il venticinquesimo giorno del mese di Säne è posto in relazione con il nostro diciannove giugno - Fig. 2).

Dunque, un'antichissima tradizione, viva soprattutto tra le comunità di fedeli orientali, ha considerato Ponzio Pilato come un santo. Per secoli e secoli. E, ai nostri giorni, egli è ancora considerato come tale, così come riportato nel "Synaxarion" contemporaneo.

Questo status, così strano e inatteso - per i credenti appartenenti alla Chiesa di Roma - è il risultato di un lungo processo, che ha avuto inizio già con i Vangeli ed è proseguito attraverso testi apocrifi quali l'“Epistola Pilati”, le “Gesta Pilati”, l'“Anaphora Pilati” e la “Paradosis Pilati”, sostenuto inoltre nella propria rotta plurisecolare da autori protocristiani come Tertulliano, Eusebio di Cesarea, Paolo Orosio, Origene di Alessandria: tutti, nelle loro opere, si spingono, seppure in modi diversi, fino a descrivere Pilato come «non [...] responsabile [...] di questo sangue» (Matteo 27:24), il sangue di Gesù.

Perché, secondo questa antica tradizione, Ponzio Pilato, a ben vedere, avrebbe iniziato a credere nel Cristo, dopo essere stato testimone diretto dei miracoli che avevano avuto luogo prima e dopo la Sua morte. Quel prefetto, quindi, divenne cristiano; quel governatore si mutò in profeta. Egli aveva finito per glorificare la magnificenza di Dio, ed era stato così tramutato in un santo.

Tutto ciò ha cominciato a verificarsi già a partire dal momento in cui la Cristianità ha iniziato a muovere i primi passi, e senza considerare affatto le numerose attestazioni letterarie concernenti la codardia, la spietata malvagità e la fondamentale mediocrità attribuite a Pilato, così come descritte dalla tradizione classica (Filone di Alessandria, Flavio Giuseppe) e come anche appare negli stessi Vangeli.

Perché la colpa della morte di Gesù non doveva essere affatto posta a carico di Ponzio Pilato.

Secondo questa antica tradizione, infatti, gli assassini di un Dio non erano altri che gli ebrei: «vedetevela voi», come lo stesso Pilato aveva detto loro (Matteo 27:24).

Ma perché la nuova comunità dei Cristiani si trovò a decidere che una tale esorbitante colpa fosse caricata interamente sul popolo ebraico?

Benché sia al di fuori degli obiettivi di questa serie di articoli il tentare di ripercorrere la miserabile storia dell'antisemitismo, le ragioni sembrerebbero essere diverse. Molti studiosi pensano che, in una fase assai iniziale dello sviluppo del Cristianesimo, non sarebbe stato saggio, per la nuova religione, invocare un'accusa così grande nei confronti di un cittadino romano di rango così elevato, un importante amministratore che riferiva direttamente all'imperatore di Roma. Troppo potente, troppo pericoloso era l'impero romano per poterlo sfidare in modo così diretto. Dall'altro lato, gli ebrei rappresentavano un bersaglio assai facile, trattandosi di un gruppo politicamente e militarmente privo di particolare consistenza. Inoltre, essi costituivano un diretto concorrente per la nascente Cristianità, un ostacolo che andava a frapporsi tra la nuova predicazione e l'acquisizione di nuovi adepti, tra l'altro nella regione stessa in cui Gesù aveva vissuto e predicato.

L'antisemitismo, dunque, stava cominciando a mostrare al mondo il proprio terribile volto, e avrebbe in effetti devastato l'Europa intera nei secoli e millenni a venire. Al fine di illustrare ulteriormente questa oscura corrente di pensiero, è possibile citare un brano, risalente al quarto secolo, vergato da un altro teologo cristiano, Sant'Efrem il Siro, celebrato in modo particolare dalle chiese ortodosse orientali. Egli fu l'autore di numerosi inni poetici in lingua siriaca, nei quali vengono menzionati sia Pilato che i giudei. Nell'inno "Della Crocifissione", egli scrisse i seguenti versi, nei quali l'autore non si esime dal descrivere Pilato come un giusto tra gli uomini:

«E tu, o Titolo della Croce, che fosti scritto da un giusto - Uno dei Pagani, per conto di tutti i Pagani - [...] Profeti per il Figlio originatisi tra i Pagani - [...] La Profezia si è innalzata tra i Pagani».

E in un altro inno, "Della Verginità", egli così scrisse: «[Pilato] che innanzi al suo tribunale lavò le proprie mani - [...] fu mondato e purificato - con acque di pensieri innocenti - Le Nazioni splendettero, mondate e purificate - ma la Nazione [ebraica] divenne nera, lordata da quel sangue» (Fig. 3).

È chiaro come il lavacro al quale fu sottoposta la memoria di Ponzio Pilato non facesse che assecondare gli obiettivi di una Cristianità in fase di grande sviluppo: Gesù Cristo era stato ucciso dai giudei, mentre il prefetto romano, in conseguenza di un'opportuna depurazione, si trasformava in un giusto, un fedele credente e un profeta. E questo processo di purificazione si sarebbe spinto fino a giungere alla piena santità del personaggio.

Quantomeno, nella tradizione cristiana orientale.

San Pilato, infatti, può ben essere venerato da una chiesa ortodossa, quella etiope. E, in effetti, molti dei testi apocrifi che descrivono Ponzio Pilato come un potenziale cristiano sono redatti in lingua greca, e sono destinati a un pubblico orientale.

Ma, dall'altro lato, la Santa Romana Chiesa, nei territori occidentali d'Europa, quel Ponzio Pilato non lo venera affatto. Né lo ha mai venerato.

Perché, attraverso i secoli, nella tradizione occidentale, ha avuto luogo qualcosa di assolutamente differente. Pilato non è stato mai considerato come un personaggio positivo. In alcun modo.

Stiamo ora per cominciare un nuovo viaggio attraverso il Medioevo dell'Europa occidentale. Un viaggio che non prevede né santi, né profeti. Un viaggio che sarà, invece, oscuro e sinistro.

Si tratta di un viaggio che ci porterà, dopo molte deviazioni, direttamente in direzione delle leggende dei Laghi di Pilato (Fig. 4). Proprio in Italia, nel bel mezzo del massiccio dei Monti Sibillini.
























































































20 May 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /11. The hunt for the official report
When Jesus Christ underwent his harrowing Passion, Pontius Pilate was holding a high-rank post in Judaea as prefect of the province occupied by the Romans. According to Flavius Josephus, he had been appointed by Emperor Tiberius Caesar (“The Jewish War”, Book II, 169), and to Tiberius, who was still in full power when the Passion occurred, he was bound to report all the events that had happened in that remote and rioutous fragment of the Roman Empire.

Did Pilate ever write an official report on the Passion?

And if he did, where is that report?

The question has absorbed the attention of early Christianity for centuries. An official report written by Pontius Pilate and addressed to his Emperor would be the ultimate evidence, generated by an independent, reliable source, of the actual truth of the Passion, and possibly of the Resurrection, too. A sort of smoking gun: a special one, as it would be the proof of the Incarnation of a God on earth (Fig. 1).

Has such a fateful piece of papyrus or parchment ever existed?

Justin Martyr, a Christian apologist who lived in the second century, was convinced that it was just the case: in Chapters XXXV and XLVIII of his “First Apology”, addressed to Emperor Antoninus Pius, he notes that «you can read all about that [the Passion of Jesus] in the official reports which were written by Pontius Pilate», and «the reports written by Pilate provide you with the proof of those events».

We already saw that Tertullianus, in his second-century “Apologeticus” (Chapter XXI, 24), wrote that «all these things with reference to Christ, Pilate [...] reported to the then emperor Tiberius» (in the original Latin text: «ea omnia super Christo Pilatus [...] Caesari tunc Tiberio nuntiavit»). And in the fourth century Eusebius of Caesarea, in his “ Historia Ecclesiae” (Book II, Chapter II, 1-3), reiterated this same belief: «Pontius Pilate informed Tiberius of the reports [...] concerning the resurrection of our Saviour Jesus from the dead» (in the Latin translation from the original Greek text: «De resurrectionem a mortuis domini et salvatoris nostri Iesu Christi [...] Pilatus Tiberio principi refert»).

If Pontius Pilate's report has ever been written in actual reality, the original item has long gone lost amid the mists of the millennia.

Yet, something has survived. A report written by the Roman prefect who played a major part in Jesus' death. Actually, more than one report: there are many of them.

Let's start from the oldest one: an ancient tradition has handed down to us a letter that Pilate would allegedly have written to Emperor Claudius, one of the successors of Tiberius. Some scholars date it to the end of the second century, and surely it is the most ancient representative of the Christian apocryphal tradition concerning Pontius Pilate.

This text is often found as a section of the “Gospel of Nicodemus”, an apocryphal work including different narratives, as it appears for instance in manuscript Vat Lat 4363 preserved at the Vatican Apostolic Library. Of course, the letter, which allegedly contains the original, much sought-after official report on the Passion that Pontius Pilate, in his capacity as prefect of Judaea, wrote to highest authority in Rome, has possibly nothing to do with any official writing ever written by the actual hand of the Roman prefect. However, this is an antique instance of the opinion that early Christians held on Pilate. Let's read the letter's content from the antique manuscript Latin 1871 (Bibliothèque Nationale de France, folium 1), dating to the tenth century (Fig. 2):

«Pontius Pilate to Claudius, greetings. There happened recently something in which I myself was personally involved...»

[In the original Latin text: «Pontius Pilatus Claudio salutem. Nuper accidit, et quod ipse probavi...»].

This is the opening of the letter. In a few lines, Pilate retraces the events that occurred before his very eyes on that fateful Friday: the Jews delivering Jesus to him, the account of the many miracles performed by the indicted man, the accusations, the sentence and crucifixion. Then, three days after, an unexpected resurrection («die tertio surrexit»), with the soldier on watch attesting that he had actually done so («nam et illum surrexisse testati sunt se vidisse») (Fig. 3). He closes his letter by openly accusing the Jews:

«I have reported this lest anyone should lie about it and lest you should think that the lies of the Jews should be believed».

[In the original Latin text: «Haec ideo ingressi ne quis aliter mentiatur, et aestimes credendum mendaciis Iudaeorum»].

Sure enough, this is not a letter that a prefect in charge for a Roman province might have ever written to the attention of his boss in Rome, full as it is of irrelevant information when read by a ruling Emperor, and manifestly concocted by an early-Christian hand so as to present itself as a proof of the Resurrection stated by an independent non-Christian witness, with the addition of clear anti-Jewish material.

But what is specifically of interest to us here is that, in this first available instance of a report, Pilate is not represented as a potential Christian yet.

However, the transformation of a heathen, Pontius Pilate, into an amazed witness to the Resurrection and eventually a convinced Christian is now underway.

Let's consider again the “Gospel of Nicodemus”, an apocryphal text which includes unrelated narratives traditionally labelled with the said inconsistent title: the first section, quite long, is known as “Gesta Pilati” or “Acta Pilati” (“Pilate's Deeds” or “Pilate's Report”), or even as “Gesta Salvatoris” (“The Deeds of the Saviour”): an apocryphal work whose origin is dated by scholars somewhere between the fourth and fifth century, with continual textual editing being performed throughout the subsequent centuries, owing to the great fortune experienced by the text across the Middle Ages, with hundreds and hundreds of surviving manuscripts written in various languages, including Greek, Latin, Aramaic, Armenian, Coptic, and others. In this article, we will display images taken from Codex 326 (1076), a most ancient manuscript dating back to the ninth century preserved at the Stiftsbibliothek of Einsiedeln Abbey, Switzerland (Fig. 4).

In the “Gesta Pilati”, the positive tradition concerning the Roman prefect of Judaea develops even further, evolving into a representation of the Passion which is certainly more favourable to Pilate than that portrayed in the canonical Gospels. A Pilate who is remarkably near to a full conversion to the new Christian faith.

In this apocryphal writing, Pilate is amazed and moved at the sight of the stunning miracles that surrounds Jesus, to whom even the flags carried by the standard bearers at the prefect's palace bend as if they were honouring Him (folium 12r). Urged by the Jews, but finding no guilt in Jesus, he reacts angrily against them («Pilatus furore repletus», folium 13r). When they ask him to cruficy Jesus, he openly replies «This is no fair request» («Non est bonum», folium 14r) (Fig. 5).

It is clear that, in the “Gesta Pilati”, the Roman governor does not want to condemn Him, so much so that he hopelessly appeals to the raging crowd: «[I see that] not all the people gathered here wants Him to die» («non omnis multitudo vult eum mori», folium 14r). But the chief priests and elders of the Jews have no intention to give up. And when Nicodemus the Pharisee speaks in favour of Jesus, the following interesting remarks are pronounced (folium 14v - Fig. 6):

«The Jews told Nicodemus: 'You certainly have turned into one of His followers, considering that you so openly speak in his favour'. But Nicodemus replied: 'Perhaps you think that the governor, too, is now among His followers, owing to his words in Jesus' favour?'».

[In the original Latin text: «Dicunt iudaei nichodemo: tu discipulus eius factus es et verbum pro ipso facis. Dicit ad eso nichodemus: numquid et praeses discipulus eius factus est et verbum pro ipso facit?»].

The chasm between a prefect of Rome and a Christian believer is getting narrower and narrower: the “Gesta Pilati” clearly suggests that Pontius Pilate is more than a local administrators, as Jesus may have proceeded deeply in his heart. We are bordering Pilate's full conversion to Christianity.

The accounts on Jesus's sanctity continue to flow in from the crowd. Pilate listens to several tales of miracolous deeds, he is fully convinced of his innocence, he utters harsh words against the pressing Jews. When at last Jesus dies on the Cross, and the sun disappears casting darkness over the whole land, the veil of the temple rent in twain from the top to the bottom, Pilate seems to fully believe, finally, in the holiness of the sentenced man (folium 16v - Fig. 7):

«Pilate convened the Jews and said: 'Did you see what happened?' But they so replied to the governor: 'Just a solar eclipse as often happens'».

[In the original Latin text: «Convocans autem pilatus iudaeos dicit eis: vidistis quae facta sunt? responderunt praesidi: Eclipsis factum est solis secundum consuetudinem»].

Pontius Pilate is slowly walking his centuries-long road, gradually turning into an early, very early Christian.

There is a further hint to that ongoing conversion process in the “Anaphora Pilati” (“Pilate's Report”), a Greek text which allegedly contains, once more, the official report on the Passion written by Pontius Pilate and addressd to Emperor Tiberius in Rome. Of course, the “Anaphora” is nothing more than a traditional text which was put on parchment centuries after Pilate's death. Again, this text has no relation at all with a possible original written by Pilate himself in the first century; however the “Anaphora Pilati” offers another Christian-oriented interpretation of the content of the prefect's report, with a view to providing a convincing testimony to the Resurrection. Here is the Greek text as it appears in manuscript Grec 770 preserved at the Bibliothèque Nationale de France (folium 25r - Fig. 8):

«To the most mightly, venerable, most divine, and most terrible, August Caesar, Pilate the governor of the East. I have, O most mighty, a narrative to give thee, on account of which I am seized with fear and trembling. For in the territory under my government, being one city named Jerusalem, the Jews delivered to me a man called Jesus...».

After this grandiloquent opening, in a few pages Pilate recounts the events of that extraordinary Friday in Jerusalem. The Roman prefect voices all his amazement at the preternatural wonders which occurred after the death of Jesus:

«A great darkness took hold of all the world, because the sun was darkened, and the stars appeared but they did not shine; and the light of the moon appeared as blood [...] and there were great thunders [...] and amid the general terror dead men were seen that had risen from their graves [...] there was a loud voice from Heaven [...] men were seen who were great and tall in stature, clothed in garments of glory [...] they cried thus: Jesus was crucified and has come again to life [...] and many people of the Jews were swallowed up by the earth».

In the “Anaphora Pilati”, Pontius Pilate appears as an astonished witness to the Resurrection. And it is manifest that he is so shaken that he is not too far from crossing the threshold that leads from heathendom to the true faith (folium 27r - Fig. 9):

«I was in great fear and trembling. I wrote all the things that I saw and happened. And I sent these things to thy Majesty, O Emperor [...] O Lord, I salute thee».

With another apocryphal work, the “Paradosis Pilati” (“The hand-over of Pilate”), an ancient text written in Greek, whose dating is uncertain, we take a further step towards Pilate's consecration as a full Christian. The “Paradosis” is contained in the same manuscript Grec 770 which we already considered for the “Anaphora”, starting from folium 27v (Fig. 10).

At the very moment of his harrowing death, which we will describe later in this series of articles, the former prefect of Judaea raises a desperate plea to the Heaven for him and his wife Procla:

«Pardon me, Lord, and your servant Procla, who stands with me in this hour of my death, whom you taught to prophesy that you must be benailed to the cross. [...] Pardon us and number us among your righteous ones».

And his prayer is answered, because an amazing miracle happens:

«Behold, when Pilate had finished his prayer, there sounded a voice from heaven, 'All generations and families of the Gentiles shall call you blessed, because in your governorship everything was fulfilled which the prophets foretold about me. And you yourself shall appear as my witness at my second coming».

Pilate as a righteous? Pilate as prophet? Pilate as a holy man? Doesn't it sound unbelievable, to our modern ears?

But the “Paradosis” goes even further: when Pilate is beheaded, «an angel of the Lord received his head». And brought it to Heaven.

Pontius Pilate as a saint. This is the astonishing conclusion of a mythical route that started at the moment of the Passion of Jesus Christ, in the first century, and ended today.

It did not end with the “Paradosis”. It ended its course right in our present days.

Because today Pontius Pilatus is, in actual reality, a saint. A recognised saint: St. Pilate. As we will see in the next article.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /11. Alla ricerca del rapporto ufficiale
Quando Gesù Cristo fu sottoposto alla crudele prova della Passione, Ponzio Pilato occupava una carica di alto rango in Giudea, in qualità di prefetto di quella remota provincia soggetta al dominio dei Romani. Secondo Giuseppe Flavio, era stato l'imperatore Tiberio Cesare a nominarlo in tale importante posizione ("Guerra giudaica", Libro II, 169); e proprio a Tiberio, che sedeva ancora sul trono imperiale quando la Passione ebbe luogo, egli dovette inoltrare il rapporto concernente tutti i fatti che si erano verificati in quel lontano e assai turbolento frammento dell'Impero Romano.

Pilato scrisse mai una relazione ufficiale sulla Passione?

E se lo fece, dove si trova quel rapporto?

La questione ha occupato l'attenzione della Cristianità sin dai primi secoli. Un rapporto ufficiale vergato da Ponzio Pilato e indirizzato al suo imperatore, infatti, costituirebbe la prova ultima e definitiva, prodotta da una fonte affidabile e indipendente, della effettiva verità della Passione, se non anche della Resurrezione. Una sorta di pistola fumante: una pistola molto speciale, in quanto rappresenterebbe la prova dell'Incarnazione di un Dio sulla terra (Fig. 1).

È mai veramente esistito un così fatale pezzo di papiro o pergamena?

Giustino Martire, un apologeta cristiano vissuto nel secondo secolo, ne era assolutamente convinto: nei Capitoli XXXV e XLVIII della sua "Prima Apologia", indirizzata all'imperatore Antonino Pio, egli annota che «tu puoi leggere tutto questo [a proposito della Passione di Gesù] nelle relazioni ufficiali che furono scritte da Ponzio Pilato», e «i rapporti vergati da Pilato forniscono la prova di tali eventi».

Abbiamo anche visto come Tertulliano, nel suo "Apologeticus", risalente al secondo secolo (Capitolo XXI, 24), scrisse che «tutte queste cose a proposito di Cristo, Pilato [...] le riferì all'allora imperatore Tiberio» (nel testo originale latino: «ea omnia super Christo Pilatus [...] Caesari tunc Tiberio nuntiavit»). E, nel quarto secolo, Eusebio di Cesarea, con la sua "Historia Ecclesiae" (Libro II, Capitolo II, 1-3), ribadì la medesima convinzione: «Ponzio Pilato riferì a Tiberio [...] i fatti riguardanti la resurrezione dai morti del nostro salvatore Gesù Cristo» (nella traduzione latina dall'originale in lingua greca: «De resurrectionem a mortuis domini et salvatoris nostri Iesu Christi [...] Pilatus Tiberio principi refert»).

Se un rapporto ufficiale su questi fatti è stato mai realmente vergato da Ponzio Pilato, l'originale di esso è andato da lungo tempo perduto, purtroppo, tra le nebbie dei millenni.

Nondimeno, qualcosa è sopravvissuto. Una relazione, scritta dal prefetto di Roma: l'uomo che ebbe un ruolo primario nelle vicende connesse con la morte di Gesù. In effetti, più di una singola relazione: ne esistono, infatti, più di una.

Cominciamo dalla più risalente: un'antichissima tradizione ha tramandato fino ai nostri giorni una lettera che Pilato avrebbe asseritamente indirizzato all'Imperatore Claudio, uno dei successori di Tiberio. Alcuni studiosi ne datano la redazione alla fine del secondo secolo, e certamente si tratta del più antico esemplare, appartenente alla tradizione apocrifa, che riguardi Ponzio Pilato.

Questo testo è spesso rinvenibile come una sezione del "Vangelo di Nicodemo", un'opera apocrifa che comprende diverse narrazioni, così come appare, ad esempio, nel manoscritto Vat Lat 4363 conservato presso la Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana. Naturalmente, la lettera, che pretenderebbe di rappresentare il ricercatissimo rapporto ufficiale sulla Passione originariamente redatto da Ponzio Pilato, nella propria qualità di prefetto della Giudea, e da lui inviato alla più alta autorità in Roma, non ha probabilmente nulla a che fare con qualsivoglia missiva ufficiale che sia mai stata effettivamente scritta dalla mano del prefetto romano. Nondimeno, stiamo considerando una testimonianza particolarmente antica dell'opinione che, tra i primi Cristiani, andava circolando su Pilato. Leggiamone il testo dall'antico manoscritto Latin 1871 (Bibliothèque Nationale de France, folium 1), risalente al decimo secolo (Fig. 2):

«Ponzio Pilato a Claudio, salute. Accaddero di recente alcuni fatti, dei quali fui diretto testimone...»

[Nel testo originale latino: «Pontius Pilatus Claudio salutem. Nuper accidit, et quod ipse probavi...»].

È, questo, l'inizio della lettera. In poche righe, Pilato ripercorre gli eventi che ebbero luogo di fronte a lui nel corso di quel fatale venerdì: i giudei che gli consegnano Gesù, il racconto dei numerosi miracoli compiuti da quell'uomo, le accuse, la sentenza e la crocifissione. Poi, tre giorni più tardi, un'inaspettata resurrezione («die tertio surrexit»), con i soldati incaricati della sorveglianza che attestano la verità di quegli accadimenti («nam et illum surrexisse testati sunt se vidisse») (Fig. 3). Il prefetto chiude poi quella lettera con una accusa diretta nei confronti dei giudei:

«Tutto questo ho riferito affinché nessuno possa raccontarne menzogne, e perché tu non reputi che possa darsi credito alle falsità dei giudei».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Haec ideo ingressi ne quis aliter mentiatur, et aestimes credendum mendaciis Iudaeorum»].

Di certo, non è questo il tenore della lettera che un prefetto responsabile del governo di una provincia romana potrebbe avere mai indirizzato all'attenzione del suo superiore gerarchico in Roma, ricolma, come in effetti è, di informazioni del tutto irrilevanti agli occhi di un imperatore in carica, e palesemente costruita da mani protocristiane al fine di potersi presentare come una prova della Resurrezione asseritamente compilata da un testimone pagano indipendente, con l'aggiunta di materiale chiaramente antiebraico.

Ma ciò che ci interessa maggiormente è il fatto che, in questo primo esempio a noi disponibile di un rapporto ufficiale, Pilato non è ancora rappresentato come un potenziale cristiano.

Eppure, il processo di trasformazione di un pagano, Ponzio Pilato, in uno sconcertato testimone della Resurrezione e, infine, in un vero e proprio cristiano è già in corso.

Andiamo a considerare, nuovamente, il "Vangelo di Nicodemo", un testo apocrifo che comprende materiale narrativo disparato, tradizionalmente etichettato con il citato titolo, del tutto inconsistente: la prima sezione, alquanto estesa, è conosciuta come "Gesta Pilati" o "Acta Pilati" ("I fatti di Pilato" o "Il rapporto di Pilato"), o anche come “Gesta Salvatoris” (“I fatti del Salvatore”): un'opera apocrifa la cui origine viene fatta risalire, dagli studiosi, a un'epoca collocata tra il quarto e il quinto secolo, con continue modifiche e integrazioni testuali apportate nel corso dei secoli successivi, a motivo della grande fortuna esperimentata da questo testo attraverso il Medioevo, con centinaia e centinaia di manoscritti sopravvissuti fino ai nostri giorni, redatti in varie lingue, tra le quali greco, latino, aramaico, armeno, copto e altre. Nel presente articolo, proporremo immagini tratte dal Codex 326 (1076), un manoscritto particolarmente antico che risale al nono secolo, conservato presso la Stiftsbibliothek dell'Abbazia di Einsiedeln, in Svizzera (Fig. 4).

Nelle "Gesta Pilati", la tradizione che pone sotto una favorevole luce il prefetto romano della Giudea si sviluppa ulteriormente, evolvendo in direzione di una rappresentazione della Passione che è certamente più benigna nei confronti di Pilato di quanto non accada all'interno dei Vangeli canonici. Un Pilato che è ormai molto prossimo a una piena conversione alla nuova fede cristiana.

In questo scritto apocrifo, Pilato appare stupefatto e colpito di fronte ai fatti miracolosi che accompagnano Gesù, al quale persino le insegne sorrette dagli alfieri nel palazzo del Pretorio si inchinano, come se gli stessero rendendo onore (folium 12r). Sollecitato dai giudei, ma non riuscendo a trovare alcuna colpa in quell'uomo, Pilato reagisce con rabbia («Pilatus furore repletus», folium 13r). Quando gli viene chiesto di ordinare la crocifissione di Gesù, egli risponde, senza alcuna ambiguità, che «questa non è cosa buona» («Non est bonum», folium 14r) (Fig. 5).

Appare chiaro come, nelle "Gesta Pilati", il governatore romano non intenda affatto condannare quell'uomo, tanto da appellarsi, del tutto inutilmente, alla folla tumultuante: «[Io sono convinto che] non tutto il popolo qui radunato desideri la sua morte» («non omnis multitudo vult eum mori», folium 14r). Ma i sacerdoti e i capi dei giudei non hanno alcuna intenzione di cedere. E quando Nicodemo il fariseo esprime la propria posizione in favore di Gesù, vengono pronunciate le seguenti significative parole (folium 14v - Fig. 6):

«Gli ebrei risposero a Nicodemo: 'Certamente anche tu sei divenuto un suo discepolo, visto che così apertamente pronunci parole in suo favore'. Ma Nicodemo ribatté: 'Forse voi pensate che anche il prefetto sia divenuto un suo discepolo, solo perché anch'egli ha parlato in suo favore?'».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Dicunt iudaei nichodemo: tu discipulus eius factus es et verbum pro ipso facis. Dicit ad eso nichodemus: numquid et praeses discipulus eius factus est et verbum pro ipso facit?»].

Il varco che separa il prefetto di Roma dal trasformarsi in un credente nel Cristo sta divenendo sempre più stretto: le "Gesta Pilati" suggeriscono chiaramente come Ponzio Pilato risulti essere ben più di un mero amministratore locale, perché la figura di Gesù avrebbe già scavato una breccia assai profonda nel suo cuore. Stiamo avvicinandoci, ormai, alla piena conversione di Pilato alla fede cristiana.

Numerose testimonianze in merito alla santità di Gesù continuano a emergere tra la folla. Pilato presta ascolto a vari racconti relativi a fatti miracolosi, egli si è ormai persuaso dell'innocenza di quell'uomo e ribatte aspramente alle pressioni dei giudei. Quando, alla fine, Gesù muore sulla Croce, e il sole svanisce ricoprendo d'ombra il mondo intero, mentre il velo del tempio si squarcia da cima a fondo, Pilato pare convincersi definitivamente della divinità di quel condannato (folium 16 v - Fig. 7):

«Pilato convocò i giudei e disse loro: 'Avete visto ciò che è accaduto?' Ma essi gli risposero: 'Non è che un'eclissi di sole, come spesso succede'».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Convocans autem pilatus iudaeos dicit eis: vidistis quae facta sunt? responderunt praesidi: Eclipsis factum est solis secundum consuetudinem»].

Ponzio Pilato, dunque, sta lentamente percorrendo la sua strada pluisecolare, trasformandosi a mano a mano in un cristiano della primissima ora.

Troviamo un ulteriore indizio di questo graduale processo di conversione nella "Anaphora Pilati" (“Relazione di Pilato”), un testo greco che contiene asseritamente, ancora una volta, il rapporto ufficiale sulla Passione scritto da Ponzio Pilato e indirizzato all'imperatore Tiberio a Roma. Naturalmente, l'"Anaphora" non è nulla di più di un testo tradizionale trasposto su pergamena secoli dopo la morte di Pilato. Di nuovo, questo testo non ha alcuna relazione con un possibile scritto originale vergato dallo stesso Pilato nel primo secolo; nondimeno, l'"Anaphora Pilati" offre un'ulteriore versione, in senso cristiano, del contenuto della relazione del prefetto romano, con l'obiettivo di configurare una convincente testimonianza in grado di confermare la veridicità della Resurrezione. Eccone il testo greco così come appare nel manoscritto Grec 770 conservato presso la Bibliothèque Nationale de France (folium 25r - Fig. 8):

«Al più potente, illustre, divino e più terribile, Augusto Cesare, Pilato governatore dell'Oriente. Devo riferirti, o potentissimo, notizie che molto mi hanno procurato timore e preoccupazione. Nel territorio soggetto al mio governo, nella città chiamata Gerusalemme, l'intero popolo dei giudei consegnò nelle mie mani un uomo di nome Gesù...».

Dopo questa magniloquente apertura, in poche pagine Pilato ripercorre gli eventi di quello straordinario venerdì a Gerusalemme. Il prefetto romano manifesta tutto il proprio stupore alla vista delle meraviglie soprannaturali occorse subito dopo la morte di Gesù:

«Una grande ombra si impadronì di tutto il mondo, perché il sole si oscurò, e le stelle si mostrarono ma senza il loro usuale splendore; e la luce della luna assunse la tinta del sangue [...] e ci furono grandi tuoni [...] e nel terrore di tutti si videro i morti levarsi dalle loro tombe [...] ci fu una potente voce che scese dal cielo [...] furono veduti uomini di grande corporatura e statura, ammantati in meravigliose vesti di gloria [...] essi così gridarono: Gesù, che fu crocifisso, è tornato alla vita [...] e molti giudei furono inghiottiti dalla terra ».

Nell'"Anaphora Pilati", Ponzio Pilato appare come uno stupefatto testimone della Resurrezione. Ed è palese come egli risulti essere assai profondamente colpito da quegli straordinari eventi, tanto da essere ormai sul punto di attraversare la soglia che separa i pagani dalla vera fede (folium 27r - Fig. 9):

«Ebbi paura, e ne fui sconvolto. Ho scritto queste cose, ciò che io vidi accadere. E ho inviato questi fatti alla tua maestà, o imperatore [...] o signore, io ti saluto».

Con un'ulteriore opera apocrifa, la "Paradosis Pilati" ("La consegna di Pilato"), un antico testo vergato in lingua greca, dall'incerta datazione, avanziamo di un altro passo in direzione della consacrazione di Pilato in qualità di cristiano a tutti gli effetti. La “Paradosis” è contenuta nello stesso manoscritto Grec 770 che abbiamo già avuto modo di considerare per l'“Anaphora”, con inizio dal folium 27v (Fig. 10).

Nel momento stesso della sua atroce esecuzione, che descriveremo successivamente in questa stessa serie di articoli, l'uomo che fu il prefetto della Giudea innalza una disperata preghiera al cielo per se stesso e per sua moglia Procla:

«Perdona me, o Signore, e la tua serva Procla, che è qui al mio fianco nell'ora della mia morte, alla quale avevi insegnato a preannunciare la tua Passione sulla croce. [...] Perdonaci, e ammettici tra le schiere dei tuoi giusti».

E la sua preghiera fu esaudita, perché un miracolo straordinario ha improvvisamente luogo :

«Incredibile a vedersi, quando Pilato cessò di parlare, una voce risuonò dai cieli, 'Tutte le generazioni e la discendenza dei Gentili ti chiameranno beato, perché sotto il tuo governatorato si compì di me tutto quello che i profeti avevano preannunciato. E anche tu ritornerai come mio testimone il giorno del mio secondo avvento».

Pilato come un giusto? Pilato assimilato a un profeta? Pilato assunto a uomo santo? Non suona incredibile, alle nostre orecchie di moderni?

Ma la "Paradosis" si spinge ancora più oltre: quando Pilato viene decapitato, «un angelo del Signore ricevette la sua testa». E la trasportò in cielo.

Ponzio Pilato come un uomo santo. È questa la sconcertante conclusione di un percorso mitico che ha avuto inizio con la Passione di Gesù Cristo, nel primo secolo, ed è terminato oggi.

Infatti, questo processo non si è affatto concluso con la "Paradosis", ma è invece terminato direttamente ai nostri giorni.

Perché Pilato, nella nostra realtà contemporanea, è un vero e proprio santo. Un santo formalmente riconosciuto: San Pilato. Come vedremo nel prossimo articolo.














































































































































15 May 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /10. The man who saw the truth
As we saw in our previous article, in the first centuries of Christianity Pontius Pilate, the fifth prefect of Judaea who had played a major role in the Passion of Jesus, was considered as a sort of pagan herald of the Salvation, despite his manifest responsibilities in the events that led to the death of the Saviour: he began to be seen as a man who had not intended to condemn the Son of God, and as a representative of the Roman Empire who had just yielded to the pressure of the Jews, a governor who had even submitted passionate reports to his Emperor in which he maintained that the Christians were the followers of a true God (Fig. 1).

In this view, held my many early-Christian authors, Pilate was seen as a person who had felt, in his own soul, the call of the Spirit, as portrayed in the early fifth century by Augustine of Hippo in his “Homiliae de tempore”, “In festo Epiphaniae domini”, Sermo III (Fig. 2):

«Pilatus as well had received a whiff of the truth, when in the title which he put on the cross he wrote: 'King of the Jews', that the mistaken Jews tried to amend. And Pilate replied to them: 'What I have written I have written', for the Psalm had said 'The writing on the title shall not be corrupted'».

[In the original Latin text: «Hinc et Pilatus nonnulla utique aura veritatis afflatus est, quando in eius passione titulum scripsit: Rex Iudaeorum: quem Iudaei conati sunt mendosi emendare. Quibus ille respondit: Quod scripsi, scripsi: quia praedictum erat in Psalmo: Tituli inscriptionem ne corrumpas»].

Actually Pilate was in good company, because Augustine, in his “De civitate Dei”, had already enrolled the classical Sibyls, too, in this very same prophesying role (see our previous paper “World of the Sibyl: the Italian Apennines and the Sibillini Mountain Range”).

However Pontius Pilate's transformation is not yet over.

Because the key to his changing figure and tradition, a ghost-like, ever-transforming semblance journeying across the centuries, is to be retrieved in a much more shadowy territory than that of known, reputable classical authors we already quoted from, such as Philo of Alexandria, Flavius Josephus, Origen of Alexandria, Tertullianus, Eusebius of Caesarea, Paulus Orosius and Augustine of Hippo.

We must address the obscure, indistinct world of the apocryphal writings.

Out of the canonical list of books formally accepted by the Church since the Council of Rome held in the year 382, the apocryphal writings tell more on Jesus and his life and Passion than the agreed-upon Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John (Fig. 3). Yet their origin, authorship and editing history are often unknown or poorly known, and the adherence of their narrative to actual truth, or at least to the original underlying traditions, is questionable and hard to trace.

Despite all that, the fascinating, controversial character of Pontius Pilate is one of the main figures addressed by some of the apocryphal writings. From the “Epistola Pilati” to the “Gesta Pilati”, from the “Anaphora Pilati” to the “Paradosis Pilati”, up to the “Legenda Aurea”, the prefect of Rome who, willingly or unwillingly, sentenced Jesus to death, makes his appearance in many ancient writings.

For better of for worse.

Let's start from the better: the many apocryphal representations of the Roman prefect which portray Pilate as a deeply troubled man, a person who had assisted to the grievous deeds of the killing of a righteous, and had the chance to behold the subsequent portentous events, so impressive that he himself had begun to believe that that crucified man was really a God, and had written about all he had seen in his official reports addressed to the Emperor in Rome.

A man who had started is own personal journey into faith, and sanctity.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /10. L'uomo che vide la verità
Come abbiamo avuto modo di vedere nei precedenti articoli, nel corso dei primi secoli della Cristianità Ponzio Pilato, il quinto prefetto della Giudea, l'uomo che interpretò un ruolo fondamentale nella Passione di Gesù, fu considerato come una sorta di testimone pagano della Salvezza, malgrado la sua palese responsabilità negli eventi che condussero il Salvatore alla morte sulla Croce: egli fu ritenuto come un giudice che non avrebbe affatto desiderato la condanna del Figlio di Dio, e come un rappresentante dell'Impero Romano che era stato costretto a cedere, suo malgrado, alle pressioni esercitate dai Giudei, un governatore che aveva addirittura inviato un'appassionata relazione al proprio imperatore, rapporto nel quale egli avrebbe sostenuto come i Cristiani fossero realmente i seguaci di un vero Dio (Fig. 1).

In questo scenario, sostenuto da vari autori protocristiani, Pilato fu considerato come un uomo il quale aveva potuto percepire, nel profondo del proprio animo, la chiamata dello Spirito, così come affermato nel quinto secolo da Agostino di Ippona nelle sue “Homiliae de tempore”, “In festo Epiphaniae domini”, Sermone III (Fig. 2):

«Anche Pilato era stato in qualche modo toccato dal soffio della verità, quando nel titolo che pose sulla Croce fece scrivere: 'Re dei Giudei', che gli ebrei tentarono di fargli correggere. Ma egli rispose loro: 'Ciò che ho scritto, ho scritto', così come era stato predetto nel Salmo: 'Non muterai quanto è scritto nel titolo'».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Hinc et Pilatus nonnulla utique aura veritatis afflatus est, quando in eius passione titulum scripsit: Rex Iudaeorum: quem Iudaei conati sunt mendosi emendare. Quibus ille respondit: Quod scripsi, scripsi: quia praedictum erat in Psalmo: Tituli inscriptionem ne corrumpas»].

E così Pilato venne a trovarsi in buona compagnia, perché Agostino, nella sua "De civitate Dei", aveva già provveduto ad arruolare nel medesimo ruolo profetico anche le Sibille classiche (si veda il nostro precedente articolo "Il mondo della Sibilla: gli Appennini e il Massiccio dei Monti Sibillini").

Ma la trasformazione di Ponzio Pilato non è affatto terminata.

Perché la chiave della sua mutevole figura, un'apparenza spettrale in continua metamorfosi, transitante attraverso i secoli, deve essere reperita in un territorio assai più indistinto e sconosciuto rispetto a quello marcato dalla presenza degli illustri, ben conosciuti autori classici già da noi citati, quali Filone d'Alessandria, Flavio Giuseppe, Origene d'Alessandria, Tertulliano, Eusebio di Cesarea, Paolo Orosio e Agostino d'Ippona.

Dobbiamo invece rivolgerci verso l'oscuro, sfuggente regno degli scritti apocrifi.

Esclusi della canonica lista di testi formalmente accettata dalla Chiesa sin dal Concilio di Roma, tenutosi nell'anno 382, gli scritti apocrifi ci raccontano molto di più, a proposito della figura di Gesù, della sua vita e della sua Passione, di quanto non ci narrino i Vangeli di Matteo, Marco, Luca e Giovanni (Fig. 3). Eppure la loro origine, la mano che li vergò, la storia delle modifiche alle quali furono sottoposti nel tempo è spesso sconosciuta, o comunque scarsamente nota. E l'aderenza dei racconti in essi riportati a una verità effettiva, o quantomeno alla sottostante tradizione originale, è assai dubbia e particolarmente difficile da tracciare.

Malgrado ciò, l'affascinante e controverso personaggio di Ponzio Pilato costituisce una delle principali figure descritte in alcuni testi appartenenti al mondo degli scritti apocrifi. Dall'"Epistola Pilati alle "Gesta Pilati", dall'“Anaphora Pilati” alla “Paradosis Pilati”, fino alla “Legenda Aurea”, il prefetto romano che, volente o nolente, condannò Gesù a morte, fa la propria apparizione in molti testi antichi.

Nel bene. E nel male.

Cominciamo dunque dal bene: iniziamo dalle molte rappresentazioni apocrife che descrivono il prefetto di Roma come un uomo angosciato, una persona che avrebbe assistito ai funesti eventi che sarebbero risultati nell'assassinio di un giusto, e si sarebbe trovato nella condizione di osservare con i propri occhi gli avvenimenti portentosi verificatisi successivamente, così impressionanti che egli stesso avrebbe cominciato a convincersi del fatto che l'uomo inchiodato sulla Croce fosse realmente un Dio, e avrebbe raccontato tutto questo nei rapporti ufficiali da lui stesso vergati e inviati a Roma, all'attenzione dell'imperatore.

Un uomo, Pilato, che avrebbe cominciato il proprio personale viaggio nella fede, e nella santità.
















































13 May 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /9. An unexpected Christian
In our previous articles, we have outlined the figure and traits of Pontius Pilate, a historical character who actually lived in the first half of the first century and held a high-rank post as prefect of the Roman province of Judaea, according to the ancient classical sources. The man is described as a wicked, ruthless person, who used to pay little or no heed at all to local customs, showing a substantial neglect of his subjects' needs and expectations, particularly when it came to religious affairs. Corruption and abuse were commonplace under his administration, and the opinions held on him by writers such as Philo of Alexandria and Flavius Josephus were definitely in the negative. Aspects of cowardice and sadistic cruelty can also be highlighted in the available descriptive excerpts.

The same Pontius Pilate also plays a key role in the tragic events related to the Passion and death of Jesus Christ, as described in the Gospels of John, Matthew, Mark and Luke. In the listed Christian sources, Pilate conducts himself essentially in a cowardly way, scared of the roaring mob and fearing that his ineptitude might be reported to his ultimate boss in Rome, Emperor Tiberius.

However, despite the adverse picture painted by both the Gospels and non-Christian authors, in the first centuries of Christianity Pilate was considered as a sort of positive figure: a man who had made repeated though faint attempts at saving Jesus' life («I find no fault in him», he had told the Jews more than once), a Roman leader who appeared to be on the verge of an early conversion to the new blossoming religion, right under the shadow of the Cross.

Unbelievable as it may seem, as early as the end of the second century, a Christian author, Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus, in his “Apologeticum”, spent words to cast a very favorable light on the Roman prefect. Let's read them from the eleventh-century manuscript Latin 1656A, preserved at the Bibliothèque Nationale de France (folium 156v) (Fig. 1):

«All these things with reference to Christ, Pilate, who himself also in his own conscience was now a Christian, reported to the then emperor Tiberius».

[In the original Latin text: «Ea omnia super Christo Pilatus, et ipse iam pro sua conscientia Christianus, Caesari tunc Tiberio nuntiavit»].

In Tertullianus' opinion, Pontius Pilatus was so impressed by the deeds and miracles reportedly accomplished by Jesus Christ that not only he became a sort of undisclosed Christian devotee, but he also succeeded in convincing Emperor Tiberius himself of the divine nature of the crucified man (“Apologeticum”, folium 144v) (Fig. 2):

«Thus Tiberius, in whose time the Christian name first made its appearance in the world, laid before the senate tidings from Syria Palestine which had revealed to him the truth of the divinity there manifested, and supported the motion by his own vote to begin with. The senate rejected it because it had not itself given its approval. But Caesar held to his own opinion and threatened danger to the accusers of the Christians».

[In the original Latin text: «Tiberius ergo, cuius tempore nomen Christianum in saeculum introivit, adnuntiata sibi ex Syria Palaestina, quae illic veritatem ipsius divinitatis revelaverant, detulit ad senatum cum praerogativa suffragii sui. Senatus, quia non ipse probaverat, respuit, Caesar in sententia mansit, comminatus periculum accusatoribus Christianorum»].

From this first, very early literary passage, we see that Pontius Pilate, the vicious prefect who certainly did not spend so great an effort to save Jesus from his doom of torture and death, in the first centuries of Christianity began to be turned into a well-intentioned administrator who, all in all, wasn't that bad as it might have appeared at a first glance; and this positive view also applied to his imperial counterpart in Rome, Tiberius.

Was that of Tertullianus an isolated opinion? No, as he was not the only early-Christian author to hold this belief. Let's read the following words, which were written in Greek by Eusebius of Caesarea, a fourth-century bishop and historian, in his “Historia Ecclesiae” (Book II, Chapter II), the way this excerpt appears in the eleventh-century manuscript Grec 1431 preserved at the Bibliothèque Nationale de France (folium 29r), in which we highlighted the Greek words for 'Pilate' and 'Tiberius' (Fig. 3):

«Pontius Pilate reported to Emperor Tiberius about the resurrection of our saviour Jesus from the dead, as the news were already spreading across Palestine. He also gave an account of other wonders which he had learned of him, and how, after his death, having risen from the dead, he was now believed by many to be a God. They say that Tiberius referred the matter to the Senate, but that they rejected it, ostensibly because they had not first examined into the matter, and the voice of the people had anticipated its decision on the issue. In fact there was an ancient law that no one should be made a God by the Romans except by a vote and decree of the Senate. In reality the recognition of a divine nature certainly needed no confirmation and recommendation by any man. So, as we stated above, the Senate rejected that proposition; yet Tiberius still retained the opinion which he had held at first, and contrived no hostile measures against the new Christian religion».

And we may also quote from Paulus Orosius, an early-Christian theologian and historian who lived between the fourth century and the fifth, who was specifically mentioned by Antoine de la Sale in his “The Paradise of Queen Sibyl”. Once again, in Orosius' “Historiarum adversus paganos” (Book 7, IV) we find a further description, possibly drawn from the same Tertullianus, of a bewildered Pontius Pilate, who appears to be so amazed at the tales on Jesus Christ which were reported to him that he persuaded his Emperor in Rome, too, of the verity of the new religion. We take this passage from a most ancient manuscript, dating back to the ninth century (no. 545 (499), Bibliothèque Municipale de Valenciennes, folia 105v and 106r) (Fig. 4):

«When the Lord Christ had suffered and risen from the dead and had sent forth His disciples to preach, Pilate, the governor of the province of Palestine, made a report to the Emperor Tiberius and to the Senate concerning the passion and resurrection of Christ, and also the subsequent miracles that had been publicly performed by Him or were being done by His disciples in His name. Pilate also stated that a rapidly increasing multitude believed Him to be a god. When Tiberius, amid great approval, proposed to the Senate that Christ should be considered a god, the Senate became indignant because the matter had not been referred to it earlier in accordance with the usual custom, so that it might be the first to pass upon the recognition of a new cult. The Senate therefore refused to deify Christ and issued an edict that the Christians should be banished from the City. There was also the special reason that Sejanus, the prefect of Tiberius, was inflexibly opposed to the recognition of this religion. Nevertheless in an edict Tiberius threatened denouncers of Christians with death».

[In the original Latin text: «at postquam passus est Dominus Christus atque a mortuis resurrexit et discipulos suos ad praedicandum dimisit, Pilatus, praeses Palaestinae prouinciae, ad Tiberium imperatorem atque ad senatum retulit de passione et resurrectione Christi consequentibusque uirtutibus, quae uel per ipsum palam factae fuerant uel per discipulos ipsius in nomine eius fiebant, et de eo, quod certatim crescente plurimorum fide deus crederetur. Tiberius cum suffragio magni fauoris retulit ad senatum, ut Christus deus haberetur. Senatus indignatione motus, cur non sibi prius secundum morem delatum esset, ut de suscipiendo cultu prius ipse decerneret, consecrationem Christi recusavit edictoque constituit, exterminandos esse urbe Christianos; praecipue cum et Seianus praefectus Tiberii suscipiendae religioni obstinatissime contradiceret. Tiberius tamen edicto accusatoribus Christianorum mortem comminatus est»].

So, was Pilatus really to be held guilty for the death of Jesus Christ, the Saviour, the Son of God?

According to early-Christian writers, the answer was no. Pilate, Tiberius and the Romans weren't ultimately to be considered as the perpetrators of such a crime. Actually a much easier target was to be found near at hand, as shown in the following sentence:

«It was not so much Pilate that condemned Him (he knew that 'for envy the Jews had delivered Him'), as the Jewish nation instead, which has been condemned by God, and rent in pieces, and dispersed over the whole earth, in a degree far beyond what happened to Pentheus».

This passage is drawn from an ancient Christian treatise, “Kata Kelsou” (“Against Celsum”, Book II), as it appears in manuscript Grec 616 preserved at the Bibliothèque Nationale de France (folium 76v) (Fig. 5 - with the words for 'Pentheus' and 'Pilate' highlighted). These words were written by Origen of Alexandria, a Christian theologian and scholar who lived between the end of the second and the beginning of the third century. He quotes from the Gospel of Mark («for he knew that the chief priests had delivered him for envy», 15:10), and compares the tragic destiny of the Jews to that of Pentheus, the King of Thebes who was dismembered out of a divine punishment (we will soon meet this King again in a later article).

Thus, the basic idea was that the guilt for the killing of a God did not lay with Pontius Pilate: instead, the blame was to be put on the Jewish nation.

The evil seeds of a ghastly doctrine, Anti-Semitism, had just been planted. And that doctrine would ravage across future centuries.

Sadly enough, this racist course of thought has deeply marked the Christian mentality up to the present days, together with this odd idea of an alleged innocence of Pilate. For instance, more than a thousand years later we find a trace of this very same idea re-stated in a version of St. Jerome's “Commentary on Matthew” edited by the great Dutch scholar Erasmus of Rotterdam and published in 1537 (the words below were not written by fifth-century theologist St. Jerome, as they are not present in earlier manuscripts bearing the text of his “Commentarius in Matthaeum”, therefore being a sixteenth-century interpolation by Erasmus, as scholars maintain) (Fig. 6):

«Pilate gave multiple opportunities for freeing the Savior: first by offering a thief for a just man; then by adding: "What then shall I do about Jesus who is called Christ? [...] what evil has he done?" In saying this, Pilate absolved Jesus. [...] Thus, in the washing of his hands, the actions of the Gentiles are cleansed, and in some manner he estranges us from the impiety of the Jews».

[In the original Latin text: «Multas liberandi salvatoris Pilatus occasiones dedit. Primum latrone iusto conferens. Deinde inferens: Quid igitur faciam de Iesu qui dicitur Christus [...] Quid eum mali fecit. Hoc dicendo Pilatus absolvit Iesum. [...] Ut in lavacro manuum eius, gentilium opera purgarentur, et ab impietate Iudaeorum [...] nos alienos faceret»].

But let's stick to the first centuries of the Christian era. In the next article, we will continue our exploration of a surprisingly good, unexpectedly Christian Pontius Pilate.

A Pilate who is going to be promoted to a much higher position: that of a saint.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /9. Un cristiano inatteso
Nei nostri precedenti articoli abbiamo tratteggiato la figura e le caratteristiche di Ponzio Pilato, un personaggio storico che visse nella prima metà del primo secolo, e che occupò una posizione di elevato livello in qualità di prefetto della provincia romana della Giudea, così come riferito dalle fonti letterarie classiche. L'uomo è descritto come una persona malvagia e priva di scrupoli, la quale poco o nulla si curava degli usi e delle tradizioni locali, mostrando un peculiare disprezzo per le esigenze e i desideri espressi dal popolo a lui assoggettato, in special modo quando si trattava di affrontare questioni religiose. Corruzione e abusi erano parte integrante del suo modo di amministrare i territori a lui affidati, e l'opinione che di lui serbavano autori come Filone d'Alessandria e Flavio Giuseppe era segnatamente negativa. Nei brani che ne descrivono il carattere, è possibile anche rinvenire tratti di codardia e sadica crudeltà.

Lo stesso Ponzio Pilato partecipa, con un ruolo fondamentale, ai tragici eventi connessi alla Passione e morte di Gesù Cristo, così come essi vengono presentati nei Vangeli di Giovanni, Matteo, Marco e Luca. In tali fonti cristiane, Pilato si comporta essenzialmente in modo vigliacco, spaventato dalle folle rumoreggianti e nel timore che la sua inettitudine potesse essere riferita al suo massimo superiore gerarchico in Roma, l'imperatore Tiberio.

Eppure, malgrado il quadro avverso tracciato sia nei brani tratti dai Vangeli che nelle parole degli antichi autori non cristiani, nei primi secoli della Cristianità Pilato fu considerato come un personaggio non del tutto negativo: un uomo che aveva posto in atto ripetuti, seppur deboli, tentativi per salvare la vita di Gesù («non trovo in lui nessuna colpa», aveva dichiarato ai giudei più di una volta), un dirigente della Roma imperiale che pareva trovarsi sul punto di una vera e propria conversione, 'ante litteram' e direttamente all'ombra della Croce, alla nuova religione che stava in quel momento nascendo.

Per quanto ciò possa apparire incredibile, già alla fine del secondo secolo un autore cristiano, Quinto Settimio Fiorente Tertulliano, nel suo "Apologeticum", vergò alcune parole che gettano una luce assai favorevole sul prefetto romano. Andiamo a leggere questa particolare frase nelle pagine del manoscritto Latin 1656A, risalente all'undicesimo secolo e conservato presso la Bibliothèque Nationale de France (folium 156v) (Fig. 1):

«Tutte queste cose a proposito di Cristo furono riferite all'imperatore Tiberio da Pilato, il quale, nella propria coscienza, era divenuto egli stesso un cristiano».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Ea omnia super Christo Pilatus, et ipse iam pro sua conscientia Christianus, Caesari tunc Tiberio nuntiavit»].

Nel pensiero di Tertulliano, Ponzio Pilato ricevette un'impressione così forte a seguito delle notizie concernenti gli atti e i miracoli attribuiti a Gesù, che egli non solo sarebbe divenuto una sorta di credente in Cristo, in modo latente e non dichiarato, ma sarebbe anche riuscito a convincere lo stesso imperatore Tiberio della verità della natura divina dell'uomo che era stato crocifisso ("Apologeticum", folium 144v) (Fig. 2):

«Allora Tiberio, al cui tempo apparve per la prima volta nella storia il nome di Cristo, presentò al Senato le notizie provenienti dalla Siria Palestina tramite le quali gli era stata rivelata la divinità che lì si era manifestata, fornendo il proprio personale appoggio a questa mozione. Ma il Senato, che non aveva promosso tale posizione, la rigettò; Cesare però rimase della propria opinione, e minacciò di far punire chi avesse perseguito i cristiani».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Tiberius ergo, cuius tempore nomen Christianum in saeculum introivit, adnuntiata sibi ex Syria Palaestina, quae illic veritatem ipsius divinitatis revelaverant, detulit ad senatum cum praerogativa suffragii sui. Senatus, quia non ipse probaverat, respuit, Caesar in sententia mansit, comminatus periculum accusatoribus Christianorum»].

Da questo primo, assai antico passaggio, possiamo rilevare come Ponzio Pilato, il brutale prefetto che certamente non si spese in modo particolarmente determinato per salvare Gesù dal suo destino di tortura e morte, nel corso dei primi secoli della Cristianità cominciò a essere considerato come un benintenzionato amministratore che, alla fine dei conti, non era poi così malvagio come poteva a prima vista apparire; e questa positiva valutazione poteva essere estesa anche alla sua controparte imperiale a Roma, Tiberio.

Era solo Tertulliano a sostenere questa opinione? No, perché egli non fu affatto l'unico autore protocristiano ad alimentare questa convinzione. Proviamo a leggere le seguenti parole, vergate in lingua greca da Eusebio di Cesarea, vescovo e storico vissuto nel quarto secolo, nella sua “Historia Ecclesiae” (Libro II, Capitolo II), così come esse appaiono nel manoscritto Grec 1431, risalente all'undicesimo secolo e conservato presso la Bibliothèque Nationale de France (folium 29r), nel quale abbiamo posto in evidenza le parole 'Pilato' e 'Tiberio' (Fig. 3):

«Pilato riferì a Tiberio a proposito della resurrezione dalla morte del nostro signore e salvatore Gesù Cristo, notizie che già si erano diffuse ovunque. E riferì anche degli ulteriori miracoli da lui compiuti, e come, a causa della sua resurrezione dalla morte, molti fossero già convinti che egli fosse un dio. Tiberio riferì al Senato tutti questi fatti dei quali era venuto a conoscenza; ma si dice che il Senato li rifiutasse, a causa del fatto che tali cose non erano state riferite in primo luogo ad esso, e che la sua autorità era stata in ogni caso precorsa dalla voce del popolo. Inoltre, esisteva un'antica legge, secondo la quale nessuno avrebbe potuto essere considerato una divinità presso i romani, se non vi fosse stato un decreto di conferma emesso dal Senato. D'altra parte occorre considerare come nessuna natura divina possa avere bisogno di una conferma ottenuta a mezzo di un'umana deliberazione. Comunque, benché, come abbiamo narrato in precedenza, il Senato avesse negato il proprio consenso, Tiberio emise comunque un proprio decreto, affinché nessuna misura fosse disposta contro la dottrina del Cristo».

E possiamo anche menzionare un passaggio tratto da Paolo Orosio, teologo e storico cristiano che visse tra il quarto e il quinto secolo, il quale fu citato anche da Antoine de la Sale nel suo "Il Paradiso della Regina Sibilla". Di nuovo, anche nella “Historiarum adversus paganos”, scritta da Orosio (Libro 7, IV), ci imbattiamo in una ulteriore descrizione, forse ispirata allo stesso brano di Tertulliano, concernente uno sconcertato Ponzio Pilato, che pare avere provato un tale sentimento di stupore, all'udire i racconti concernenti Gesù Cristo, da riuscire a persuadere lo stesso imperatore di Roma della verità della nuova religione. Traiamo questo passaggio da un manoscritto estremamente antico, risalente al nono secolo (n. 545 (499), Bibliothèque Municipale de Valenciennes, folia 105v and 106r) (Fig. 4):

«E quando Cristo Signore ebbe sofferto e fu risorto dai morti, e dopo che egli ebbe inviato i propri discepoli nella predicazione, Pilato, prefetto della provincia di Palestina, inviò un rapporto all'imperatore Tiberio e al Senato a proposito della passione e della resurrezione di Cristo, riferendo inoltre in merito ai successivi miracoli che erano stati da Lui compiuti pubblicamente o che comunque erano stati compiuti dai Suoi discepoli nel Suo nome, raccontando di come egli fosse reputato un dio dalla fede di una crescente moltitudine. Tiberio riferì tutto questo al Senato, accompagnando il rapporto con la sua più favorevole approvazione, affinché Cristo fosse considerato come un dio. Ma il Senato, con un moto di indignazione, perché la questione non era stata demandata in primo luogo ad esso secondo l'antico costume, il quale voleva che fosse proprio il Senato a decidere sulla proclamazione di un nuovo culto, rifiutò ogni consacrazione di Cristo, e anzi emise un editto, affinché i Cristiani fossero banditi dalla città. In particolare, fu il prefetto di Tiberio, Seiano, a opporsi con determinazione alla nuova religione. Tuttavia, Tiberio, con un proprio editto, ordinò che gli oppositori dei cristiani fossero puniti con la morte».

[Nel testo originale latino: «at postquam passus est Dominus Christus atque a mortuis resurrexit et discipulos suos ad praedicandum dimisit, Pilatus, praeses Palaestinae prouinciae, ad Tiberium imperatorem atque ad senatum retulit de passione et resurrectione Christi consequentibusque uirtutibus, quae uel per ipsum palam factae fuerant uel per discipulos ipsius in nomine eius fiebant, et de eo, quod certatim crescente plurimorum fide deus crederetur. Tiberius cum suffragio magni fauoris retulit ad senatum, ut Christus deus haberetur. Senatus indignatione motus, cur non sibi prius secundum morem delatum esset, ut de suscipiendo cultu prius ipse decerneret, consecrationem Christi recusavit edictoque constituit, exterminandos esse urbe Christianos; praecipue cum et Seianus praefectus Tiberii suscipiendae religioni obstinatissime contradiceret. Tiberius tamen edicto accusatoribus Christianorum mortem comminatus est»].

Dunque, Pilato fu realmente colpevole della morte di Gesù Cristo, il Salvatore, il Figlio di Dio?

Secondo vari autori protocristiani, la risposta era negativa. Pilato, Tiberio e i Romani non dovevano essere considerati, in ultima analisi, come gli artefici di un tale crimine. In effetti, a portata di mano era disponibile un bersaglio assai più facile, così come è rilevabile nel seguente passaggio:

«Non fu tanto Pilato a condannarLo (il quale sapeva che 'per invidia i giudei lo avevano consegnato'), quanto il popolo giudeo, che proprio per questo è stato punito da Dio, e distrutto, e disperso su tutta la terra, molto più di quanto non sia stato disperso lo stesso Penteo».

Questo brano è tratto da un antico trattato cristiano, "Kata Kelsou" ("Contro Celso"), così come esso appare nel manoscritto Grec 616 conservato presso la Bibliothèque Nationale de France (folium 76v) (Fig. 5 - con le parole 'Penteo' e 'Pilato' evidenziate). Questo passaggio fu scritto da Origene di Alessandria, un teologo e studioso cristiano vissuto tra la fine del secondo secolo e l'inizio del terzo. Egli cita dal Vangelo di Marco («sapeva infatti che i sommi sacerdoti glielo avevano consegnato per invidia», 15:10) e, inoltre, paragona il tragico destino del popolo ebraico a quello di Penteo, il re di Tebe che fu smembrato a seguito di una punizione divina (incontreremo nuovamente questo re in un successivo articolo).

Dunque, l'idea era quella di non caricare affatto Pilato della colpa di avere fatto uccidere Gesù: quella colpa poteva essere ben caricata, invece, sulla nazione ebraica.

I maligni semi di un'agghiacciante dottrina, l'antisemitismo, erano stati appena piantati. E avrebbero devastato i secoli a venire.

Assai sciaguratamente, questa linea di pensiero razzista ha profondamente marcato la mentalità del Cristianesimo fino ai nostri giorni, accompagnata dalla bizzarra idea di una pretesa innocenza di Pilato. Ad esempio, più di mille anni dopo ritroveremo tracce di questo stesso convincimento espresse nuovamente in una versione dei "Commenti al Vangelo di Matteo" di San Gerolamo, edita dal grande studioso olandese Erasmo da Rotterdam e pubblicata nel 1537 (le parole che qui riportiamo non furono vergate nel quinto secolo dallo stesso San Gerolamo, in quanto esse non sono presenti nei manoscritti maggiormente antichi che contengono il testo del suo "Commentarius in Matthaeum", e quindi rappresentano un'interpolazione effettuata da Erasmo nel sedicesimo secolo, così come sostenuto da alcuni studiosi) (Fig. 6):

«Pilato offrì molte opportunità per la liberazione del Salvatore: in primo luogo, offrendo un ladrone al posto di un giusto; poi, aggiungendo: 'Cosa dovrei fare di questo Gesù che è chiamato il Cristo [...] Quale male avrebbe egli compiuto?' Così dicendo, Pilato volle assolvere Gesù. [...] E così, lavando le proprie mani, purificò l'operato i Gentili da ogni colpa, rendendoci così estranei alle scellerate azioni dei giudei».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Multas liberandi salvatoris Pilatus occasiones dedit. Primum latrone iusto conferens. Deinde inferens: Quid igitur faciam de Iesu qui dicitur Christus [...] Quid eum mali fecit. Hoc dicendo Pilatus absolvit Iesum. [...] Ut in lavacro manuum eius, gentilium opera purgarentur, et ab impietate Iudaeorum [...] nos alienos faceret»].

Ma ritorniamo ancora ai primi secoli dell'era cristiana. Nel prossimo articolo, continueremo la nostra esplorazione della figura positiva, e inaspettamente cristiana, di Ponzio Pilato.

Un Pilato che sta per essere promosso a una posizione assai più elevata: quello di vero e proprio santo.




































































































5 May 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /8. The man who let Jesus die
«Pilate then went out unto them, and said, What accusation bring ye against this man?» (Fig. 1).

This is the opening remark pronounced by Pontius Pilate after his first appearance in the Gospel of John (18:29). Jesus Christ is standing before him, after having been seized by the Jews. They try, in tumult and anger, to induce the Roman ruler of Judaea to sentence him, and sentence him to death.

Pilate begins to question Jesus, but he can «find in him no fault at all» (John 18:38). Under pressure, he makes an attempt at satisfying the populace's crave for blood by scourging Jesus. However, this is not enough for the mob: when he addresses the clamouring Jews by saying «Behold, I bring him forth to you, that ye may know that I find no fault in him» (John 19:4), they call for him to crucify the prisoner.

We can see the above words spoken by Pilate as they appear in the folia 1377 and 1378 of the most antique Codex Vaticanus (Vat. Gr. 1209), preserved at the Vatican Apostolic Library, a precious fourth-century manuscript bearing the oldest extant specimen of the Gospels, in their original Greek version (Fig. 2).

Now Pilate finds himself in dire straits. And we know from Flavius Josephus and Philo of Alexandria that when he founds himself in distress the Roman prefect gets less vicious and increasingly hesitant.

He tries to discard the case by telling the leaders of the Jews «take ye him, and crucify him: for I find no fault in him» (John 19:6), stating for the third time that he thinks that Jesus is guilty of nothing.

But the reaction is vehement, and the Roman prefect «was the more afraid» (John 19:8) (Fig. 3).

He is scared, and we see this fundamental Greek word enlarged in the figure. He fears grave consequences for his rule and his own personal safety if he does not give in to the requests made by the Jews and their leaders. In this predicament, he utters the most famous questions «What is truth?» (John 18:38) (Fig. 4); yet this is no philosopher's enquiry, but just a makeshift attempt to gain additional time, thinking and rethinking in his mind how to escape this dangerous predicament.

This is the very moment in which, according to an antique tradition, Pontius Pilate begins to be loaded with his own grave, fateful, unforgivable guilt: he gives up to the Jews, and consents to proceeding with the execution of Jesus Christ, the Son of God.

He himself tells Jesus the words which will mark his own personal doom for the centuries to come: «knowest thou not that I have power to crucify thee, and have power to release thee?» (John 19:10) (Fig. 5 - with the word for 'power', 'authority' highlighted twice). But, as we will see later, he had no such powers: a power that only belongs to God, according to the early-Christian exegetic tradition.

He might command to release Jesus. He had the powers to acquit him of any accusations. But he didn't. He decided to fulfil the will of the roaring Jews. Out of fear. For, they said, «if thou let this man go, thou art not the friend of Caesar: whosoever maketh himself a king speaketh against Caesar» (John 19:12).

«And Pilate gave sentence that it should be as they required» (Luke 23:24). «Then Pilate delivered him therefore unto them to be crucified. And they took Jesus, and led him away» (John 19:16).

This indelible stain will mark Pilate's memory forever. And his figure, standing out from history, will always be remembered with the few powerful traits depicted in the Gospel of Matthew:

«When Pilate saw that he could prevail nothing, but that rather a tumult was made, he took water, and washed his hands before the multitude, saying, I am innocent of the blood of this just person: see ye to it» (Matthew 27:24).

Thus, in his cowardice, «Pilate, willing to content the people, [...] delivered Jesus [...] to be crucified» (Mark 15:15).

But when pressure on him lessens, Pontius Pilate regains his distinguishing traits and habits, which we already know from Philo and Josephus. So he does not miss the opportunity to show his nasty, sadistic penchant: «And Pilate wrote a title, and put it on the cross. And the writing was, 'Jesus of Nazareth the King of the Jews'» (John 19:19).

This is a reference to the most famous 'Titulus Crucis' ('Title of the Cross'), the written piece of wood that was placed on the top of the Cross by the Roman soldiers, by the order of Pilate himself. The wood which is traditionally believed to be possibly this original artifact is currently preserved at the Church of Santa Croce in Gerusalemme in Rome (Fig. 6).

According to the Gospel of John, at this point Pilate is still capable of a last, useless stand inspired to firmness and uprightness: when the Jews ask him to take that inappropriate, nonsensical writing off, he drily replies to them «What I have written I have written» (John 19:22) (Fig. 7). This will be the only sign of dauntlessness shown by Pilate in the whole affair.

Here ends our overview of the most ancient literary tradition concerning the figure of the fifth Roman prefect of Judaea.

However, a question still remains: what has it all got to do with a small lake sitting within the glacial cirque of a mountainous chain in Italy? What has this story to do with the Sibillini Mountain Range?

To find the link, we still have to illustrate the heritage left by Pontius Pilate to the subsequent ages. A heritage of contempt and repugnance.

And curse.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /8. L'uomo che lasciò morire Gesù
«Uscì dunque Pilato verso di loro e domandò: 'Che accusa portate contro quest'uomo?'» (Fig. 1).

È questa la prima frase pronunciata da Ponzio Pilato al suo apparire nel racconto contenuto nel Vangelo di Giovanni (18:29). Gesù Cristo si trova in piedi, di fronte al prefetto, dopo la sua cattura da parte dei giudei. Questi stanno tentando, con agitato tumulto, di convincere il governatore romano a pronunciare una condanna, e una condanna a morte.

Pilato comincia a interrogare Gesù, ma non può che constatare, dichiarandolo apertamente, di non riuscire a trovare «in lui nessuna colpa» (Giovanni 18:38). Posto sotto evidente pressione, egli tenta di soddisfare il desiderio di sangue della folla ordinando la flagellazione di Gesù. Ma questo non è abbastanza per la moltitudine: quando il prefetto si rivolge agli ebrei rumoreggianti dicendo «Ecco, io ve lo conduco fuori, perché sappiate che non trovo in lui nessuna colpa» (Giovanni 19:4), essi gli rispondono gridando di crocifiggere quel prigioniero.

Possiamo leggere queste parole, pronunciate da Pilato, così come esse appaiono nei fogli 1377 e 1378 dell'antichissimo Codex Vaticanus (Vat. Gr. 1209), conservato presso la Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, un preziosissimo manoscritto del quarto secolo contenente il più risalente esemplare dei Vangeli, presentati nella loro versione originale in lingua greca (Fig. 2).

Ora Pilato viene a trovarsi coinvolto in un frangente assai critico. E sappiamo, da Flavio Giuseppe e Filone d'Alessandria, che quando egli comincia a essere messo alle strette, i tratti sanguinari del prefetto di Roma tendono a manifestarsi con minore intensità, ed egli inizia ad assumere un atteggiamento esitante.

Il governatore prova allora a disfarsi di quel caso, rivolgendosi ai capi degli ebrei nel modo seguente: «prendetelo voi e crocifiggetelo; io non trovo in lui nessuna colpa» (Giovanni 19:6), dichiarando così per la terza volta come egli ritenga che a carico di Gesù non sussista alcun motivo perché la legge debba perseguirlo.

Ma la reazione è furiosa, e il prefetto romano «ebbe ancora più paura» (Giovanni 19:8) (Fig. 3).

Pilato ha paura, e possiamo leggere questa fondamentale parola, in lingua greca, ingrandita nella figura. Egli teme gravi conseguenze per la propria autorità e la propria personale sicurezza, nel caso non dovesse cedere alle pressanti richieste degli ebrei e dei loro capi. In questa difficile situazione, egli pronuncia le famose parole «Che cos'è la verità?» (Giovanni 18:38) (Fig. 4); non si tratta affatto, però, di una domanda da filosofo, ma solo di un espediente, un tentativo per guadagnare ulteriore tempo, pensando e ripensando in cuor suo quale possa essere la via d'uscita che possa condurlo fuori da questo assai pericoloso frangente.

È questo il momento specifico e fondamentale in cui, secondo un'antica tradizione, Ponzio Pilato viene caricato della sua gravissima, fatale, imperdonabile colpa: egli cede alle richieste degli ebrei, e accetta di procedere con l'esecuzione di Gesù Cristo, il Figlio di Dio.

Egli stesso pronuncia le parole che segneranno il suo personale destino per i secoli a venire: «Non sai che ho il potere di metterti in libertà e il potere di metterti in croce?» (Giovanni 19:10) (Fig. 5 - con la parola greca per 'potere', 'autorità' evidenziata due volte). Ma, come avremo modo di vedere in seguito, egli non dispone affatto di questo potere: potere che appartiene, secondo la tradizione esegetica protocristiana, solamente a Dio.

Pilato avrebbe potuto impartire l'ordine di liberare Gesù. Egli aveva certamente il potere di assolverlo da ogni accusa. Ma non lo fece. Decise invece di cedere alla volontà della turbolenta moltitudine giudea. Per paura. Perché, gli fu detto, «se liberi costui, non sei amico di Cesare. Chiunque infatti si fa re si mette contro Cesare» (Giovanni 19:12).

E così «Pilato allora decise che la loro richiesta fosse eseguita» (Luca 23:24). «Allora lo consegnò loro perché fosse crocifisso. Essi allora presero Gesù» (Giovanni 19:16-17).

Questa macchia indelebile lorderà per sempre la memoria di Pilato. La sua figurà rimarrà scolpita nella Storia con quei singoli, potenti tratti rappresentati nel Vangelo di Matteo:

«Pilato, visto che non otteneva nulla, anzi che il tumulto cresceva sempre più, presa dell'acqua, si lavò le mani davanti alla folla: 'Non sono responsabile, disse, di questo sangue: vedetevela voi'» (Matteo 27:24).

E dunque, nella propria codardia, «Pilato, volendo dar soddisfazione alla moltitudine [...], lo consegnò [Gesù] perché fosse crocifisso» (Marco 15:15).

Ma quando la pressione sul prefetto diminuisce, Ponzio Pilato recupera i propri atteggiamenti più tipici, a noi già ben noti grazie ai brani di Filone d'Alessandria e Flavio Giuseppe. Egli, infatti, non trascura l'opportunità di dare spazio, ancora una volta, al lato perverso della propria personalità: «Pilato compose anche l'iscrizione e la fece porre sulla croce; vi era scritto: 'Gesù il Nazareno, il re dei Giudei'» (Giovanni 19:19).

Si tratta di un riferimento al notissimo 'Titulus Crucis', l'insegna lignea che fu posta dai soldati romani sulla parte più alta della Croce, per ordine dello stesso Pilato. Ciò che tradizionalmente si ritiene possa forse essere questa antica reliquia è oggi conservato presso la Basilica di Santa Croce in Gerusalemme, a Roma (Fig. 6).

Come riferito dal Vangelo di Giovanni, sembra, a questo punto, che Pilato essere ancora capace di un ultimo, inutile anelito ispirato a fermezza e dignità: quando i giudei gli chiedono di rimuovere quella scritta inappropriata e inverosimile, egli risponde seccamente «Ciò che ho scritto, ho scritto» (Giovanni 19:22) (Fig. 7). Sarà questo l'unico segno di ardimento mostrato da Pilato nel corso dell'intera vicenda.

Termina proprio qui la nostra ricapitolazione relativa alla più antica tradizione letteraria concernente la figura del quinto prefetto romano della Giudea.

Ma cosa ha a che fare, tutto questo, con un piccolo lago annidato all'interno di un circo glaciale situato presso una catena montuosa in Italia? Qual è il legame di tutta questa storia con il massiccio dei Monti Sibillini?

Per comprendere quale sia questo legame, dobbiamo ancora procedere a illustrare l'eredità che Ponzio Pilato ha lasciato alle epoche successive. Un'eredità di disprezzo e condanna.

E di dannazione.

















































































4 May 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /7. An uncompromising portrait of the governor of Judaea
In 1961, an Italian archeologist, Antonio Frova, who was carrying out an excavation campaign at the ancient site of Caesarea Maritima, Israel, unearthed a stone bearing an utmostly rare fragmentary inscription (Fig. 1):

«To the Divine Augusti Tiberieum - Pontius Pilate - Prefect of Judaea - Made and dedicated this».

[In the original Latin text: «[Dis Augusti]S Tiberieum - [Po]ntius Pilatus - [Praef]ectus Iuda[ea]e - [fecit d]e[dicavit]»].

This is the only archeological evidence of the historical existence of Pontius Pilatus, the prefect of the Roman province of Judaea.

After 6 A.D., Judaea, together with the territories of Samaria and Idumaea, began to be subject to direct Roman rule, its capital being Caesarea Maritima, and the power being exercised by a prefect chosen within the ranks of the equestrian order (Fig. 2).

According to historians, between 26 A.D. and 36 A.D. the fifth prefect of Judaea was Pontius Pilate, while, in Rome, Tiberius Caesar was Emperor.

On the origins and family of Pontius Pilatus, ancient sources provide no details, even though according to tradition he may possibly have been born in the Italian region of Abruzzo. Certainly enough, his name and office are explicitly mentioned by many non-Christian historians, providing full historical solidity to a figure who is mainly known, after the Gospels, for his crucial role in the Passion of Jesus Christ.

First-century Roman-Jewish historian Flavius Josephus, in his “The Jewish War” (Book II, folia 90-91 of the precious manuscript Grec 1425 preserved at the Bibliothèque Nationale de France, dating to the eleventh century) portrays a careless, insensitive Pilate, stirring heedlessly up the rage of the Jews subject to his rule by performing acts which were seen as an attack to the local religion and customs (Fig. 3):

«Pilate, being sent by Tiberius as procurator to Judaea, introduced into Jerusalem by night and under cover the effigies of Caesar which are called standards. This proceeding, when day broke, aroused immense excitement among the Jews [... as their laws] permit no image to be erected in the city. Hastening after Pilate to Caesarea, the Jews implored him to remove the standards from Jerusalem and to uphold the laws of their ancestors. [...] Pilate refused».

At all appearances, Pilatus also had a taste for vicious, dramatic effects, because what he did in this predicament did not certainly gained to him the approval of the ruled people:

«On the ensuing day Pilate took his seat on his tribunal in the great stadium and summoning the multitude, with the apparent intention of answering them, gave the arranged signal to his armed soldiers to surround the Jews. Finding themselves in a ring of troops, three deep, the Jews were struck dumb at the unexpected sight. Pilate, after threatening to cut them down, if they refused to admit Caesar's images, signalled to the soldiers to draw their swords».

Only when the Jews swore that they would rather die than transgress their own laws, Pilate stood in astonishment, and then complied with their request, so that the Emperor's images were removed from Jerusalem (Fig. 4, with the Greek words for 'Pilate' and 'Jerusalem' highlighted).

On another occasion, narrated by the same Josephus, he robbed the Jews' sacred treasure held in the Temple with the purpose to build an aqueduct. Angry people gathered threateningly around his palace in Jerusalem, where he had come on a visit from Caesarea. Once again, he devised a plan he must have thought to be a nasty trick, cruel enough to satisfy his sadistic penchant (Book II):

«He, foreseeing the tumult, had interspersed among the crowd a troop of his soldiers, armed but disguised in civilian dress, with orders not to use their swords, but to beat any rioters with cudgels. He now from his tribunal gave the agreed signal. Large numbers of the Jews perished, some from the blows which they received, others trodden to death by their companions in the ensuing flight. Cowed by the fate of the victims, the multitude was reduced to silence».

The portrait of Pontius Pilate provided by Flavius Josephus must not have been so distant from truth, if we consider that a hint to another forgotten massacre is contained in the Gospels themselves, in which we found a short sentence briefly mentioning «the Galilaeans, whose blood Pilate had mingled with their sacrifices» (Luke 13:1), possibly referring to pilgrims carelessly slain by the Romans at the Temple in Jerusalem. And a similar description of the mean Roman prefect can be found in another ancient writer as well: Philo of Alexandria.

Philo was a Jewish author and philosopher who lived in Alexandria, Egypt, in the first century of the Chistian era. In his “Legatio ad Gaium” (Chapter XXXVIII) Philo reports a similar episode, possibly the same described by Josephus, which confirms and deepens the outline of Pilate's wicked, cowardly figure (Fig. 5):

«Pilate was one of the emperor's lieutenants, having been appointed governor of Judaea. He, not more with the object of doing honour to Tiberius than with that of vexing the multitude, dedicated some gilt shields in the palace of Herod, in the holy city [Jerusalem]».

Again, Philo of Alexandria narrates of a Roman prefect who finds it pleasurable to challenge his subjects and arouse their anger. The most noble representatives of the Jewish people raised a formal grievance against this offence to local laws and customs. However, «he steadfastly refused this petition, for he was a man of a very inflexible disposition, and very merciless as well as very obstinate».

This is the point when the Jews strike a false note, which simply enflames the wrath of Pilate:

«Sure enough Emperor Tiberius is not desirous that any of our laws or customs shall be destroyed. And if you yourself say that he is, show us either some command from him, or some letter, or something of the kind, that we, who have been sent to you as ambassadors, may cease to trouble you, and may address our supplications directly to your master».

There is nothing worse with a powerful man exercising his power in an inappropriate way than to threaten to appeal to his higher-rank supervisor: this menace «exasperated him to the greatest possible degree», as he feared that they might report to Tiberius a comprehensive account of all his robberies, abuses and unlawful behaviour. However, he was just too coward to decide a firm course of action - by the way, just the very same approach he will adopt when confronting with the case of a certain Jesus Christ:

«Therefore, being exceedingly angry, and being at all times a man of most ferocious passions, he was in great perplexity, neither venturing to take down what he had once set up, nor wishing to do any thing which could be acceptable to his subjects, and at the same time being sufficiently acquainted with the firmness of Tiberius on these points».

But the Jews were much more determined than he was: they resolved to tighten their hold on Pilate, by addressing «a most supplicatory letter to Tiberius».

And results began to flow in (Fig. 6):

«When Tiberius had read the letter, what did he say of Pilate, and what threats did he utter against him! [...] How very angry he was [...] Immediately, without putting any thing off till the next day, he wrote a letter, reproaching and reviling him in the most bitter manner for his act of unprecedented audacity, and commanding him immediately to take down the shields». And the shields were taken down.

So, according to a classical literary tradition, Pontius Pilate, the fifth prefect of Judaea, was not a reliable direct report. As a subordinate official, holding a high-level post as resident ruler and representative of the Emperor of Rome in a small, remote province, he was cause for concerns owing to his careless behaviour, wholly indifferent to the feelings and whishes of his subjects, turbulent as they were. And he sparked turmoil, and unwanted discontent.

This scenario is further confirmed by another excerpt taken from Flavius Josephus. In his “Antiquities of the Jews”, written at the end of the first century, he narrates of a man from Samaria, a region set between Judaea and Galilee, who publicly alleged that he could unearth the ancient, sacred vessels which were buried by Moses himself under the top of a local mount, called Gerizim. The Samaritans gathered in excitement at a nearby village, the crowd ready to ascend the mount to see the holy vessels.

But Pilate, in full contempt of their expectations and religious beliefs, devised to play one of his usual cruel tricks on them (Book XVIII, Chapter V):

«Pilate prevented their going up, by seizing upon the roads with a great band of horsemen and footmen, who fell upon those that were gotten together in the village; and when it came to an action, some of them they slew, and others of them they put to flight, and took a great many alive, the principal of whom, and also the most potent of those that fled away, Pilate ordered to be slain».

Of course, this brutal way of conducting public order's management in the province was not appreciated by his subjects, and they did not refrain from escalating the matter to Rome's upper political level (Fig. 7):

«After that, the Samaritan noblemen sent an embassy to Vitellius, who [...] was now the governor of Syria, and accused Pilate of the murder of those that were killed, out of the fact that they did not go to the village in order to revolt from the Romans, but to escape the violence of Pilate».

The resulting effect of this most legitimate protest was that Pilate was ordered «to go to Rome, to answer before the Emperor to the accusations of the Jews». Therefore, he «made haste to Rome, and this in obedience to the orders of Vitellius, which he dared not contradict». He never returned to Judaea. He had been in charge of Judaea «for ten years», says Josephus, and he had just enough luck to avoid the Emperor's punishment, only because «before he could get to Rome, Tiberius was dead». This occurred in 37 A.D.

Pontius Pilate, coward and cruel as he was, did not prove to be a fit manager of the interests of Rome in a far-off province. He showed a positive tendency to the creation of discontent and commotion amid the populations subject to Roman rule. Philo of Alexandria adds a few effective words to describe the vile and inadequate prefect (“Legatio ad Gaium”, Chapter XXXVIII - Fig. 8):

«He feared lest they [the Jews] might in reality go on an embassy to the Emperor, and might reveal some particulars of his government, in respect of his felonies, trade of sentences, and his rapine, and his habit of insulting people, and his massacres, and tortures, and his continual murders of people untried and uncondemned, and his most grievous cruelty».

According to Josephus, he was also undecided when things went bad, and desirous to retrace his own steps to avoid further troubles, as «he was inclined to change his mind as to what he had done, but that he was not willing to be thought to do so».

That was Pontius Pilate: a mediocre man, whose name History would not celebrate nor remember at all, if not out of the few excerpts written on him by Philo of Alexandria and Flavius Josephus, and a handful of words recorded on a slab of stone found in a second-rank excavation site in Palestine.

However, History does remember the name of Pontius Pilate.

Because he played a primary, undisputed role in the Passion of Jesus Christ: a fateful event (Fig. 9) that took place «in the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar, Pontius Pilate being governor of Judaea, and Herod being tetrarch of Galilee» (Luke 3:1).

Pontius Pilate. A character who, in a most critical predicament whose tale will be told and told again across the centuries to come, will stage any and all of his most despicable qualities, as described by Philo and Josephus: cruelty, straightforward cowardice, a proclivity for hesitation, a nasty sense of humour.

But we also have other fundamental information. In the next article, we will read the words written in a true, first-rank primary source. A source which mentions Pontius Pilate in his role as a Roman Empire's official fully bestowed with plenary powers and authority.

We are going to open the pages of the Gospels, and read about the deeds of Pilate, the fifth Roman prefect of Judaea.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /7. Un ritratto senza compromessi del governatore della Giudea
Nel 1961, un archeologo italiano, Antonio Frova, durante una campagna di scavi condotta presso l'antico sito di Caesarea Maritima, in Israele, disseppellì dalla terra una pietra che recava una rarissima iscrizione frammentaria (Fig. 1):

«Al divino Augusto Tiberio - Ponzio Pilato - Prefetto della Giudea - fece e dedicò questa iscrizione».

[Nel testo originale latino: «[Dis Augusti]S Tiberieum - [Po]ntius Pilatus - [Praef]ectus Iuda[ea]e - [fecit d]e[dicavit]»].

È questa la sola conferma archeologica dell'esistenza storica di Ponzio Pilato, prefetto della provincia romana della Giudea.

Successivamente all'anno 6 d.C., la Giudea, assieme ai territori di Samaria e Idumea, divenne soggetta al dominio diretto di Roma, con capitale stabilita a Caesarea Maritima, il potere essendo esercitato da un prefetto appartenente all'ordine equestre (Fig. 2).

Secondo gli storici, tra il 26 d.C. e il 36 d.C. il quinto prefetto della Giudea fu Ponzio Pilato, mentre a Roma imperatore era Tiberio Cesare .

Le fonti antiche non forniscono alcun dettaglio a proposito delle origini familiari di Ponzio Pilato, benché secondo alcune tradizioni egli potrebbe essere nato in Abruzzo. Ciò che è indubitabile è che il suo nome e la sua carica sono esplicitamente citati da diversi autori non cristiani, attestando così la piena solidità storica di una figura che è principalmente conosciuta, grazie ai Vangeli, per il ruolo cruciale interpretato negli eventi della Passione di Gesù Cristo.

Lo storico romano di origine ebraica Flavio Giuseppe, vissuto nel primo secolo, nella sua "Guerra giudaica" (Libro II, folia 90-91 del prezioso manoscritto Grec 1425 conservato presso la Bibliothèque Nationale de France, risalente all'undicesimo secolo) ci tramanda l'immagine di un cinico, noncurante Pilato, che scatena con indifferenza le ire del popolo ebraico, a lui soggetto, con azioni interpretate come un attacco alla religione e alle tradizioni locali (Fig. 3):

«Pilato, essendo stato inviato da Tiberio come procuratore della Giudea, fece introdurre nascostamente a Gerusalemme, di notte, le immagini di Cesare denominate insegne. Questa azione, al fare del giorno, suscitò grande costernazione tra i giudei [... in quanto le loro leggi] non permettevano che delle immagini fossero innalzate all'interno della città. Si affrettarono allora da Pilato a Cesarea, e lo pregarono di far rimuovere quelle insegne da Gerusalemme, riaffermando così le leggi dei loro antenati. [...] Ma Pilato rifiutò».

A quanto pare, Pilato aveva anche un gusto maligno per gli effetti drammatici, perché ciò che egli decise in questa occasione non gli guadagnò di certo il favore del popolo da lui governato:

«Il giorno seguente, Pilato si mostrò sul suo scranno presso il tribunale posto nel grande stadio e, dopo avere convocato la moltitudine, con l'apparente intenzione di fornire al popolo una risposta, diede il segnale convenuto alle sue truppe in armi affinché circondassero i giudei. Trovandosi accerchiati da un anello di soldati, la gente rimase ammutolita a causa di quanto stava inaspettatamente accadendo. Pilato, dopo averli minacciati tutti di morte, se essi si fossero rifiutati di accettare le immagini di Cesare, diede ordine ai suoi uomini di sguainare le spade».

Solo dopo che gli ebrei ebbero giurato che avrebbero preferito morire piuttosto che trasgredire alle proprie leggi, Pilato ne rimase finalmente colpito, e decise infine di accondiscendere alle loro richieste, rimuovendo così da Gerusalemme le contestate immagini dell'imperatore (Fig. 4, con le parole greche 'Pilato' e 'Gerusalemme' poste in evidenza).

In un'altra occasione, narrataci dallo stesso Flavio Giuseppe, egli depredò il sacro tesoro conservato all'interno del Tempio e appartenente al popolo ebraico, con l'obiettivo di utilizzare quella ricchezza per costruire un acquedotto. Il popolo in rivolta si radunò minacciosamente attorno al suo palazzo di Gerusalemme, presso il quale egli si trovava in quel momento, essendo venuto in visita da Cesarea. Ancora una volta, egli escogitò un piano architettato come un malvagio scherzo, sufficientemente crudele da alimentare in modo adeguato le sue sadiche inclinazioni (Libro II):

«Egli, prevedendo il tumulto, aveva fatto confondere tra la folla truppe appartenenti alla sua guardia, armati ma travestiti da civili, con l'ordine di non fare uso delle spade, ma di picchiare violentemente i rivoltosi con pesanti bastoni. Poi, dal suo tribunale, egli lanciò il segnale convenuto. Moltissimi giudei perirono quel giorno, alcuni a causa dei colpi ricevuti, altri calpestati a morte dai propri compagni nella calca terrorizzata che ne seguì. Atterriti dal destino delle vittime, la moltitudine fu così ridotta al silenzio».

Il ritratto di Ponzio Pilato tratteggiato da Flavio Giuseppe non deve essere stato così distante dal vero, se consideriamo come un accenno a un altro massacro dimenticato sia contenuto anche nei Vangeli, nei quali si rinviene una breve frase che menziona «quei Galilei, il cui sangue Pilato aveva mescolato con quello dei loro sacrifici» (Luca, 13:1), probabilmente riferita a pellegrini trucidati con disprezzo dai romani nel Tempio di Gerusalemme. E una descrizione non molto diversa, ancora concernente il brutale prefetto romano, può essere rinvenuta anche in un ulteriore autore classico: Filone d'Alessandria.

Filone fu uno scrittore e filosofo ebreo che visse ad Alessandria d'Egitto nel primo secolo dell'era cristiana. Nella sua "Legatio ad Gaium" (Capitolo XXXVIII), Filone riferisce un episodio simile, forse il medesimo già descritto da Flavio Giuseppe, confermando e approfondendo il ritratto di Pilato come una figura maligna e codarda (Fig. 5):

«Pilato era uno dei luogotenenti dell'imperatore, essendo stato nominato governatore della Giudea. Egli, con lo scopo non solamente di rendere onore a Tiberio, ma anche con l'obiettivo di schiacciare il popolo, dedicò alcuni scudi dorati all'interno del palazzo di Erode, nella città santa [Gerusalemme]».

Ancora una volta, Filone d'Alessandria ci narra di un prefetto romano che trova divertente sfidare il popolo a lui soggetto, suscitandone la rabbia. I più nobili rappresentanti del popolo ebraico sollevarono una formale protesta contro quell'offesa agli usi e alle leggi locali. Nondimeno, «egli rigettò recisamente le loro richieste, perché Pilato era un uomo testardo e inflessibile, senza alcuna pietà e assai ostinato».

È a questo punto che gli ebrei pronunciano le parole sbagliate, le quali non fanno che scatenare l'ira di Pilato:

«Di certo l'imperatore Tiberio non desidera affatto che alcuna delle nostre leggi o tradizioni possa essere calpestata. E se tu, o Pilato, ritieni che invece egli voglia così, mostraci un ordine che sia stato emesso dall'imperatore, o qualche lettera, o qualsiasi disposizione del genere, in modo che noi, che siamo stati inviati a te come ambasciatori, possiamo cessare di arrecarti disturbo, e possiamo rivolgere le nostre richieste direttamente a chi ti è superiore».

Non c'è nulla di peggiore, di fronte a un uomo potente che sta esercitando le proprie prerogative in modo inappropriato, del rivolgergli la minaccia di appellarsi al suo superiore e supervisore di rango più elevato: questa provocazione «lo esasperò al massimo grado possibile», temendo egli che essi potessero riferire a Tiberio un completo resoconto riguardante tutte le sue ruberie, i suoi abusi e i suoi comportamenti illegittimi. Pilato, però, era semplicemente troppo vigliacco per stabilire una linea d'azione ferma e determinata - non a caso, la stessa modalità di approccio che egli adotterà quando dovrà confrontarsi con il caso di un certo Gesù Cristo:

«A questo punto, essendosi oltremodo adirato, ed essendo in ogni occasione un uomo dalle più feroci passioni, egli si trovò in grande difficoltà, non potendo decidersi né a cedere in merito a ciò che egli aveva già stabilito, né essendo in alcun modo desideroso di compiere alcuna cosa che fosse gradita ai suoi sudditi, ed essendo comunque sufficientemente edotto della fermezza di Tiberio in merito a questioni del genere».

Ma gli ebrei erano assai più determinati di quanto non lo fosse lui: decisero infatto di stringere la loro presa su Pilato, indirizzando «un'accorata lettera di supplica a Tiberio».

E i risultati non tardarono ad arrivare (Fig. 6):

«Quando Tiberio ebbe letto la lettera, cosa non disse di Pilato, e quali minacce non pronunziò l'imperatore nei suoi confronti! [...] Si infuriò grandemente [...] Subito, senza attendere nemmeno un giorno, egli scrisse una lettera, rimproverandolo e insultandolo nel modo più aspro per la sua azione dall'audacia mai vista prima, ordinandogli di rimuovere immediatamente quegli scudi». E gli scudi furono rimossi.

Dunque, secondo una tradizione letteraria risalente all'antichità, Ponzio Pilato, il quinto prefetto della Giudea, non si distinse affatto come un sottoposto particolarmente affidabile. Nella sua qualità di funzionario subordinato, occupante una posizione di rilievo in qualità di governatore residente, in rappresentanza dell'imperatore di Roma, presso una piccola, remota provincia, egli fu causa di inconvenienti e preoccupazioni a motivo del suo comportamento noncurante, del tutto indifferente ai sentimenti e a alle necessità delle popolazioni a lui soggette, tra l'altro alquanto turbolente. Dando così adito a disordini e a indesiderato malcontento.

Questo scenario trova ulteriore conferma in un altro brano tratto da Flavio Giuseppe. Nel suo "Antichità giudaiche", risalente alla fine del primo secolo, egli ci narra di un uomo originario della Samaria, una regione posta tra Giudea e Galilea, il quale asseriva pubblicamente di essere in grado di dissotterrare gli antichi contenitori sacri che furono seppelliti dallo stesso Mosè sotto la cima di un locale rilievo, chiamato Gerizim. I samaritani si radunarono con eccitazione presso un vicino villaggio, la folla pronta ad ascendere quel monte per vedere quei sacri vasi.

Ma Pilato, nel totale disprezzo di ogni loro aspettazione e credenza religiosa, decise di giocare loro uno dei suoi trucchi tipicamente crudeli (Libro XVIII, Capitolo V):

«Pilato impedì che essi salissero sulla montagna, occupando le strade con una nutrita schiera di uomini sia a piedi che a cavallo; i suoi soldati piombarono su coloro che si erano radunati nel villaggio, e quando le operazioni ebbero inizio, molti samaritani furono uccisi e molti altri messi in fuga; e molti altri furono catturati vivi, tra i quali i più illustri e importanti furono massacrati per ordine di Pilato».

Naturalmente, questo modo estremamente brutale di gestire l'ordine pubblico nella provincia non fu affatto apprezzato dalla popolazione locale, ed essi non tralasciarono di rivolgersi direttamente al successivo livello gerarchico del potere di Roma (Fig. 7):

«Dopo questi fatti, i nobili Samaritani inviarono un'ambasciata a Vitellio, che [...] era in quel momento il governatore della Siria, e accusarono Pilato dell'assassinio di coloro che erano stati uccisi, perché questi non si erano recati in quel villaggio per iniziare una rivolta contro i Romani, ma avevano solo tentato di sfuggire alla furia di Pilato».

Il risultato di questa assai legittima protesta fu che a Pilato fu ordinato «di recarsi a Roma per rispondere, di fronte all'imperatore, delle accuse presentate dai Giudei». Perciò egli «si affrettò a Roma, e questo al fine di obbedire all'ordine di Vitellio, che egli non osava contraddire». Pilato non ritornò mai più in Giudea. Egli era stato responsabile della Giudea «per dieci anni», racconta Flavio Giuseppe, e fu ancora abbastanza fortunato da riuscire a sfuggire alla punizione dell'imperatore, ma solo perché «prima che egli potesse giungere a Roma, Tiberio era morto». Tutto ciò ebbe luogo nel 37 d.C.

Ponzio Pilato, codardo e crudele quale egli fu, aveva dimostrato di non essere affatto un abile gestore degli interessi di Roma in quelle lontane province. Egli aveva manifestato una sensibile tendenza alla creazione di fermento e malcontento tra le popolazioni soggette al dominio di Roma. Filone d'Alessandria aggiunge alcune efficaci parole che bene illustrano i tratti di quell'abietto e inadeguato prefetto ("Legatio ad Gaium", Capitolo XXXVIII - Fig. 8):

«Egli temette che essi [i giudei] potessere effettivamente recarsi in ambasciata presso l'imperatore, e potessero rivelare alcune particolarità del suo modo di governare, riferendo a proposito dei gravi reati da lui commesssi, del commercio di sentenze, delle sue estorsioni, della sua abitudine di offendere le popolazioni locali, e anche dei massacri da lui compiuti, e delle torture, e delle continue uccisioni di persone mai giudicate né condannate, e, infine, della sua crudeltà perversa e smodata».

Secondo Flavio Giuseppe, egli fu anche incerto e titubante quando le cose tendevano a mettersi male, e spesso desideroso di rimangiarsi le proprie decisioni per evitare ulteriori problemi, essendo egli «propenso a mutar di parere a proposito di ciò che aveva già fatto, non volendo però che gli altri pensassero che stesse cambiando idea».

Fu questo, Ponzio Pilato: un uomo mediocre, il cui nome non sarebbe mai stato celebrato né ricordato dalla Storia, se non per i pochi passaggi scritti su di lui da Filone d'Alessandria e Flavio Giuseppe, e per una manciata di parole registrate su di una lastra di pietra disseppellita presso un sito di scavo di secondaria importanza in Palestina.

Eppure, la Storia ricorda bene il nome di Ponzio Pilato.

Perché egli interpretò un ruolo primario, fondamentale nella Passione di Gesù Cristo: un evento fatidico (Fig. 9) che si verificò «nell'anno decimoquinto dell'impero di Tiberio Cesare, mentre Ponzio Pilato era governatore della Giudea ed Erode tetrarca della Galilea» (Luca 3:1).

Ponzio Pilato. Un personaggio che, nel corso di eventi critici il cui racconto sarebbe stato narrato e narrato ancora per i secoli a venire, metterà in scena ognuna delle sue peggiori qualità, così come descritte da Filone d'Alessandria e Flavio Giuseppe: crudeltà, vera e propria codardia, una tendenza all'esitazione, un perverso senso dell'umorismo.

Ma, a nostra disposizione, abbiamo anche ulteriori informazioni. Nel prossimo articolo, andremo a leggere le parole riportate nell'ambito di una fonte primaria e di assoluto rilievo. Una fonte che riferisce il nome di Ponzio Pilato nel suo ruolo di funzionario di elevato grado dell'Impero Romano, nella pienezza dei suoi poteri e della sua autorità.

Stiamo per andare ad aprire le pagine dei Vangeli. Stiamo per andare a leggere il racconto delle gesta di Pilato, il quinto prefetto romano della Giudea.
































































































































29 Apr 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /6. The many resting places of the governor of Judaea
In our previous articles, we have perused the pages of “The Paradise of Queen Sibyl”, a fifteenth-century work by Antoine de la Sale which presents the legendary tale of the death of Pontius Pilate, the Roman prefect of Judaea, and his burial into a small lake set amid the Sibillini Mountain Range, in which his body was thrown. A lake that became a place of black magic and necromancy, and whose name is connected still today to that of Pilate (Fig. 1).

Why did a legend concerning the renowned Roman prefect who sentenced Jesus Christ to death settle in this very corner of central Italy, having at all appearances nothing to do with any of the events narrated in the Gospels?

To find it out, let's continue our reading of ancient clues contained in further manuscripts. Here is a second story which might be of interest to us (Fig. 2):

«And about Pontius Pilate it is written, in the 'Beheading of St. John the Baptist', that after having been accused by the Jews to be the infamy of his kindred, he was exiled to Lyon in order to be sentenced; there, he was sentenced to starvation. And in that same place where he was born it is said that he killed himself out of grief. Others say that in Lyon he was condemned to be hanged, and he was actually hanged in Vienne; still in the church of the Holy Mary, an iron hook is shown to which people say he was suspended».

[In the original Latin text: «Et de Pontyo Pilato dicitur, in decollatione sancti Johannis Baptiste, quod accusatus a Judeis in obproprium sui generis mittitur apud Lugdunum in exilium dampnandus, ubi, ut dicitur, dampnatus est sic ut nihil comederet. Qui ibidem ubi oriundus fuerat, ut dicitur, pre dolore se occidit. Alii dicunt quod Lugduni suspendio adjudicatus et apud Viennam est suspensus et ostenditur adhuc ibi, in ecclesia beate Marie, uncus ferreus in quo dicitur fuisse suspensus»].

This is a further tale on the death of Pontius Pilate which is found in Stephen of Bourbon's “Tractatus de diversis materiis predicabilibus”, written in the first half of the thirteenth century. In Part I “De timore” (“On fear”), Section VII “De timore mortis” (“On the fear of death”), as it appears in manuscript Latin 15970 preserved at the Bibliothèque Nationale de France at folium 180r, the preacher of the Dominican order narrates of a verdict issued against Pilate, of his possible suicide or, as an alternative tale, of his hanging from a hook in Vienne, a French town set fifteen miles south of Lyon, by the great river Rhône. As we will later see, Stephen of Bourbon is making reference to another work, the “Abbreviatio in gestis et miraculis sanctorum”, in which Jean de Mailly, another Dominican preacher, mentions Pilate's exile while illustrating the story of St. John the Baptist.

However, Stephen of Bourbon has something more to say. A piece of information it seems we have already heard of (Fig. 3):

«And not far from that same place, on a mount near St. Chamon, he [Pilate] was hurled into a pit; from this pit, when a stone is thrown into it, people say vapours are issued, and storms arise».

[In the original Latin text: «et ibi prope in monte supra Saint Chamon in puteo projectus; ubi, quando lapis proicitur, fumus inde egredi dicitur, de quo tempestas concitatur»].

Pontius Pilate, the prefect of the Roman province of Judaea, was thrown into a pit, or well, lying on a mount. Just like in Antoine de la Sale's account. And - as in that account - storms seem to raise from that odd resting place, into which Pilate's body was hurled.

Are we in the middle of the Sibillini Mountain Range, in Italy?

Not at all. Instead, we are in France, nor far from Lyon, on a mount raising its peak in the vicinity of Saint-Chamond, an ancient town which is set at the foot of a mountainous relief.

And the relief, still today, is called the “Massif de Pilat”: the mountain range of Pilate, whose peaks are collectively said “Mont de Pilat” (Fig. 4).

So we find ourselves with two different legendary resting plates for our most renowned prefect: the first is in Italy, and the second in France.

Isn't that enough? No, because we also have a third. In Switzerland. And the relevant description is not dissimilar from the previous two (Fig. 5):

«Pilatus [...] wrote to Tiberius that [... Jesus] had been crucified, and described to the Emperor all the miracles that He had done. Having been informed that He had really been crucified, he regretted His death [...] So he summoned Pilate to Rome. When the prefect reached Rome and reported to Tiberius on Jesus Christ's death, the Emperor put him in prison, and devised to contrive a harrowing death to have him killed. But when Pilatus knew that he was going to die because of Jesus' death, he killed himself in the prison. He was found dead and his body was thrown into the river Tiber, but the demons put the town at risk with his corpse. For this reason Tiberius had his body taken off the river and brought near Amona [Vienne], where he was thrown into the river Rhône. But there, too, the demons raised many storms and hail around his corpse».

[In the original Latin text: «Pilatus [...] rescripsit Tiberio [... Ihesum] esse crucifixum, et cetera aliqua de miraculis que per eum facta sunt. Audiens vero Tiberius [...] illum crucifixisse, doluit de morte eius [...] Direxerat enim ad Pilatum, ut ad se veniret Romam. Qui dum Romam venisset et de morte Christi per eum Tiberius informatus esset, Pilatum incarceravit, volens excogitare mortem turpissimam, qua eum occideret. Intelligens vero Pilatus propter mortem Ihesu se moriturum, se in carcere interfecit, et mortuus repertus in Tiberim proiectus, et demones cum corpore suo multa pericula intulerunt in patria. Quare a Tiberi levatus et iuxta Amonam [Viennam] in Rodanum ductus est et projectus; ubi similiter demones multas tempestates et grandines iuxta corpus suum fecerunt»].

This description, which will experience a great diffusion, as we will later see, is included in a thirteenth-century anonymous commentary to the “Speculum regum”, written a century earlier by Godfrey of Viterbo, a secretary to Emperor Frederick I Barbarossa. The excerpt is contained in selected manuscripts bearing the “Speculum”, as reported by G. Waitz in a transcript published in 1872, from which we quote.

You may note that Pilatus' resting place, as it is mentioned in the excerpt above, is that same Vienne we already found in Stephen of Bourbon. And storms are always present, ready to rage the river's waters. However, the ancient comment proceeds further on (Fig. 6):

«The people took Pilate's body off the Rhône and, after having reached the mountains not far from Lausanne, in the proximity of Lucerne, hurled him into a marsh. And sure enough, when anybody throws an object, small as it may be, into the marsh [pit], at once storms and hail and lightnings and thunders hit the land. Therefore there are men who guard the place, especially in summers, lest any foreigners climb the mount».

[In the original Latin text: «Ideo patrioti experti de corpore Pilati, de Rodano receperunt et in montanis circa Losoniam prope Lucernam in quandam paludem proiecerunt. Et certum est, quod quandocumque aliquis homo aliquid quantumcumque parvum mittit in paludem [foveam], tunc in continenti fiunt tempestates, grandines, fulgura et tonitrua. Ideo sunt homines custodes constituti, qui tempore estatis custodiunt, ne aliquis advena ascendat»].

And here is a third resting place for Pontius Pilate: we have now reached Switzerland, and we have landed in Lucerne, together with the prefect's body. According to this version of the legend, the corpse was hurled into a marsh, or, in some manuscripts, a pit. Storms are never missing, now they rather seem to be even fiercer.

And you know what? There is a mountain which just overlooks the Swiss town of Lucerne. Its name is Tomlishorn. It is also commonly known, even in our present days, as 'Mont Pilate' (Fig. 7).

So let's try to summarise our legendary collection. We are dealing with three legends concerning the same Pontius Pilatus, the man who ordered Jesus Christ to be crucified. And we have in our hands three different burial places for our poor Roman prefect (Fig. 8).

The first one is a lake set in the Sibillini Mountain Range in Italy, as reported by Antoine de la Sale in the fifteenth century. In the lake, demons reside who can raise storms. The place is called, still today, the Lakes of Pilatus.

The second site is some sort of pit set near Lyon in France, as reported by Stephen of Bourbon in the thirteenth century. In the pit, some thing resides, and storms arise from it. The place is situated on a mountain which is called, still today, Mont de Pilat.

The third location is another pit lying near Lucerne in Switzerland, as reported by unknown thirteenth-century hands on manuscripts bearing a work by Godfrey of Viterbo. The pit contains some unknown thing, so that storms can raise from it. It is not a mere chance that the mount set by Lucerne is called, still today, Mont Pilate.

We might as well go on with further places in which Pontius Pilate would allegedly have been buried. In his “Fabularius”, Conradus de Mure, a thirteenth-century Swiss scholar, writes that the corpse of Pilate, after its usual troubled plunge «in Rodanum apud Viennam», was brought «in alpes apud montem septimum», possibly a reference to the Swiss Alps and the Septimer Pass, which connects the northern region around the Lake of Como, Italy, to Switerland (Fig. 9).

The mystery gets darker and darker, as the figure of Pontius Pilate seems to sneer at our bewilderment from the many resting places in which he lies, raising tempests from them and hiding himself beneath the icy waters of the Lakes of Pilatus in Italy.

So what to do next?

For a better understanding of the whole matter concerning Pilate, his gloomy burial sites, and the sinister legend which lives amid the Sibillini Mountain Range, the time has come to deepen our knowledge of the main character of this strange legend.

Who was Pontius Pilate?

Or, better still, who was he according to ancient literary sources? Is there any extant description of the circumstances of his death? And why would he be linked with any specific, peculiar resting place? And, finally, what is the reason for the connection between the Roman prefect and the lakes nested within the Sibillini Mountain Range?

In the next article, we are going to meet the fifth prefect of Roman-occupied Judaea. We are going to meet Pontius Pilate.

And it will be a close encounter.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /6. I molti luoghi di sepoltura del governatore della Giudea
Nei precedenti articoli, abbiamo percorso le pagine de "Il Paradiso della Regina Sibilla", opera quattrocentesca di Antoine de la Sale, nella quale viene presentato il racconto leggendario della morte di Ponzio Pilato, il prefetto romano della Giudea, e del suo luogo di sepoltura all'interno di un piccolo lago posto al centro dei Monti Sibillini: un lago nel quale il suo corpo sarebbe stato gettato, e che sarebbe divenuto un luogo di arti magiche e negromanzia, dal nome ancora oggi legato a quello di Ponzio Pilato (Fig. 1).

Come è possibile che una leggenda riguardante un celebre prefetto dell'antica Roma, colui che condannò Gesù Cristo alla morte sulla Croce, abbia potuto stabilirsi presso questo peculiare angolo dell'Italia centrale, non sussistendo in apparenza alcuna relazione tra questo luogo e gli eventi narrati nel Vangelo?

Per tentare di capire come ciò sia potuto accadere, continuiamo a ricercare ulteriori indizi negli antichi manoscritti. Ecco dunque un secondo racconto che potrebbe essere di interesse per la nostra investigazione (Fig. 2):

«E a proposito di Ponzio Pilato si dice, nella 'Decollazione di S. Giovanni Battista', che, dopo essere stato accusato dai Giudei di rappresentare l'infamia della sua schiatta, fu condannato all'esilio presso Lione, dove, si racconta, fu condannato a morire di fame. E in quello stesso luogo, nel quale egli era nato, si dice che egli si sia suicidato a causa della sua sventura. Altri raccontano che a Lione egli fu condannato a essere impiccato, ed egli fu impiccato a Vienne; lì, presso la chiesa della beata Maria, è ancora possibile vedere l'uncino di ferro al quale si dice che egli sia stato appeso».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Et de Pontyo Pilato dicitur, in decollatione sancti Johannis Baptiste, quod accusatus a Judeis in obproprium sui generis mittitur apud Lugdunum in exilium dampnandus, ubi, ut dicitur, dampnatus est sic ut nihil comederet. Qui ibidem ubi oriundus fuerat, ut dicitur, pre dolore se occidit. Alii dicunt quod Lugduni suspendio adjudicatus et apud Viennam est suspensus et ostenditur adhuc ibi, in ecclesia beate Marie, uncus ferreus in quo dicitur fuisse suspensus»].

È, questo, un ulteriore racconto che narra della morte di Ponzio Pilato, e che è rinvenibile nel "Tractatus de diversis materiis predicabilibus" di Stefano di Borbone, scritto nella prima metà del tredicesimo secolo. Nella Parte I, "De timore", Sezione VII “De timore mortis”, così come essa appare nel manoscritto Latin 15970 conservato presso la Bibliothèque Nationale de France al folium 180r, il predicatore appartenente all'ordine domenicano racconta del verdetto pronunciato contro Pilato, del suo possibile suicidio, o, come narrazione alternativa, della sua impiccagione a un gancio a Vienne, città francese situata quindici miglia a sud di Lione, sulle rive del fiume Rodano. Come avremo modo di vedere successivamente, Stefano di Borbone fa riferimento a un'altra opera, l'“Abbreviatio in gestis et miraculis sanctorum”, nella quale Jean de Mailly, un altro predicatore domenicano, menziona l'esilio di Pilato nel contesto del racconto della vicenda di San Giovanni Battista.

Ma Stefano di Borbone riferisce anche un ulteriore elemento. Un'informazione che ci sembra di avere già sentito altrove (Fig. 3):

«E lì, non distante da quei luoghi, su di una montagna prossima a Saint Chamon, egli [Pilato] fu gettato in una profonda cavità; dalla quale si racconta che, quando vi venga gettata dentro una pietra, fuoriescano vapori, e vengano suscitate tempeste».

[Nel testo originale latino: «et ibi prope in monte supra Saint Chamon in puteo projectus; ubi, quando lapis proicitur, fumus inde egredi dicitur, de quo tempestas concitatur»].

Ponzio Pilato, il prefetto della provincia romana della Giudea, fu dunque gettato in un pozzo, o abisso, posto su di una montagna. Proprio come raccontato da Antoine de la Sale. E - proprio come in quel racconto - da quello strano luogo di sepoltura, che avrebbe ospitato il corpo di Pilato, si scatenerebbero violente tempeste.

Ci troviamo forse nel mezzo dei Monti Sibillini, in Italia?

Niente affatto. Siamo, invece, in Francia, non lontano da Lione, su di una montagna che innalzerebbe la propria vetta in prossimità di Saint-Chamond, un'antica città posta ai piedi di un massiccio montuoso.

E quel massiccio, ancora oggi, è chiamato “Massif de Pilat”: le montagne di Pilato, i cui picchi sono collettivamente denominati “Mont de Pilat” (Fig. 4).

E così, ci troviamo ora con due differenti luoghi di sepoltura leggendari per il nostro illustre prefetto: il primo si trova in Italia, e il secondo in Francia.

Può bastare, tutto questo? No, perché ne abbiamo anche un terzo. In Svizzera. E la descrizione che lo riguarda non differisce in modo significativo dalle prime due (Fig. 5):

«Pilato [...] scrisse a Tiberio che [... Gesù] era stato crocifisso, e descrisse tutti i miracoli che Egli aveva compiuto. Tiberio, essendo stato informato che Egli era stato realmente crocifisso, molto si dolse della Sua morte [...] Ordinò dunque a Pilato di venire a Roma. Quando egli arrivò a Roma e rese piena informazione a Tiberio a proposito della morte di Cristo, l'imperatore lo fece gettare in carcere, e desiderò di preparare per lui una morte orribile, con la quale ucciderlo. Ma quando Pilato comprese che egli sarebbe stato posto a morte a causa della morte di Gesù, si suicidò nel carcere; e, essendo stato trovato morto, fu gettato nel Tevere, ma i demoni, usando il suo corpo, posero in pericolo la città. Per questa ragione, per ordine di Tiberio il suo cadavere fu recuperato e condotto presso Amona [Vienne], e lì gettato nel Rodano. Ma anche lì i demoni sollevarono grandi tempeste e grandini attorno al suo cadavere».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Pilatus [...] rescripsit Tiberio [... Ihesum] esse crucifixum, et cetera aliqua de miraculis que per eum facta sunt. Audiens vero Tiberius [...] illum crucifixisse, doluit de morte eius [...] Direxerat enim ad Pilatum, ut ad se veniret Romam. Qui dum Romam venisset et de morte Christi per eum Tiberius informatus esset, Pilatum incarceravit, volens excogitare mortem turpissimam, qua eum occideret. Intelligens vero Pilatus propter mortem Ihesu se moriturum, se in carcere interfecit, et mortuus repertus in Tiberim proiectus, et demones cum corpore suo multa pericula intulerunt in patria. Quare a Tiberi levatus et iuxta Amonam [Viennam] in Rodanum ductus est et projectus; ubi similiter demones multas tempestates et grandines iuxta corpus suum fecerunt»].

Questa descrizione, che conoscerà una grande diffusione, come avremo modo di vedere in seguito, è contenuta in un commento anonimo risalente al tredicesimo secolo e relativo allo "Speculum regum", scritto un secolo prima da Goffredo da Viterbo, segretario dell'imperatore Federico I Barbarossa. Il brano è contenuto in alcuni manoscritti riportati lo "Speculum", così come riferito da G. Waitz in una trascrizione pubblicata nel 1872, dalla quale traiamo il testo.

È possibile notare come il luogo di sepoltura di Pilato, così come menzionato nel brano qui citato, sia quella stessa Vienne da noi già reperita nel passaggio di Stefano di Borbone. E le tempeste sono sempre presenti, pronte ad agitare le acque del fiume. Inoltre, quel passaggio aggiunge ulteriori informazioni (Fig. 6):

«Poi la gente del luogo trasse dal Rodano il corpo di Pilato, e lo gettarono in una palude non lontano da Losanna, in prossimità di Lucerna. E pare certo che, ogni volta che qualcuno getta un oggetto, per quanto piccolo, nella palude [o pozzo], subito tempeste, grandini, folgori e tuoni si levano sulla regione. Per questo vi sono uomini che sorvegliano quel luogo, custodendolo in tempo d'estate, affinché nessuno straniero salga quella montagna».

[Nel testo originale latino: «Ideo patrioti experti de corpore Pilati, de Rodano receperunt et in montanis circa Losoniam prope Lucernam in quandam paludem proiecerunt. Et certum est, quod quandocumque aliquis homo aliquid quantumcumque parvum mittit in paludem [foveam], tunc in continenti fiunt tempestates, grandines, fulgura et tonitrua. Ideo sunt homines custodes constituti, qui tempore estatis custodiunt, ne aliquis advena ascendat»].

Ed ecco quindi il terzo luogo di sepoltura per Ponzio Pilato: abbiamo ora raggiunto la Svizzera, e siamo arrivati a Lucerna, assieme al corpo del prefetto. Secondo questa versione della leggenda, il cadavere sarebbe stato gettato in una palude o, secondo alcuni manoscritti, in una voragine. Le tempeste non mancano mai; anzi, parrebbero essersi addirittura accresciute in violenza.

E - potete immaginare? - c'è una montagna che sovrasta proprio quella città svizzera. Il suo nome è Tomlishorn. Ma è conosciuta comunemente, anche oggi, come 'Mont Pilate' (Fig. 7).

Proviamo allora a ricapitolare la nostra leggendaria elencazione. Ci stiamo occupando di tre leggende che riguardano il medesimo Ponzio Pilato, l'uomo che impartì l'ordine di crocifiggere Gesù Cristo. Abbiamo tra le mani tre differenti luoghi di sepoltura per il nostro povero prefetto dell'antica Roma (Fig. 8).

Il primo è un lago situato tra i Monti Sibillini, in Italia, così come riferito da Antoine de la Sale nel quindicesimo secolo. Nel lago abiterebbero demoni in grado di suscitare tempeste. Quel luogo è chiamato, ancora oggi, i Laghi di Pilato.

Il secondo sito è una sorta di voragine, o pozzo, posta in prossimità di Lione, in Francia, secondo quanto riferito da Stefano di Borbone nel tredicesimo secolo. Nella voragine, qualcosa ha trovato dimora, e da essa fuoriescono tempeste. Questo secondo luogo è situato su di una montagna denominata, ancora ai nostri giorni, Mont de Pilat.

La terza località è un'altra voragine posta vicino alla città di Lucerna, in Svizzera, così come ci tramanda una sconosciuta mano duecentesca con un commento che compare in alcuni manoscritti contenenti un'opera di Goffredo da Viterbo. La voragine contiene qualche cosa di ignoto, tale da suscitare tempeste. Non è un caso che il monte situato nelle vicinanze di Lucerna è chiamato, ancora oggi, Mont Pilate.

E potremmo continuare con ulteriori luoghi nei quali Ponzio Pilato sarebbe stato asseritamente sepolto. Nel suo "Fabularius", Conradus de Mure, un erudito svizzero del tredicesimo secolo, scrive che il cadavere di Pilato, subito dopo il suo travagliato tuffo «in Rodanum apud Viennam», sarebbe stato trasportato «in alpes apud montem septimum», forse un riferimento alle Alpi svizzere e al Septimer Pass, che collega il territorio posto a settentrione del Lago di Como, in Italia, alla Svizzera (Fig. 9).

Il mistero sta assumendo contorni sempre più oscuri, con la figura di Ponzio Pilato che pare irridere il nostro sguardo sconcertato mentre osserviamo i vari luoghi nei quali egli sarebbe sepolto, suscitando tempeste dall'interno di essi e nascondendosi sotto la superficie gelida dei Laghi di Pilato, in Italia.

E allora, come possiamo pensare di procedere oltre?

Per una migliore comprensione dell'intera questione concernente Pilato, i suoi tenebrosi luoghi di sepoltura, e la sinistra leggenda che abita il massiccio dei Monti Sibillini, è giunto il momento di approfondire la nostra conoscenza con il personaggio principale di questo strano racconto.

Chi era Ponzio Pilato?

O, più precisamente, chi fu Ponzio Pilato secondo le fonti letterarie antiche? Esiste un testo che racconti le leggendarie circostanze della sua morte? E perché il prefetto della Giudea dovrebbe essere ricordato in connessione con specifici luoghi di sepoltura, e così peculiari? E, infine, per quale ragione sussisterebbe un legame tra l'antico funzionario romano e i laghi nascosti nel cuore del massiccio dei Monti Sibillini?

Stiamo per andare a incontrare il quinto prefetto della Giudea, occupata in antico dalle legioni dell'Impero Romano. Stiamo per andare a incontrare Ponzio Pilato.

E sarà un incontro assai ravvicinato.














































































































































26 Apr 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /5. The distrust by Antoine de la Sale
In 1420, Antoine de la Sale pushed himself as far as the Sibillini Mountain Range in central Italy; there, he found not only a mount and a cave considered as the abode of a Sibyl, but also a lake, located a few miles from the Sibyl's mount, into which, according to a legendary tale, the body of Pontius Pilate, sentenced to death by Emperor Titus, would have been thrown together with the chariot that was transporting it. In addition to that, the lake had become a site of choice for necromancers to perform their forbidden arts, producing violent storms in the region (Fig. 1).

Antoine de la Sale, who was a young but experienced courtier, was fully aware of the inconsistencies that marked this odd legend about Pilate (Fig. 2):

«Which I think it is untrue because they maintain that Titus sentenced Pilate to death, but Titus came much time after Pilate, who lived at the time and under the rule of Emperor Tiberius, and he was his official in the said town of Jherusalem».

[In the original French text: «Laquelle chose jetrouve faulse en tant quilz dient que titus eust fait mourir pilate car titus fut grant espace apres pillate qui estoit du temps et soubs l'empire de l'empereur thibere et son officier en la dicte cité de Jherusalem»].

As a matter of fact, it is highly improbable that Emperor Titus, who reigned from 79 to 81 A.D., might have had anything to do with a prefect who was in charge more than forty years earlier, when the same Emperor was not yet born. So, certainly there is something wrong with the legend's details.

De la Sale properly notes that if any Emperor had ever murdered Pontius Pilate, that Emperor should have been Tiberius, who ruled from 14 to 37 A.D., during the years when Jesus Christ was crucified in Jerusalem. In an attempt to clarify the issue, the French author quotes an extensive excerpt drawn from Paulus Orosius, an early-Christian theologian and historian who lived between the fourth century and the fifth (Fig. 3):

«As Orosius reports in the second chapter of his eighth book, in which he says that after the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ Pilate sent to the said Tiberius the grand and amazing news about the trial, death and resurrection of the said Jesus of Nazareth [...] by which many people was already convinced that he truly was God or son of God. And that report and letters Tiberius right away forwarded to the Senate [...] eagerly asking the senators to honour that Jesus of Nazareth and consider him as a true god. But the Senate, who greatly opposed Pilate on the ground that he had not first written to them, rejected the Emperor's request and issued an order out of spite, which was immediately sent to Jerusalem that all the followers and disciples of that Jesus of Nazareth be taken and prosecuted. And, on his side, hearing of all that, the Emperor, out of spite too, sent orders that they be helped and favoured and supported instead by all means. So here began a conflict between the senators and the Emperor».

[In the original French text: «Sicomme dit Orose ou second chappitre de son viii livre qui disioit que apres la mort et la resurrection de Jhesucrist pilate envoya au dit thibere cesar les treshaultes et merveilleuses nouvelles et le proces de la mort et resurrection du nomme Jhesus de Nazaret [...] par lesquelles ja maintes gens croioient que il feust Dieu ou filz de dieu vrayement. Le quel proces et lettres le dit empereur incontinant manda aux senateurs [...] priant moult estroittement le senat que icelui jhesus de nazareth feust consacré et tenu a vray dieu. Mais le senat qui fut grandement contre pillate car navoit premierement rescript a eulx reffusa la consecration et fist un esdit par despit que incontinent manderent en Jherusalem prendre et persecuter tous les disciples et croians en icellui jhesus de nazareth. Et dautre part sentant l'empereur ceste chose semblablement par despit deulx remanda que ilz feussent aidiez favorizez et soustenuz a tout pouvoir. Lors commenca le debat des senateurs a lempereur»].

In this specific excerpt taken from Orosius, the ancient Latin author says nothing about Pilate's death. However, Antoine de la Sale provides the reader with his own assumption (Fig. 4):

«In this way the majority of those who had opposed the consecration of Jesus Christ were killed. In this predicament, it might well be that he [Tiberius] had Pilate murdered, but certainly not Titus, the son of Vespasian, in spite of what local people may say. So we can see here that this is a first mistake of them».

[In the original French text: «aussi moururent presque tous qui avoient este contraires a la consecration de Jhesucrist. Par la quelle chose peut bien estre quil fist mourir pilate, mais non pas titus de vespasien ainsi que ceulx dudit pais dient. Et voies icy leur premiere erreur»].

That was all that Antoine de la Sale could tell his readers about the weird, amazing, bizarre legend of the Lake of Pilate, nested within precipitous mountains in the middle of the Italian peninsula.

Many things he said; yet not clear enough to have a clue on what all that meant, and still means.

And the issues do not end here.

In fact, there is one critical, specific issue concerning the legend of the Lakes of Pilate. Actually, more than one issue.

Because the Lakes of Pilate are not alone. It actually seems that Pontius Pilate, the ancient prefect of Roman-occupied Judaea, the man who washed his hands while sentencing Jesus Christ to death (Fig. 5), underwent a peculiar fate.

He was buried more than once. In different places.

There are several resting places for the mortal remains of Pilate. Scattered across various lakes and mounts around Europe. And, for each one of them, there is a legend.

And such legends are very, very similar to that one narrated by Antoine de la Sale with relation to the Sibillini Mountain Range.

What does it all mean? Which places and legends are we talking about? What is the link, if any, which connects them all?

To answer all these questions, let's start our journey into the many tales which narrate of Pontius Pilate and his burial site. And let's see what happens.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /5. I dubbi di Antoine de la Sale
Nel 1420, Antoine de la Sale si spinse fino al massiccio dei Monti Sibillini, nell'Italia centrale; lì, egli trovò non solamente una montagna e una grotta che si riteneva fossero la dimora di una Sibilla, ma anche un lago, posto a poche miglia dal monte della Sibilla, nel quale, secondo una leggendaria narrazione, sarebbe stato gettato il corpo di Ponzio Pilato, dopo la condanna a morte da parte dell'imperatore Tito, assieme al carro che lo aveva trasportato fin sulla montagna. Inoltre, quel lago sarebbe stato un luogo considerato dai negromanti come adatto alla pratica delle proprie arti proibite, le quali generavano violente tempeste in tutta la regione (Fig. 1).

Antoine de la Sale, che era un esperto cortigiano, seppure all'epoca ancora giovane, si rendeva perfettamente conto delle inverosimiglianze che caratterizzavano quella strana leggenda a proposito di Pilato (Fig. 2):

«Cosa che non penso possa essere vera, perché essi raccontano come sia stato Tito a far morire Pilato, ma Tito visse un grande lasso di tempo dopo Pilato, che visse invece ai tempi e sotto il dominio dell'imperatore Tiberio, e fu suo prefetto nella detta città di Gerusalemme».

[Nel testo originale francese: «Laquelle chose jetrouve faulse en tant quilz dient que titus eust fait mourir pilate car titus fut grant espace apres pillate qui estoit du temps et soubs l'empire de l'empereur thibere et son officier en la dicte cité de Jherusalem»].

Effettivamente, appare assai improbabile che l'imperatore Tito, il quale regnò tra il 79 e l'81 d.C., possa avere avuto qualcosa a che fare con un prefetto che fu in carica più di quaranta anni prima, quando quello stesso imperatore non era neppure nato. Quindi, certamente, nei dettagli di quella leggenda c'era qualcosa di sbagliato.

De la Sale nota correttamente che se veramente un imperatore fece condannare a morte Ponzio Pilato, questo imperatore non sarebbe potuto essere che Tiberio, il quale fu al vertice dell'Impero di Roma tra il 14 e il 37 d.C., negli stessi anni in cui Gesù Cristo subì la crocifissione a Gerusalemme. Nel tentativo di chiarire la questione, l'autore provenzale riporta un lungo passaggio tratto da Paolo Orosio, un teologo e storico protocristiano, vissuto tra il quarto e il quinto secolo (Fig. 3):

«Come racconta Orosio nel secondo capitolo del suo ottavo libro, nel quale egli dice che dopo la morte e la resurrezione di Gesù Cristo Pilato inviò al citato imperatore Tiberio le importanti e meravigliose notizie concernenti il processo, la morte e la resurrezione del predetto Gesù Cristo [...] dalle quali già molte persone avevano cominciato a credere che egli fosse realmente Dio o il Figlio di Dio. E quel rapporto e le lettere Tiberio li inviò senza indugio all'attenzione dei senatori [...] pregando con convinzione il Senato che quel Gesù di Nazareth fosse onorato e considerato come un vero dio. Ma il Senato, che si opponeva fortemente a Pilato perché non si era rivolto a essi sin dal principio, rifiutò di tributare tali onori e, mosso dal dispetto, emise invece un editto affinché fossero subito catturati e perseguitati, a Gerusalemme, tutti i discepoli e i seguaci di quel Gesù di Nazareth. Dal canto suo, l'imperatore, udendo tali cose, animato da un medesimo sentimento di dispetto contro i senatori, ordinò che i seguaci di Cristo fossero aiutati, favoriti e sostenuti in ogni modo. E cominciò così un conflitto tra senatori e imperatore».

[Nel testo originale francese: «Sicomme dit Orose ou second chappitre de son viii livre qui disioit que apres la mort et la resurrection de Jhesucrist pilate envoya au dit thibere cesar les treshaultes et merveilleuses nouvelles et le proces de la mort et resurrection du nomme Jhesus de Nazaret [...] par lesquelles ja maintes gens croioient que il feust Dieu ou filz de dieu vrayement. Le quel proces et lettres le dit empereur incontinant manda aux senateurs [...] priant moult estroittement le senat que icelui jhesus de nazareth feust consacré et tenu a vray dieu. Mais le senat qui fut grandement contre pillate car navoit premierement rescript a eulx reffusa la consecration et fist un esdit par despit que incontinent manderent en Jherusalem prendre et persecuter tous les disciples et croians en icellui jhesus de nazareth. Et dautre part sentant l'empereur ceste chose semblablement par despit deulx remanda que ilz feussent aidiez favorizez et soustenuz a tout pouvoir. Lors commenca le debat des senateurs a lempereur»].

In questo specifico brano tratto da Orosio, l'antico autore latino nulla dice a proposito delle circostanze della morte di Pilato. Nondimeno, Antoine de la Sale fornisce al lettore la propria personale ipotesi (Fig. 4):

«Così furono mandati a morte quasi tutti coloro che si erano opposti alla consacrazione di Gesù Cristo. In tali occorrenze, è ben possibile che Pilato sia stato anch'egli ucciso, ma non certo da Tito, figlio di Vespasiano, malgrado ciò che ne racconta la gente del luogo. Ed ecco, dunque, il loro primo errore».

[Nel testo originale francese: «aussi moururent presque tous qui avoient este contraires a la consecration de Jhesucrist. Par la quelle chose peut bien estre quil fist mourir pilate, mais non pas titus de vespasien ainsi que ceulx dudit pais dient. Et voies icy leur premiere erreur»].

Questo è tutto quello che Antoine de la Sale poté riferire ai propri lettori in merito alla strana, strabiliante, bizzarra leggenda del Lago di Pilato, profondamente annidato tra alte montagne nel mezzo della penisola italiana.

Molte cose egli ci ha raccontato; ma non abbastanza da poterci formare un'idea su cosa tutto questo potesse significare, e ancora oggi significhi.

E i problemi non finiscono certo qui.

Invero, sussiste un'ulteriore questione, assai critica, in relazione alla leggenda dei Laghi di Pilato. Anzi, più di una questione.

Perché i Laghi di Pilato non sono affatto unici. Sembrerebbe infatti che Ponzio Pilato, l'antico prefetto della Giudea occupata dai Romani, l'uomo che si lavò le mani mentre condannava a morte Gesù Cristo (Fig. 5), abbia subìto un destino assai particolare.

Egli fu sepolto molte volte. In molti luoghi diversi.

In effetti, esistono diversi luoghi presso i quali si dice siano stati sepolti i resti mortali di Ponzio Pilato. Luoghi sparsi tra vari laghi e montagne attraverso l'Europa. E, per ognuno di essi, esiste una leggenda.

E queste leggende sono molto, molto simili a quella raccontata da Antoine de la Sale a proposito del massiccio dei Monti Sibillini.

Cosa significa tutto ciò? Di quali luoghi e leggende stiamo parlando? Quale è il legame, se ne esiste uno, che unisce tutto questo?

Per rispondere a tutte queste domande, diamo inizio al nostro viaggio attraverso i molti racconti che narrano di Ponzio Pilato e del suo luogo di sepoltura. E andiamo a vedere cosa succede.


























































24 Apr 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /4. A chariot, an islet, many necromancers and lots of guards
A lake lies on elevated grounds in the middle of Mount Vettore's glacial cirque, within the Italian Sibillini Mountain Range. And, according to a legend narrated by Antoine de la Sale, a fifteenth century French author, the lake is named after Pontius Pilate.

Manuscript no. 0653 (0924), preserved at the Bibliothèque du Château (Musée Condé) in Chantilly (France), contains Antoine de la Sale's “The Paradise of Queen Sibyl”, in which the French gentleman tells his readers an odd story about a chariot, two pairs of buffaloes and the dead corpse of Pilate, all of them eventually cast into the lake's icy waters following an amazing race up the mountain-side.

And an astounding miniature, at folium 4r of the manuscript, portrays Pontius Pilate himself lying on his chariot pulled by the four buffaloes: a vivid representation of such an utterly bizarre tale (Fig. 1).

From the lake, Mount Sibyl with its enchanted cave, the abode of an Apennine Sibyl, is in full view.

What does it all mean? Why do so many legends, at all appearances featuring utterly different traits, seem to insist on the same location, in central Italy?

Let's make an attempt at finding further clues in the said manuscript. As we already detailed, the parchment leaves contain the account that de la Sale wrote two decades after he paid a visit to Mount Sibyl on May, 18th 1420. In the manuscript, the French man of letters provides a detailed description of what was to be found at the lake (Fig. 2):

«This lake, in my opinion, is the size of your town of Moulins» («Ce lac est en mon semblant du tour de vostre ville de moulins»).

We must recall that Antoine de la Sale wrote his account for the enjoyment of Agnes of Burgundy, Duchess of Bourbon. The town of Moulins-sur-Allier was the capital of the Duchy of Bourbon, in central France. As an interesting exercise, we can easily calculate the size of the ancient castle of Moulins by comparing a map drawn by the Cassini family in the eighteenth century with the corresponding satellite view taken from GoogleMaps: the downtown area of modern Moulins, corresponding to the original castle, is around 1,300 feet wide (as marked by the yellow ruler in the figure - Fig. 3). This is not so different from the size of the valley housing the two lakes of Pilate which we see today, marked by the same ruler for the sake of comparison (Fig. 4). Thus the estimate provided by Antoine de la Sale is fairly right.

In our present times, we actually have two small lakes, instead of only one as it appears in Antoine de la Sale's fifteenth-century description. However, we must be aware that in the subsequent five centuries many landslides, often caused by violent earthquakes, have fallen onto the lake from the looming 'Pizzo del Diavolo', the sheer wall of rock which surmounts the waters: as a result, the bottom of the glacial cirque in which the lakes rest has gradually increased in elevation, as the debris filled up the hollow, until the lake split in two the way they appear today. Anyway, in years when snow and rain are abundant, the two lakes still tende to merge into one, as it can be noticed in recent pictures (Fig. 5).

So Antoine de la Sale's description can be considered as very accurate. Yet de la Sale is even more rigorous than that. He also depicts what was to be encountered at the very center of the lake, a feature that today has completely disappeared under the rubble cast on it by hundreds of years of landslides (Fig. 6):

«In the middle there is a small islet made of one boulder which was once walled all around, and the lower portion of this wall is still extant in many points. From the shore to the small island there is a narrow walkway submerged by the water which is five feet high as people told me; that passage was broken down by the local residents so as to make it impracticable, so that those who reached the island to consecrate their books by the art of necromancy wouldn't be able to find it anymore».

[In the original French text: «Au milieu a une petite islete dun rochier qui jadis fut muree tout en tour encores y sont les fondemens du mur en plusieurs lieux. De la terre à celle isle a une petite chausse couverte deaue a la haulteur de v piez comme les gens me dirent laquelle fust rompue tant quon ne la peust cuier par les gens du pais affin que ceulz qui aloient en lisle consacrer leurs livres pour lart dingromance ne la peussent trouver»].

As you can see, the legend is getting increasingly entangled. Now we are considering not only a resting place for Pontius Pilate, but also a place suitable for practicing forbidden black arts.

But the story is even more perplexing than that. A third element is introduced by the author, which seems to have nothing to do with all the rest (Fig. 7):

«That island is strictly guarded and protected from the local people on the ground that when anybody comes to it covertly and performs the art of the Fiend, after the operation is made a storm so violent raises in the region that all crops and goods in the country get spoiled».

[In the original French text: «La quelle isle est moult gardee et deffendue des gens du pais pource que quant aucun y vient seleement et a fait son art de l'ennemy apres se fait se lieve une tempeste si grant par le pais qui gaste tous les fruiz et biens de la contree»].

What is the meaning of all that? Is it just a foolish tale, a silly rumour circulating amid the populace and the local villagers? Not in the least. Because people seemed to truly believe in that, and foreigners did actually come to the lake to the said evil purposes, so much so that drastic countermeasures were often taken (Fig. 8):

«For this reason when the local people, who take great care in that, find someone there, he his not welcome. And not much time has elapsed since two men were caught, one of them being a priest. The priest was brought to the said town of Norcia and there was martyred and burnt. The other was slaughtered into pieces and then thrown into the lake from the very people who had caught them both».

[In the original French text: «Et porce quant les gens du pays qui ad ce prennent moult grant garde y trouvent aucun il est mal venu. Et navoit pas long temps quel y fut prins deux hommes dont lun estoit prestre ce preste fut admene a la dicte cite de norce et la fut martire et ars. Lautre fut taille a pieces et puis boute dedens le lac par ceulz qui les avoient prins»].

However, continues Antoine de la Sale, honourable visitors are always allowed to pay a visit to the lake, if they obtain a clearance from the local authorities (Fig. 9):

«But if anybody wishes to see the said lake, for his own safety it is advisable to ask the rulers of the above town, who will gladly provide a permit to see it with no other requirements, provided that they go as upright men would do».

[In the original French text: «Mais si aucun prenoit plaisir a veoir ce dit lac pour lasseurete de sa personne lui convient aler aux seigneurs de la dicte cite qui voulentiers lui donneront conduit pour ce veoir sans aultre chose faire, sil vait en estat domme de bien»].

This is how Antoine de la Sale, in his fifteenth-century account, depicts the Lake of Pilate and the gloomy tales which loomed over the glacial cirque of Mount Vettore, in Italy.

Why should the body of Pontius Pilate have been buried as far as such remote waters hidden in the very core of the Italian Sibillini Mountain Range? What do necromancers have to do with a lake hosting a dead Roman prefect in it? And why black arts should be performed in so outlandish a place?

We will try to provide an answer to all the listed questions. And we will start our enquiry from the puzzled statements written on the subject, in his “The Paradise of Queen Sibyl”, by Antoine de la Sale himself.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /4. Un carro, un'isola, vari negromanti e molte sentinelle
Un lago giace in alta quota nel mezzo del circo glaciale del Monte Vettore, all'interno del massiccio dei Monti Sibillini. E, secondo la leggenda narrata da Antoine de la Sale, letterato provenzale vissuto nel quindicesimo secolo, il lago sarebbe stato intitolato a Ponzio Pilato.

Il manoscritto n. 0653 (0924) conservato presso la Bibliothèque du Château (Musée Condé) a Chantilly, in Francia, contiene "Il Paradiso della Regina Sibilla", nelle cui pagine Antoine de la Sale racconta ai propri lettori una storia assai stravagante, che narra di un carro, di due coppie di bufali e del corpo di Ponzio Pilato, la cui folle corsa su per il fianco della montagna avrebbe avuto termine con un tuffo all'interno delle gelide acque del lago.

E una straordinaria miniatura, presente nel foglio 4r del manoscritto, ritrae proprio Ponzio Pilato, giacente sul suo carro trainato dai quattro bufali: una vivida illustrazione di questo bizzarro racconto (Fig. 1).

Da quel lago, è pienamente visibile il Monte Sibilla, con la sua caverna incantata, dimora della Sibilla Appenninica.

Cosa significa tutto ciò? Perché così tante leggende, a prima vista caratterizzate da aspetti del tutto dissimili e tra di loro inconciliabili, sembrerebbero insistere nei medesimi luoghi, localizzati nell'Italia centrale?

Cerchiamo di reperire ulteriori indizi all'interno del manoscritto citato. Come abbiamo già avuto modo di illustrare, le pagine di pergamena contengono il resoconto che de la Sale vergò circa due decenni dopo avere effettuato la propria escursione presso il Monte Sibilla, il 18 maggio 1420. Nel manoscritto, il letterato francese fornisce una dettagliata descrizione a proposito di ciò che si sarebbe potuto osservare presso quel lago (Fig. 2):

«Questo lago, a mio parere, ha la circonferenza della vostra città di Moulins» («Ce lac est en mon semblant du tour de vostre ville de moulins»).

Dobbiamo ricordare come Antoine de la Sale scrivesse il proprio resoconto per il diletto di Agnese di Borgogna, Duchessa di Borbone. La città di Moulins-sur-Allier era la capitale del Ducato di Borbone, nella Francia centrale. Come interessante esercizio, possiamo facilmente calcolare le dimensioni dell'antico castello di Moulins confrontando una mappa disegnata dalla famiglia Cassini nel diciassettesimo secolo con la corrispondente immagine satellitare tratta da GoogleMaps: il centro cittadino dell'odierna Moulins, corrispondente all'originale castello, si estende per circa 400 metri di ampiezza (così come marcato dal righello giallo in figura - Fig. 3). Questa ampiezza non è molto diversa dalla dimensione della vallata che ospita i due laghi di Pilato così come oggi visibili, marcati dallo stesso righello a titolo di confronto (Fig. 4). Dunque, la stima fornitaci da Antoine de la Sale appare essere sufficientemente corretta.

Oggi, in effetti, si rileva la presenza di due laghi, invece di uno solo così come appare nella descrizione vergata da Antoine de la Sale nel quindicesimo secolo. Dobbiamo però considerare come, nel corso dei cinque secoli successivi, diverse frane, spesso causate da violenti terremoti, siano crollate sul lago dal sovrastante e incombente Pizzo del Diavolo, il muro verticale di roccia che si trova al di sopra delle acque lacustri: il risultato è che il fondo del circo glaciale nel quale i laghi sono adagiati ha subito nel tempo un graduale innalzamento di livello, a mano a mano che il materiale roccioso ne riempiva la cavità, finché il lago non si è suddiviso nei due specchi d'acqua che oggi è possibile osservare. In ogni caso, nel corso delle particolari annate nelle quali nevi e piogge cadono in abbondanza, i due laghi tendono ancora a riunirsi in uno solo, così come possiamo notare in recenti immagini del luogo (Fig. 5).

Dunque, la descrizione resa disponibile da Antoine de la Sale può essere considerata come assai accurata. E de la Sale non si limita solamente a questo: egli ci illustra anche cosa era visibile, nella sua epoca, al centro del lago, un elemento che oggi è completamente sparito, cancellato dai detriti che sono precipitati su di esso nel corso di centinaia di anni di frane (Fig. 6):

«Nel mezzo si trova una piccola isoletta costituita da un'enorme roccia, che un tempo fu murata tutt'attorno, e in molti punti sono ancora visibili le parti inferiori di questo muro. Dalla riva a quest'isola corre un piccolo passaggio, sommerso nell'acqua profonda cinque piedi, così come la gente mi disse, il quale fu danneggiato dagli abitanti del luogo al fine di renderlo impraticabile, in modo che coloro che si recavano all'isola per consacrare i loro libri per arte di negromanzia non la potessero trovare più».

[Nel testo originale francese: «Au milieu a une petite islete dun rochier qui jadis fut muree tout en tour encores y sont les fondemens du mur en plusieurs lieux. De la terre à celle isle a une petite chausse couverte deaue a la haulteur de v piez comme les gens me dirent laquelle fust rompue tant quon ne la peust cuier par les gens du pais affin que ceulz qui aloient en lisle consacrer leurs livres pour lart dingromance ne la peussent trouver»].

Come si può notare, la leggenda sta assumendo contorni sempre più intricati. Ora stiamo considerando non solamente un luogo di sepoltura per Ponzio Pilato, ma anche un sito adatto alla pratica di arti magiche e proibite.

Ma la questione assume toni ancora più sconcertanti. L'autore introduce, infatti, un terzo elemento, che parrebbe non avere nulla a che fare con tutto il resto (Fig. 7):

«Quell'isola è attentamente sorvegliata e protetta dalla gente del luogo, perché quando qualcuno vi perviene segretamente e vi pratica le arti del Demonio, subito si leva nella regione una tempesta così violenta da distruggere tutti i raccolti e i beni della contrada».

[Nel testo originale francese: «La quelle isle est moult gardee et deffendue des gens du pais pource que quant aucun y vient seleement et a fait son art de l'ennemy apres se fait se lieve une tempeste si grant par le pais qui gaste tous les fruiz et biens de la contree»].

Cosa significa tutto ciò? Si tratta solamente di un racconto privo di qualsivoglia fondamento, una stupida chiacchiera che circolava tra il popolino e i villici del luogo? Niente affatto. Perché la gente pareva realmente credere in tutto questo, ed effettivamente vi erano stranieri che si recavano al lago per porre in atto i malvagi disegni in precedenza menzionati, così frequentemente che spesso venivano assunte contromisure assai drastiche (Fig. 8):

«Per questa ragione, quando la gente del luogo, che molta sorveglianza manteneva, vi trovava qualcuno, egli non era affatto benvenuto. E non è passato molto tempo da quando vi furono presi due uomini, di cui uno era un prete. Il prete fu condotto alla detta città di Norcia e là fu torturato e arso vivo. L'altro fu fatto a pezzi e poi gettato nel lago dagli stessi uomini che lo avevano catturato».

[Nel testo originale francese: «Et porce quant les gens du pays qui ad ce prennent moult grant garde y trouvent aucun il est mal venu. Et navoit pas long temps quel y fut prins deux hommes dont lun estoit prestre ce preste fut admene a la dicte cite de norce et la fut martire et ars. Lautre fut taille a pieces et puis boute dedens le lac par ceulz qui les avoient prins»].

Nondimeno, continua Antoine de la Sale, i visitatori animati da buone intenzioni potevano sempre chiedere di potere effettuare una visita al lago, ottenendo un preventivo benestare dalle locali autorità (Fig. 9):

«Ma se qualcuno desiderasse vedere questo lago, per la sua stessa sicurezza gli converrebbe recarsi presso i signori della detta città, i quali ben volentieri gli concederebbero un salvacondotto per vedere il lago, ma senza compiere altri atti, se egli veramente vi si reca come uomo onesto».

[Nel testo originale francese: «Mais si aucun prenoit plaisir a veoir ce dit lac pour lasseurete de sa personne lui convient aler aux seigneurs de la dicte cite qui voulentiers lui donneront conduit pour ce veoir sans aultre chose faire, sil vait en estat domme de bien»].

Questo, dunque, il racconto con il quale Antoine de la Sale, nel suo resoconto quattrocentesco, descrive il Lago di Pilato e le sinistre narrazioni che aleggiavano all'interno del circo glaciale del Monte Vettore.

Perché il corpo di Ponzio Pilato sarebbe stato sepolto in queste acque remote, occultate nel cuore più profondo dei Monti Sibillini, in Italia? Che cosa hanno a che fare i negromanti con un lago che nasconderebbe il cadavere di un antico prefetto romano? E perché si sarebbero dovute praticare arti proibite in un luogo così peculiare?

Tenteremo di fornire una risposta a tutte queste domande. E cominceremo la nostra indagine dalle perplesse considerazioni che, nel manoscritto de "Il Paradiso della Regina Sibilla", ci vengono proposte dallo stesso Antoine de la Sale.

























































































































22 Apr 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /3. A legendary plunge into cold waters
In our previous article we described the nature of the Lakes of Pilate, sitting at the very centre of a glacial cirque in the Sibillini Mountain Range, and the weird aura that lingers on that site. Certainly it appears to be as a place particularly fit to host an eerie legend. And this is actually the case.

But what sort of legendary tale did settle here?

Let's begin with the words written on the subject by a recognised expert: Antoine de la Sale, the French gentleman who visited Mount Sibyl on May, 18th 1420 and put down an account of his venturesome excursion in his “The Paradise of Queen Sibyl”, a work contained in a most precious illuminated manuscript, no. 0653 (0924) preserved at the Bibliothèque du Château (Musée Condé) in Chantilly (France).

The manuscript, enriched with a bounty of fine miniatures, portrays what Antoine de la Sale calls, at folium 2v, the «mountain of the lake of Queen Sibyl, which some name the mountain of the lake of Pilate [...] part of the Duchy of Spoletium and in the territory of the town of Norcia» (in the original French text: «mont du lac de la royne sibille, que aulcuns appellent le mont du lac de pillate [...] parties de la Duchié despollit et au terroir de la cite de Norse») (Fig. 1).

At the very beginning of our search, we stumble right upon a remarkable piece of information: the lake is referred to by Antoine de la Sale as a feature which is in strong, direct connection to the Sibyl and her mount, so much so that the lake is first named after the Sibyl, and only secondarily it is indicated as linked to Pilate.

And this sound connection is effectively depicted by Antoine de la Sale in a remarkable miniature (folia 5v - 6r) which shows the two mountains, facing one another, the way they stand in actual reality: Mount Vettore, sitting on the left side of the picture with his lake set beneath the mountain-top; and Mount Sibyl, on the right side, with its mysterious cave carved on the cliff, which is surmounted by its most renowned crown of precipitous rock (Fig. 2). A powerful graphical representation of a clue that we will fully address later in this and subsequent articles.

But let's stick to Antoine de la Sale's description, and see how he reports the odd legend that lived on that eerie mountain (folium 2v):

«Tales are told that when Titus son of Vespasian, the Emperor of Rome, had crushed down the town of Jerusalem, which some say that it was made to avenge the death of Our Lord Jesus Christ [...] when he came back to Rome he brought with him Pilate who at that time was an officier at the said town of Jerusalem».

[In the original French text: «se compte que quant titus de vespasien empereur de romme eut destruitte la cite de Jherusalem la quelle aucuns disent que ce fut pour la vengence de la mort Nostre Sieu Jhesuscrist [...] au retour que fist a romme, mena avecques soy pillate qui pour ce temps estoit officier en la ditte cite de Jherusalem»] (Fig. 3).

So we see that the legendary tale, according to «the way local people report it» («la forme du parler des gens d'iceluy pays» in French), is marked by a significant trait, as it is situated in a most definite Christian context: revenge for the Passion, punishment for a town where Jesus Christ was betrayed and put to death. And a special treatment is envisaged for a personage who was individually responsible for the killing of the Son of God (folium 2v):

«[...] following the will of the people of Rome, he [the Emperor] decided to put him to death on the ground that Pilate had not intended to condemn our true saviour Jesus Christ, yet he had failed in his duty to preserve him from death».

[In the original French text: «[...] voiant tout le peuple il le fist mourir suppose que pillate ne voullist oncques condampner nostredit vray sauveur Jhesuscrist mais pour ce quil ne fist son devoir a le garantir de mort»] (Fig. 4).

Thus, the legend has its main character: a villain, a man who, as we know from the Gospels, had certainly a major part in the murder of Jesus, owing to the post he was helding at that time as a prominent Roman authority in the occupied Judaea.

But what has it all got to do with the Sibillini Mountain Range in Italy? Here is how Antoine de la Sale reports what he was told by local people (folium 4r):

«Furthermore people say that when Pilate saw that there was no way left for him to save his own life, he asked to be granted a last wish, which was accorded to him: he demanded that after his death his body be placed on a chariot drawn by two pairs of buffaloes and allowed to wander wherever the buffaloes may lead it. And they tell this is what was actually done».

[In the original French text: «Encores disent les gens que quant pilate vit que de sa vie ny avoit nul remede plus, il supplia un don qui lui fut accorde alors requist que apres sa mort son corps feust mis sur un char attelle de deux paires de buffles et feust laissie aler la ou laventure des buffles le porteroit et ainsi dient que fut fait»] (Fig. 5).

And here is the core of the legend, the connection to Mount Sibyl and the neighbouring mountain, known today as Mount Vettore:

«But the Emperor, who wondered at this request, wished to be informed of the course taken by the chariot, so he ordered his men to follow it until the buffaloes reached the shore of this lake and threw themselves into the waters together with all the chariot and Pilate's corpse, and they did it so quickly as if they were being chased with the utmost haste. And this is the reason for which this lake is called after Pilate».

[In the original French text: «Mais l'empereur qui se esmerveilla de ceste requeste si voult scavoir ou le chair adresseroit si le fist suir tant que les bouffles vindrent au bourt de ce lac si se bouterent a tout le chair et le corps de pilate dedens ainsi hastivement que se on les suivist batant le plus que len pourroit. Et pour ceste raison est dit le lac de pilate»] (Fig. 6).

A lake dedicated to Pontius Pilate, an ancient Roman prefect who ruled Judaea when Jesus underwent his atrocious Passion. Right in the middle of the Sibillini Mountain Range, in Italy.

Yet Antoine de la Sale does not miss the chance to emphasize again the fact that these waters are also known as a Sibyl's Lake (folia 4r - 4v):

«Others call it the lake of the Sibyl because Mount Sibyl is right before it and connected to the lake, apart from a small streamlet which runs between them in the way portrayed in the following figure» («Les autres lappellent le lac de la sibille pour ce que le mont de la sibille est devant et joignant a cestu fors dun petit ruisseau qui court entre deux en la maniere que cy apres est pourtrait») (Fig. 7).

How can it be that a legend on Pontius Pilate, who has nothing to do with the Sibillini Mountain Range, got stuck exactly here? And why did the myth choose a place which is already linked, someway and somehow, to a different legend, that of an Apennine Sibyl?

Before we try to answer all such critical questions, we still have to peruse the words written by Antoine de la Sale in his “The Paradise of Queen Sibyl”.

We will stumble upon additional clues that might put our investigation on the right track. Let's go and find out.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /3. Un tuffo leggendario in acque gelide
Nel nostro precedente articolo abbiamo descritto la natura dei Laghi di Pilato, posti al centro di un circo glaciale nel massiccio dei Monti Sibillini, nonché l'atmosfera inquietante e sinistra che caratterizza quei luoghi. È come se il sito si prestasse, in modo particolare, a ospitare un qualche genere di misteriosa leggenda. E, in effetti, è proprio così.

Ma che genere di racconto leggendario ha trovato dimora in questi luoghi?

Cominciamo dalle parole vergate sull'argomento da un illustre esperto: Antoine de la Sale, il gentiluomo provenzale che, il 18 maggio 1420, effettuò una visita presso il Monte Sibilla, raccontando la propria avventurosa escursione nell'opera "Il Paradiso della Regina Sibilla", contenuta in un pregevolissimo manoscritto miniato, il n. 0653 (0924) conservato presso la Bibliothèque du Château (Musée Condé) a Chantilly, in Francia.

Il manoscritto, arricchito da una serie di meravigliose miniature, ci fornisce un'immagine di ciò che Antoine de la Sale chiama, al folium 2v, il «monte del lago della Regina Sibilla, che alcuni chiamano il monte del lago di Pilato [...] parte del Ducato di Spoleto e nel territorio della città di Norcia» (nel testo originale francese: «mont du lac de la royne sibille, que aulcuns appellent le mont du lac de pillate [...] parties de la Duchié despollit et au terroir de la cite de Norse») (Fig. 1).

Abbiamo appena dato inizio a questa nostra nuova ricerca, e già ci imbattiamo in un elemento informativo di estrema rilevanza: Antoine de la Sale ci presenta un riferimento al lago ponendolo immediatamente in stretta, diretta connessione con la Sibilla e la sua montagna, tanto da indicare che quelle acque sono in primo luogo identificate con il nome della Sibilla, e che solo in via secondaria sussiste un legame con Pilato.

E questa profonda connessione con la Sibilla è, in effetti, raffigurata da Antoine de la Sale all'interno di una interessantissima miniatura (folia 5v - 6r), nella quale ci vengono mostrate le due montagne, poste l'una di fronte all'altra, nel modo in cui esse si presentano anche nella realtà: il Monte Vettore, posto nel lato sinistro dell'immagine, con il suo lago localizzato al di sotto della cima; e il Monte Sibilla, sul lato destro, con la misteriosa grotta che si apre sulla vetta, circondata quest'ultima dalla sua notissima corona di roccia precipite (Fig. 2). Si tratta della potente rappresentazione grafica di elementi e indizi che andremo ad analizzare in dettaglio in questo articolo e in altri di prossima pubblicazione.

Ma continuiamo a leggere la descrizione fornitaci da Antoine de la Sale, e vediamo come egli continui a raccontare la strana leggenda che vive su quella sinistra montagna (folium 2v):

«Si narra che quando Tito, figlio di Vespasiano, ebbe distrutto la città di Gerusalemme, cosa che alcuni affermano sia stata compiuta per vendicare la morte di Nostro Signore Gesù Cristo [...] quando egli ritornò a Roma, portò con sé Pilato, che a quel tempo era governatore presso la detta città di Gerusalemme».

[Nel testo originale francese: «se compte que quant titus de vespasien empereur de romme eut destruitte la cite de Jherusalem la quelle aucuns disent que ce fut pour la vengence de la mort Nostre Sieu Jhesuscrist [...] au retour que fist a romme, mena avecques soy pillate qui pour ce temps estoit officier en la ditte cite de Jherusalem»] (Fig. 3).

È possibile notare, dunque, come questo racconto leggendario, secondo «quanto ne racconta la gente di questo territorio» («la forme du parler des gens d'iceluy pays» in Francese), sia marcato da un tratto assai significativo, essendo inserito in un contesto decisamente cristiano: vendetta per la Passione, punizione per la città nella quale Gesù Cristo fu tradito e messo a morte. E, inoltre, in esso venga considerato uno speciale trattamento per un personaggio che fu individualmente responsabile per l'uccisione del Figlio di Dio (folium 2v):

«[...] avendo considerato la volontà di tutto il popolo di Roma, egli decise di metterlo a morte, perché anche se Pilato non aveva desiderato condannare il nostro vero salvatore Gesù Cristo, non aveva comunque adempiuto al proprio dovere di proteggerlo dalla morte».

[Nel testo originale francese: «[...] voiant tout le peuple il le fist mourir suppose que pillate ne voullist oncques condampner nostredit vray sauveur Jhesuscrist mais pour ce quil ne fist son devoir a le garantir de mort»] (Fig. 4).

Dunque, la leggenda ha un suo protagonista: un personaggio negativo, un uomo che, come ben sappiamo dai Vangeli, ebbe un ruolo fondamentale nella morte di Gesù, a motivo della posizione che egli ricopriva, a quel tempo, in qualità di alto ufficiale di Roma nella Giudea occupata.

Ma cosa ha a che fare, tutto questo, con i Monti Sibillini, in Italia? Ecco come Antoine de la Sale ci riferisce ciò che gli venne raccontato dalla gente del luogo (folium 4r):

«Inoltre, la gente dice che quando Pilato vide che la sua vita era ormai perduta, egli chiese che fosse esaudita una sua volontà, cosa che gli fu accordata: egli domandò che, dopo la sua morte, il suo corpo fosse posto su di un carro tirato da due coppie di bufali, e che esso fosse lasciato vagare là dove i bufali avessero potuto tarsportarlo. E così dicono che fu fatto».

[Nel testo originale francese: «Encores disent les gens que quant pilate vit que de sa vie ny avoit nul remede plus, il supplia un don qui lui fut accorde alors requist que apres sa mort son corps feust mis sur un char attelle de deux paires de buffles et feust laissie aler la ou laventure des buffles le porteroit et ainsi dient que fut fait»] (Fig. 5).

Ed ecco ora apparire il nucleo della leggenda, il legame con il Monte Sibilla e l'adiacente montagna, nota oggi come Monte Vettore:

«Ma l'imperatore, che si meravigliò nell'udire questa richiesta, volle sapere dove il carro si sarebbe diretto; così, lo fece seguire, finché i bufali arrivarono ai bordi di questo lago e si gettarono nelle sue acque insieme a tutto il carro e al corpo di Pilato, così rapidamente che fu come se, inseguiti, stessero fuggendo alla massima velocità. E per questo motivo il lago è detto di Pilato».

[Nel testo originale francese: «Mais l'empereur qui se esmerveilla de ceste requeste si voult scavoir ou le chair adresseroit si le fist suir tant que les bouffles vindrent au bourt de ce lac si se bouterent a tout le chair et le corps de pilate dedens ainsi hastivement que se on les suivist batant le plus que len pourroit. Et pour ceste raison est dit le lac de pilate»] (Fig. 6).

Un lago dedicato a Ponzio Pilato, un antico prefetto romano che fu governatore della Giudea quando Gesù subì la sua atroce Passione. Posto esattamente nel mezzo del massiccio dei Monti Sibillini, in Italia.

Eppure, Antoine de la Sala non perde occasione per rimarcare, nuovamente, come queste acque siano note anche come il Lago della Sibilla (folia 4r - 4v):

«Altri lo chiamano il Lago della Sibilla perché il Monte Sibilla è situato proprio di fronte, e unito a questo a meno di un piccolo ruscello che corre tra di essi, nel modo che qui di seguito viene raffigurato» («Les autres lappellent le lac de la sibille pour ce que le mont de la sibille est devant et joignant a cestu fors dun petit ruisseau qui court entre deux en la maniere que cy apres est pourtrait») (Fig. 7).

Come è possibile che una leggenda relativa a Ponzio Pilato, che nulla ha a che fare con i Monti Sibillini, si sia stabilita proprio qui? E perché questo mito avrebbe scelto di dimorare in un luogo che risulta essere già abitato, in un modo o nell'altro, da una leggenda differente, quella che riguarda una Sibilla Appenninica?

Prima di provare a fornire una risposta a tutte queste questioni assai critiche, è necessario continuare a considerare le parole vergate da Antoine de la Sale nel suo "Il Paradiso della Regina Sibilla".

Ci imbatteremo, infatti, in ulteriori indizi che potrebbero essere in grado di porre la nostra investigazione sulla pista giusta. Proviamo dunque ad inoltrarci ancora più avanti nel racconto della leggenda.






















































































21 Apr 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /2. The awe-inspiring hollow of Mount Vettore
At the very centre of Italy the fastnesses of the Sibillini Mountain Range, a portion of the Italian Apennines, stand out from the main chain as an impregnable fortress. On the southernmost side of this massive ridge, facing the crowned peak of Mount Sibyl, raises the titanic shape of Mount Vettore, with its huge, imposing mass, an arched behemoth that overwhelms the whole mountainous region with its elevated top and vertiginous, sinister cliffs (Fig. 1).

Deeply enclosed within the precipitous arms of this giant of stone, two small mirrors of pure, clear water lie in silence and stillness. They are the Lakes of Pilate, waiting in their solitary nest, surrounded by loooming, overhanging versants of vertical rock (Fig. 2).

The Lakes of Pilate: two icy, crystal-like surfaces, set at the bottom of Mount Vettore's glacial cirque, high up amid sheer walls of rock, quietly reflecting the sky above (Fig. 3).

Whoever had the chance to climb the gigantic mountain and visit the place hidden between the cliffs of rock knows well the feeling of indistinct, dumbfounded awe that seizes a human soul when left alone before this overpowering might, echoing any step that may be taken, any sound and any word that might be uttered, with hesitant whispers, by the unwary visitor.

This is a truly blood-curdling place. A sort of theatrical scenery, ready for some kind of eerie performance. It is a setting where an inexplicable, dreadful event seems to be about to happen (Fig. 4).

The above description has much of the poetical and the literary. However, it is the very nature of the site that conveys the listed feelings, bringing to the mind a weird impression of apprehension and expectation.

Mount Vettore is the result of the titanic strain produced by the clash of two tectonic plates, confronting each other over the full length of the Apennines and colliding with giant might in the area of today's Sibillini Mountain Range. Ten million years ago the mountainous landform began to raise its peaks and crests from the bottom of a vanished sea. The process lasted many million years and the geological outcome was the massive ridges we see today (Fig. 5).

It was at the end of the Pleistocene, during the Würm glaciation, a period extending from 100,000 to 10,000 years ago, that the Ice Age produced the most impressive feature which marks Mount Vettore as we know it today: the glacial cirque, a colossal hemicycle carved in the very matrix of the landform, which gives the mount its fantastic, astounding U-shaped structure, a sort of immense horseshoe. A glacier made all this, eroding and grinding the mount's rock by its ceaseless motion under the pull of gravity, for hundreds and hundreds of centuries.

Today, the ancient glacier has vanished, but the savage effects of its incessant action are fully visible. Mount Vettore is hollowed out from the inside: a large valley is carved in its bowels, going from the elevated cliffs above, the razor-sharp rim of a rocky semicircular wall (Fig. 6), straight down to the lower lands below, surrounded by further peaks, including Mount Sibyl.

Up there, at the very centre of a vertiginous hemisphere of stone, whose walls are more than 1,500 feet high, the Lakes of Pilate stand, feeding on rainfall and molten snow, away from human life, totally enshrouded in silence.

They are not entirely alone, because their waters are inhabited by a small living being: a tiny shrimp, around 0.4 inches long, featuring an elegant coral-red colouring, a delicate animal which swims and drifts within the boundaries of the two icy lakes. The 'Chirocephalus Marchesonii' can only be found there, fully adapted to the harsh environmental conditions, with its minute determination to survive (Fig. 7).

Such are the Lakes of Pilate, set in the middle of the Sibillini Mountain Range. And if you look down, along the valley which follows the antique glacier's displacement route, you will enjoy a gorgeous vista. A vista which is dominated by the crowned peak of Mount Sibyl. Five miles away, and in full view.

The Lakes of Pilate: this is a place where an obscure, sinister legend might certainly resolve to settle down.

As it actually did. And all this occurred under the name of Pontius Pilate, the prefect of Judaea.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /2. Il maestoso, formidabile abbraccio del Monte Vettore
Al centro dell'Italia, i bastioni del massiccio dei Monti Sibillini, una porzione del sistema montuoso degli Appennini, si innalzano dalla catena principale come un'imprendibile fortezza. Nella parte più meridionale di queste imponenti elevazioni, proprio di fronte alla cima coronata del Monte Sibilla, si erge la forma titanica del Monte Vettore, con la sua enorme, incombente massa, un gigante arcuato che sovrasta e domina l'intera regione con la sua altissima vetta e i suoi ripidissimi, spaventosi precipizi (Fig. 1).

Profondamente incassati tra le braccia precipiti di questo gigante di pietra, due piccoli specchi d'acque pure e chiarissime giacciono nel silenzio assoluto di questi luoghi. Sono i Laghi di Pilato, che attendono nel loro solitario riparo, circondati dalle pareti, minacciose e colossali, di roccia verticale (Fig. 2.

I Laghi di Pilato: due superfici di gelida acqua cristallina, posti nel fondo del circo glaciale del Monte Vettore, in alta quota, tra mura di roccia torreggianti, placidamente riflettenti il cielo lontano, nelle altitudini infinite (Fig. 3).

Chiunque abbia mai avuto la possibilità di ascendere questa gigantesca montagna e visitare quel luogo, occultato tra le altissime scogliere di pietra, conosce bene quella sensazione di indistinto, attonito timore che coglie lo spirito dell'uomo quando si rimane soli dinanzi a questa terrificante potenza, che echeggia del rumore di ogni passo, che riverbera il suono di ogni parola che possa essere pronunciata, con riluttante sussurro, dall'incauto visitatore.

Un luogo pauroso, agghiacciante. Una sorta di scenario teatrale, pronto per una magica, inquietante rappresentazione. Un sito nel quale sembra stia per verificarsi, da un momento all'altro, un evento terribile e inspiegabile (Fig. 4).

La descrizione da noi proposta sembrerebbe avere molto del poetico e del letterario. Eppure, è la natura stessa di questi luoghi a suscitare i sentimenti illustrati, evocando nell'animo suggestive impressioni di apprensione e aspettativa.

Il Monte Vettore è il risultato delle titaniche tensioni generatesi nello scontro di due placche tettoniche, che si fronteggiano lungo tutta la lunghezza degli Appennini, collidendo con spinte colossali nell'area dei Monti Sibillini. Dieci milioni di anni fa il massiccio montuoso cominciò a innalzare le proprie creste e i propri picchi dal fondo di un mare oggi svanito. Il processo si è protratto per molti milioni di anni, e l'effetto geologico di esso è proprio quell'insieme di elevati rilievi che oggi vediamo (Fig. 5).

Fu al termine del Pleistocene, durante la glaciazione di Würm, un periodo terminato 10.000 anni fa e cominciato circa 100.000 anni prima, che l'Era Glaciale ha prodotto l'impressionante struttura che caratterizza il Monte Vettore così come oggi lo conosciamo: il circo glaciale, un colossale emiciclo scavato nella nuda matrice del monte, il quale conferisce alla montagna la sua fantastica, stupefacente forma a 'U', una sorta di immenso ferro di cavallo. Fu un ghiacciaio a compiere tutto questo, erodendo e frantumando la roccia della montagna con la sua incessante traslazione, sotto la spinta della gravità, per centinaia e centinaia di secoli.

Oggi, l'antico ghiacciaio non esiste più, ma i dirompenti effetti della sua ininterrotta azione sono ancora pienamente visibili. Il Monte Vettore appare infatti scavato dall'interno: un'enorme vallata è intagliata nelle sue viscere, una cavità che procede dalle cime più elevate in altitudine, marcate dai bordi sottili e quasi taglienti di una muraglia di roccia semicircolare (Fig. 6), giù fino alle terre poste a quote meno elevate, circondate da ulteriori vette, tra le quali il Monte Sibilla.

Lassù, nel centro esatto di quel vertiginoso emisfero di pietra, le cui pareti si innalzano per più di cinquecento metri, si trovano i Laghi di Pilato, alimentati dalle piogge e dallo scioglimento delle nevi, lontano dalla vita degli uomini, completamente avvolti nel silenzio.

Quei laghi, in realtà, non sono completamente desolati, perché le loro acque sono abitate da un minuscolo essere vivente: un piccolo crostaceo, lungo circa un centimetro, rivestito di un'elegante livrea rosso corallo, un animale delicato che nuota e veleggia all'interno dei ristretti confini dei due gelidi laghi. Il 'Chirocephalus Marchesonii' è rinvenibile solo qui, in perfetto adattamento rispetto alle difficilissime condizioni ambientali nelle quali si trova a dimorare, con la sua minuta determinazione a sopravvivere (Fig. 7).

Questi, dunque, sono i Laghi di Pilato, posti all'interno del massiccio dei Monti Sibillini. E a chi volgesse il proprio sguardo verso il basso, lungo la vallata che segue il percorso compiuto dall'antico ghiacciaio, si presenterebbe alla vista uno spettacolo grandioso. Uno scenario che è dominato dal picco coronato del Monte Sibilla. A otto chilometri di distanza, e in piena linea di vista.

I Laghi di Pilato: un luogo presso il quale un'oscura, tenebrosa leggenda potrebbe ben decidere di prendere dimora.

Come, in effetti, è accaduto. E ciò si è verificato nel nome di Ponzio Pilato, prefetto della Giudea.

















































































































19 Apr 2019
A legend for a Roman prefect: the Lakes of Pontius Pilate /1. The Sibyl is not alone
The Sibillini Mountain Range: a majestic, imposing natural feature raising in the Apennines, at the very center of Italy, between the provinces of Umbria and Marche (Fig. 1). A secluded region including a number of elevated peaks. A land of deep valleys, steep mountain-sides and small villages which have never been part of the main historical routes treaded through Italy by pilgrims, soldiers and wayfarers, the ancient roads that led to Rome and the harbours and towns of southern Italy. A place where the power of myth is still strong, and legendary tales have thrived for centuries, their sinister fame having spread throughout Europe for hundreds of years among travellers, men of letters and necromancers of all countries.

In a previous series of articles (“Birth of a Sibyl: The Medieval Connection”) we have journeyed into the legend of the Apennine Sibyl, the mythical tale which, from the fifteenth century onwards, narrated of an enchanted realm concealed beneath the crowned peak of Mount Sibyl (Fig. 2). On the mountain-top, a gloomy cavern provided an access to a subterranean land full of lavish palaces, precious treasures and sensual damsels, a hidden region ruled by a Queen Sibyl, an oracle and a prophetess, and an evil being looking for knights and their souls, to be held captive in an endless, unholy bliss until the end of the world.

In those articles, we carried out a hunt for the medieval roots of the Sibyl's fifteenth-century tales. We removed a collection of literary additions conferred to the legendary tale of the Apennine Sibyl, by taking off the concentric layers that encircled and suffocated the true mythical nucleus. We found out that an illustrious lineage for that Sibyl can be traced up to a medieval 'Sebile', a fay who is staged in many earlier chivalric poems and romances together with her more famed companion and alter ego: Morgan the Fay, a prominent character beloging to the Matter of Britain and the Arthurian cycle.

And we also found additional traces of something that goes even deeper: a few selected elements, a magical bridge, an ever-slamming metal gate, which are drawn from a much more antique tradition, pertaining to ancient narratives of travels into the Netherworld and the testing of the souls of mortal beings.

From this very point, from the paper “Birth of a Sibyl - The medieval connection”, we are now ready to start a new exciting travel and a veritable plunge deep into the very core and meaning of the legend of the Apennine Sibyl.

However, before we tread this thrilling, wholly unknown road, we need to confront with another momentous task.

Because the legend of an Apennine Sibyl is not the one and only legend that lives within the same Sibillini Mountain Range, in Italy.

Another legend lives there. A different myth. A tale that is only 5.2 miles apart: the exact distance which lies between the cliff of Mount Sibyl and the spot where this further legend lies.

This is the legend of the Lakes of Pilate.

A legend that is set in the most secluded core of the Sibillini Mountain Range, as it is nested right within the rocky, titanic arms of Mount Vettore, the Range's most elevated peak (Fig. 3).

And this further legendary site looks straight into Mount Sibyl. Because the two sites, the Sibyl's cliff and the Lakes, are in full line of sight one another (Fig. 4).

Let's start this new travel, too. And let's find out whether we can clean this second myth, too, of any narrative elements that have been added with time to its story, possibly borrowed from other different mythical tales. Just as we did for the legend of the Apennine Sibyl. In search for an ultimate truth.

In our quest, we will take advantage of information provided in previous articles (“The Lake of Pilatus in an antique manuscript: Pierre Bersuire and the fourteenth-century dark renown of Norcia's lake”, and others). We will also draw on a remarkable paper published in 1893 by a great Italian scholar, Arturo Graf, providing a comprehensive summary on the ancient legends concerning Pontius Pilate and his resting place. And we will benefit from a number of scientific papers written on the same subject by illustrious specialists, including the recent works published by renowned researchers such as Anne-Catherine Baudoin and Jacques Berlioz.

Let's begin right now. And let's begin from the very place and setting in which the legend is harboured.

Let's begin from the lakes: the mysterious waters set in the deepest heart of the Sibillini Mountain Range, whose name is, even today, the Lakes of Pilate.
Una leggenda per un prefetto romano: i Laghi di Ponzio Pilato /1. La Sibilla non è sola
Il massiccio dei Monti Sibillini: un grandioso spettacolo della Natura che si innalza maestosamente tra gli Appennini, al centro della penisola italiana, tra le regioni dell'Umbria e delle Marche (Fig. 1). Un territorio appartato, che comprende varie cime elevate. Una terra di profonde vallate, versanti scoscesi e piccoli villaggi che non hanno mai fatto parte dei principali itinerari storicamente percorsi, attraverso l'Italia, da pellegrini, soldati e viandanti, lungo le antiche vie che conducevano a Roma e alle città portuali del meridione italiano. Un luogo nel quale il potere del mito è ancora forte, e racconti leggendari hanno vibrato per secoli, segnati da una fama sinistra che si è diffusa per centinaia e centinaia d'anni in tutta Europa, tra viaggiatori, letterati e incantatori di ogni nazione.

In una precedente serie di articoli ("Nascita di una Sibilla: la traccia medievale"), abbiamo viaggiato attraverso la leggenda della Sibilla Appenninica, il racconto leggendario che, a partire dal quindicesimo secolo, ha narrato di un regno incantato nascosto al di sotto del picco coronato del Monte Sibilla (Fig. 2). Sulla cima di quella montagna, un'oscura caverna rendeva possibile accedere a un luogo sotterraneo ricolmo di ricchi palazzi, preziosi tesori e sensuali damigelle: una regione nascosta governata da una Regina Sibilla, oracolo e profetessa, entità demoniaca in cerca di cavalieri, e delle loro anime, da trattenere in prigionia tra delizie impure e senza fine, sino al termine del mondo.

In quegli articoli, abbiamo condotto un'investigazione alla ricerca delle radici medievali del mito quattrocentesco della Sibilla. Abbiamo rimosso una serie di sovrastrutture letterarie che sono andate sovrapponendosi al racconto sibillino, eliminando tutti quegli strati concentrici che ne avviluppavano e ne soffocavano il fondo mitico più vero. Abbiamo potuto rilevare come sia rintracciabile nel tempo, per questa Sibilla, un'illustre ascendenza, fino a una medievale 'Sebile', una fata che compare in vari poemi e romanzi cavallereschi di epoca precedente, assieme con la sua più famosa compagna e 'alter ego': Morgana la Fata, uno dei principali personaggi che appartenengono alla Materia di Bretagna e al ciclo arturiano.

E, inoltre, siamo stati in grado di individuare ulteriori tracce di qualcosa che parrebbe spingersi ancora più oltre: alcuni elementi specifici, un ponte magico, delle porte di metallo eternamente battenti, tratti da tradizioni ancora più antiche, che si riferiscono a narrazioni di viaggi oltremondani e al giudizio sulle anime dei mortali.

Proprio da questo punto, a partire dal lavoro di ricerca compiuto in "Nascita di una Sibilla: la traccia medievale", siamo ora pronti a dare inizio a un nuovo emozionante viaggio, un vero e proprio tuffo in profondità nel cuore e nel significato più vero della leggenda della Sibilla Appenninica.

Nondimeno, prima di intraprendere questo nuovo, appassionante percorso nell'ignoto, dobbiamo necessariamente confrontarci con un'altra questione di fondamentale rilevanza.

Perché la leggenda concernente una Sibilla degli Appennini non è l'unico racconto mitico vivente tra le vette del massiccio dei Monti Sibillini.

Un'altra leggenda vive tra quelle cime. Un mito differente. Un racconto che una distanza di soli 8,3 chilometri separa dal primo: la distanza esatta che intercorre tra la vetta del Monte Sibilla e il luogo in cui abita questa ulteriore leggenda.

È la leggenda dei Laghi di Pilato.

Una leggenda che è posta nel cuore più nascosto del massiccio dei Monti Sibillini, dimorando essa all'interno delle titaniche braccia rocciose del Monte Vettore, la cima più elevata di tutta la catena (Fig. 3).

E questo ulteriore sito leggendario guarda direttamente verso il Monte Sibilla. Perché i due luoghi, il picco della Sibilla e i Laghi, si trovano in piena linea di vista l'uno con l'altro (Fig. 4).

Cominciamo dunque questo nuovo viaggio. E andiamo a investigare se sia possibile liberare anche questo secondo mito da tutti quegli elementi narrativi che sono stati aggiunti nei secoli al suo racconto, elementi tratti da altre e differenti narrazioni leggendarie. Esattamente ciò che abbiamo già effettuato in relazione alla leggenda della Sibilla Appenninica. In cerca della verità più profonda e nascosta.

Nel corso di questa ricerca, perseguiremo questi obiettivi utilizzando gli articoli già da noi pubblicati ("Il Lago di Pilato in un antico manoscritto: Pierre Bersuire e la tenebrosa fama del lago di Norcia nel quattordicesimo secolo", e altri). Ci avvarremo, inoltre, di un fondamentale articolo pubblicato nel 1893 da un grande studioso, Arturo Graf, che rende disponibile una esaustiva ricapitolazione delle leggende che riguardano Ponzio Pilato e il luogo della sua sepoltura. E ci rivolgeremo, infine, a una serie di articoli scientifici redatti, su questo stesso tema, da illustri specialisti, tra i quali le opere recentemente pubblicate da ricercatori quali Anne-Catherine Baudoin e Jacques Berlioz.

Cominciamo immediatamente. E cominciamo proprio da quel luogo, dallo specifico scenario nel quale la leggenda si trova ad essere immersa.

Cominciamo dai laghi: le misteriose acque che giacciono nel cuore più profondo dei Monti Sibillini, e il cui nome è, ancora oggi, 'Laghi di Pilato'.














































































29 Jun 2017
The mysterious call of the Lakes of Pilatus
Another gorgeous footage shot by a drone hovering over the crystal-clear waters of the Lakes of Pilatus, sitting in their cradle amid the appalling ravines of Mount Vettore, in central Italy.

[Drone footage by Roberto Giancaterina]
Il misterioso richiamo dei Laghi di Pilato
Una nuova stupefacente sequenza aerea filmata da un drone in volo sulle acque cristalline dei Laghi di Pilato, incastonati tra i baratri spaventosi del Monte Vettore.

[Immagini da drone realizzate da Roberto Giancaterina]





















21 Apr 2017
Italy, the magical spell of the Lakes of Pilatus
There is a place in Italy which is full of memories of wizards and spellbooks: the Lakes of Pilatus, sitting in a titanic cradle of rock at the very core of Mount Vettore, in central Italy. A unique, sinister sight which used to be the destination of choice for sorcerers and magicians coming from all over Europe, just a few miles away from the gloomy legend of Mount Sibyl. This astounding aerial sequence shows all the incredible fascination of the lakes and encircling ravines.

[Drone footage by AP Drones - Maltignano]
Italia, l'incanto magico dei Laghi di Pilato
Esiste un luogo in Italia dove indugiano antiche memorie di stregoni e libri magici: i Laghi di Pilato, adagiati all'interno di un titanico cerchio di roccia nel cuore del Monte Vettore, nei Monti Sibillini. Una visione unica e sinistra, destinazione nei secoli di incantatori e negromanti provenienti da ogni nazione d'Europa, a poche miglia dal tenebroso e leggendario Monte Sibilla. Questa straordinaria sequenza aerea mostra tutto l'incredibile fascino dei laghi e dei baratri che li circondano.

[Immagini da drone a cura di AP Drones - Maltignano]

















2 Mar 2017
Italy or Switzerland: which one is the true Lake of Pilatus?
Did you know that the Italian Lake of Pilatus is not the one and only?

There is actually another "Lake of Pilatus": a Swiss one, on the Tomlishorn (Mount Pilatus – in the picture), a cliff which stands a few miles from the town of Luzern. And it has its own legend, too: a legend that is almost identical to the Italian one...

According to the legendary tale of the Lake of Pilatus (the Swiss one), the body of Pontius Pilatus, the Roman prefect of Judaea who put Jesus Christ to death, was repelled by the roaring waters of both the Tiber and the Rhone. So it was decided to discard the unwanted corpse in a remote lake of Switzerland, on an isolated mountain-top.

Thus far, the tale is very similar to the legend associated with Italy's Lake of Pilatus sitting in the glacial valley of Mount Vettore. And coincidences are not over. Just like the Italian lake, its Switzerland counterpart was subject to fierce turmoils of its waters, arising from the wicked soul buried beneath the icy surface, and accompanied by savage storms which raged the Luzern region and its inhabitants.

How can it be that a same legend – with a mountain, a lake, the body of Pilatus and the storms - is present in Italy and Switzerland at the same time? (by the way: today no lake is to be found anymore on the Tomlishorn's cliff). Why is this odd occurrence so similar to the one relating to Tannhäuser's Venusberg (whose legend is thoroughly identical to that of Mount Sibyl – a few miles across from the Italian Lake of Pilatus)?

Dates can be of sure guidance to us: the Pilatus legend at the Tomlishorn in Switzerland cannot be traced before the fifteenth century, while the Italian legend on Pilatus and his lake can be dated, in Italy, as far back as the fourteenth century.

So, can we suppose that someone brought the legend from Italy to Switzerland?

The answer is yes, and the persons to be possibly charged for that is a character who played a primary role in the Italian Mount Sibyl's legend. His name is Felix Hemmerlin, a Swiss cleric who was born in 1388. He came to know deeply the legend of Mount Sibyl, since 1420 as he reports in his work “De Nobilitate et Rusticitate Dialogus”: in it, he first established a direct, unmistakable link between Mount Sibyl and Tannhäuser's Venusberg.

Therefore, he knew everything about Mount Vettore and its Lake of Pilatus. And he was born in Zurich, a few dozens of miles from Luzern, where he died in 1460.

The Pilatus legend in Switzerland dates back to the fifteenth century: that's exactly Hemmerlin's time. He possibly “pasted and copied” from Italy to Switzerland the Italian legend on Pilatus and his lake. A legend he knew well and strongly impressed his soul.

That's why the Italian Lake of Pilatus is the one and only. It is the true and original one. Don't mind about Swiss lakes: they are just fake copies belonging to a later age. The real legend is in Italy.
Italia o Svizzera: quale dei due è il vero Lago di Pilato?
Sapevate che il Lago di Pilato in Italia non è il solo ed unico Lago di Pilato?

In effetti, esiste anche un altro "Lago di Pilato": un lago svizzero, posto sul Tomlishorn (Monte Pilato - in figura), una cima che sorge a pochi chilometri dalla città di Lucerna. E anch'esso dispone della propria leggenda: una leggenda del tutto simile a quella del lago italiano...

Secondo il leggendario racconto che circonda il Lago di Pilato (quello svizzero), il corpo di Ponzio Pilato, il prefetto romano della Giudea, colui che condannò Gesù alla morte per crocifissione, fu rifiutato dalla acque mugghianti del Tevere, e poi da quelle del Rodano. Così fu deciso di gettare l'indesiderato cadavere in un remoto lago della Svizzera, posto sull'isolata cima di una montagna.

Fin qui, il racconto appare veramente simile alla leggenda che riguarda il Lago di Pilato in Italia, situato all'interno del circo glaciale del Monte Vettore. Ma le coincidenze non sono ancora finite. Proprio come nel lago italiano, la lacustre controparte svizzera era parimenti soggetta a violente turbolenze delle acque, causate dall'anima dannata sepolta al di sotto della fredda superficie liquida, e accompagnate inoltre da terribili uragani che erano soliti devastare la regione di Lucerna e affliggere i suoi abitanti.

Come può accadere che una stessa leggenda - con la montagna, il lago, il corpo di Ponzio Pilato e le tempeste - risulti essere presente sia in Italia che in Svizzera? (a proposito: oggi non è più dato reperire alcun lago sulla cima del Tomlishorn). Perché questa strana occorrenza sembra essere così simile a quella relativa al Venusberg del Cavaliere Tannhäuser (la cui leggenda è del tutto identica a quella del Monte Sibilla - a poche miglia dal Lago di Pilato italiano)?

Le date possono esserci di grande aiuto: la leggenda di Pilato sul monte Tomlishorn in Svizzera non è rintracciabile prima del quindicesimo secolo, mentre la leggenda italiana su Pilato ed il suo lago risale almeno al quattordicesimo secolo.

Dunque, si può forse supporre che qualcuno abbia trasportato la leggenda dall'Italia alla Svizzera?

La risposta è positiva, e la persona forse responsabile di ciò è un personaggio che ha giocato un ruolo fondamentale nella leggenda italiana del Monte Sibilla. Il suo nome è Felix Hemmerlin, un canonico svizzero nato nel 1388. Egli si imbatté nella leggenda del Monte Sibilla nel 1420, come egli stesso riporta esplicitamente nella sua opera "De Nobilitate et Rusticitate Dialogus": in essa, Hemmerlin stabilisce una connessione diretta e inequivocabile tra il Monte Sibilla e il Venusberg di Tannhäuser.

Quindi, Hemmerlin era perfettamente a conoscenza delle leggende che circolavano attorno al Monte Vettore e al suo Lago di Pilato. Ed egli era nato a Zurigo, a poche decine di chilometri da Lucerna, dove morì nel 1460.

La leggenda svizzera di Pilato risale al quindicesimo secolo: esattamente l'epoca di Hemmerlin. Egli, forse, ha "copiato ed incollato" dall'Italia alla Svizzera la leggenda italiana di Pilato e del lago. Una leggenda che egli conosceva bene e che lo aveva fortemente impressionato.

Ecco perché il Lago di Pilato sul Monte Vettore è l'unico ed il solo. E' quello vero, quello originale. Non vi curate dei laghi svizzeri: essi sono solo copie di seconda mano appartenenti ad un'epoca successiva. La vera leggenda è in Italia.



















8 Dic 2016
The sinister renown of the Lakes of Pilatus
Norcia and the earthquakes: an eerie, centuries-old connection which is attested by the legends about the consecrations of spellbooks at the Lake of Pilatus, as reported, among others, by French author Antoine De La Sale in his fifteenth-century account “The Paradise of Queen Sibyl”:

«First, I will tell you of the mount and lake of Queen Sibyl, which is called by some the mount of the lake of Pilatus, a part of the Duchy of Spoletium and in the territory of the town of Norcia.

This mountain of the lake is ten thousand feet high, as the locals say. Snow is to be found there throughout the year. To my estimate, the lake is the size of the Castle of Angiers; a small islet is at the lake's center, made of a boulder which long ago was encircled by a wall; foundations of walls can still be seen in many spots. A narrow passageway goes from the shore to the small island, being some five feet under the water; I was told that by Pope's orders it had been ruined by the locals so as to prevent those who intended to reach the island to consecrate their books and summon the demons to find a way through.

The islet is now much guarded and watched over by the locals, because when anybody comes in secrecy to perform the black magic of the Fiend, A STORM IMMEDIATELY SCOURGES THE COUNTRY, SO FIERCE THAT IT UTTERLY RAVAGES THE CROPS AND POSSESSIONS THROUGHOUT THE REGION.

No much time has passed since two men were seized, one of them being a priest; this priest was brought to the said town of Norcia: there he was put to death and burnt at the stake, and the other man was slaughtered to pieces and then thrown into the lake by those who had seized him».

This is a region where men's legends and the subterranean powers of nature melt together, in a unique mix of landscape beauty and traditional tales.
La fama sinistra dei Laghi di Pilato
Norcia e i terremoti: un secolare, inquietante legame che è attestato dalle leggende che narrano della consacrazione di libri di magia presso i Laghi di Pilato, come testimoniato, tra gli altri, dallo scrittore francese Antoine de La Sale nel suo resoconto “Il Paradiso della Regina Sibilla”, risalente al quindicesimo secolo:

«Per prima cosa vi narrerò del monte e del lago della Regina Sibilla, che è chiamato da alcuni il monte del lago di Pilato, parte del Ducato di Spoleto nel territorio della città di Norcia.

Questa montagna del lago è alta tremila metri, come dicono i locali. La neve è presente tutto l'anno. Secondo la mia stima, il lago ha le dimensioni del Castello di Angiers; un piccolo isolotto si trova nel centro del lago, fatto di una roccia che un tempo era circondata da un muro; la base del muro è ancora visibile in molti punti. Uno stretto passaggio, sommerso dall'acqua per circa un metro e mezzo, conduce dalla riva alla piccola isola; mi è stato detto che per ordine del Papa è stato distrutto dalla gente del luogo per impedire il passaggio a coloro che intendevano raggiungere l'isola di consacrare i loro libri ed evocare i dèmoni.

L'isolotto è ora molto sorvegliato e controllato dalla gente del luogo, perché quando qualcuno vi si reca in segreto per praticare la magia nera del Nemico, UNA TEMPESTA DEVASTA IMMEDIATAMENTE IL PAESE, COSI' INTENSA DA DISTRUGGERE COMPLETAMENTE I RACCOLTI E I BENI IN TUTTA LA REGIONE.

Non è passato molto tempo da quando due uomini furono catturati, uno di essi un prete; questo prete fu tratto alla detta città di Norcia; lì fu posto a morte e bruciato sul rogo, e l'altro fu smembrato e poi gettato nel lago da coloro che lo avevano catturato».

Questo è un territorio dove le leggende degli uomini e le forze sotterranee della natura si incontrano, in una fusione unica tra meraviglie del paesaggio e racconti tradizionali.

















4 Sep 2016
A journey of Arnolf of Harff to the Lakes of Pilatus
Page from "The pilgrimage of Knight Arnolf of Harff from Colonia to Italy and other countries", written in 1497, with the quote about the lake in the region of Norcia.
Arnolf of Harff wrote in his report that each time necromancers ventured themselves up to the lake «and summoning was effected, the waters in the lake rose frenzily in a cloud and then came down again with an uproar as loud as thunder».
Il viaggio di Arnold of Harff ai Laghi di Pilato
Pagine dal “Pellegrinaggio del Cavaliere Arnolfo di Harff da Colonia all'Italia e altri Paesi”, scritto nel 1497, contenenti la citazione a proposito del lago situato nella regione di Norcia.
Nella sua cronaca, Arnolfo di Harff scrisse che ogni volta che i negromanti si spingevano su fino al lago, «e le evocazioni venivano effettuate, le acque del lago si innalzavano in furiosi vapori, per poi ricadere nuovamente con un rombo come di tuono».





















7 Aug 2016
Visions from the Sibillini Range
Visions from the Sibillini Mountain Range in Italy: the lakes of Pilatus nested in the glacial amphitheater of Mount Vettore, as seen from its dizzying crestline.
Visioni dai Monti Sibillini
Visioni dal massiccio dei Monti Sibillini: i Laghi di Pilato, adagiati all'interno dell'anfiteatro glaciale del Monte Vettore. Un panorama osservabile dalla cima delle creste vertiginose che si affacciano su strapiombi verticali.











4 Lug 2016
Lakes of legends
The rising sun casts its beams over the enigmatic waters of the Lakes of Pilatus, nested in the secluded glacial valley which is surrounded by Mount Vettore's high crests, in the Sibillini Range in central Italy. This is a place of special attraction, crowded of legendary lore as it is and for centuries a destination for wizards and necromancers.
Laghi di leggenda
Il sole nascente distende i suoi raggi sulle acque enigmatiche dei Laghi di Pilato, incassato nella solitaria valle glaciale che è circondata dagli elevati picchi del Monte Vettore, nel massiccio dei Monti Sibillini. È un posto dal fascino peculiare, caratterizzato da antiche leggende e luogo d'elezione attraverso secoli per maghi e negromanti.





















3 Oct 2015
Waters of darkness
Another amazing view of the Lakes of Pilatus, sitting in their devil's nest inside Mount Vettore. In the far horizon the crests of the Sibillini range leading to Mount Sibyl and the Sibyl's cave.
Acque di tenebra
Un'altra eccezionale immagine dei Laghi di Pilato, adagiati nel loro sinistro seggio all'interno del circo glaciale del Monte Vettore. All'orizzonte sono visibili le creste dei Sibillini che conducono al Monte Sibilla e alla favolosa grotta.


















3 Oct 2015
Magical, mysterious lakes
For centuries the magical reputation of the Sibillini Range has been fuelled by the presence on the Sibyl's cave on the cliff of Mount Sibyl. Yet another eerie place is present in this elevated lands and - just like the Sibyl - has drawn magicians and sorcerers to the region for hundred of years: the Lakes of Pilatus.
The Lakes of Pilatus were considered as the best place where to celebrate black magic rituals over necromancers' grimoires, the books containing spells and magical conjuration formulas.
The fascinating power of the place is evident if we consider that the two small lakes are situated at some 6,500 feet, actually inside the Mount Vettore glacial amphitheater: an appalling round-shaped stronghold of sheer rock rising up to the mount's semicircular crests for additional 1,600 feet.
Today an impressive view of the lakes and cliffs can be enjoyed using Google Maps. A camera was placed in the spot between the two lakes, commanding a vista that can be defined as breath-taking with no hyperbole at all.
Laghi di magia e mistero
Per centinaia d'anni la presenza di una grotta sibillina sulla rupe del Monte della Sibilla ha accresciuto la magica reputazione che ancora oggi caratterizza il massiccio dei Monti Sibillini. Eppure, anche un altro luogo dal carattere estremamente sinistro si trova ad essere presente in queste lande desolate e - proprio come la Sibilla - ha attirato per secoli maghi e negromanti verso queste contrade: stiamo parlando dei Laghi di Pilato.
I Laghi di Pilato erano considerati come il luogo migliore dove compiere rituali di magia nera sui libri di incantesimi, contenenti formule d'evocazione e scongiuri.
Il fascino di questa località diviene evidente se consideriamo che i due piccoli laghi sono posti ad una altitudine di poco meno di 2.000 metri, esattamente all'interno dell'anfiteatro glaciale racchiuso dalla titanica struttura rocciosa del Monte Vettore: una paurosa fortezza ricurva, fatta di pareti verticali che si innalzano per altri 600 metri fino alle creste semicircolari del monte. Utilizzando Google Maps, è oggi possibile godere di una vista mozzafiato dei laghi e delle scogliere strapiombanti. Una speciale camera è stata piazzata da Google nello spazio che divide i due laghi, catturando così un panorama che può essere definito - senza alcuna iperbole - assolutamente mozzafiato.

MICHELE SANVICO
ITALIAN WRITER
michele.sanvico@italianwriter.it